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Publication Details

Design and Construction of PCC Pavements, Volume II: Design Features and Practices that Influence Performance of Pavements

General Interest: provides practical guidance to engineers responsible for the day-to-day design, construction, rehabilitation, maintenance, and management of pavements.

Primary Topic: Rigid Pavement

Description: This study was conducted to evaluate and analyze portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements in order to develop recommendations for the design and construction of long-lived concrete pavements. It involved a detailed evaluation and analysis of the PCC pavement data in the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database using a variety of methods to determine the design features and practices that have beneficial effects on long-term performance. Emphasis was placed on identifying those specific design features that can be included during design to improve the performance of PCC pavements under various combinations of environmental and traffic loading conditions, and for different subgrade support conditions. The study focused on the development of practical recommendations that can be implemented by highway agencies to increase pavement life.

This report is the second in a series of three volumes on the study. The other volumes are as follows: FHWA-RD-98-052, Vol I Summary of Design Features and Construction Practices that Influence Performance of Pavements and FHWA-RD-98-113, Vol III Improved PCC Performance Models. A study has been conducted to evaluate and analyze portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements in order to develop recommendations for the design and construction of long-lived concrete pavements. It involved a detailed evaluation and analysis of the PCC pavement data in the Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) database using statistical techniques to determine the design features and construction practices that have a beneficial effect on long-term performance.

The study focused on the development of practical recommendations that can be easily implemented by highway agencies to increase pavement life. This volume describes and provides information on design features and construction practices that improve pavement performance. A key focus was to develop canonical discriminant functions that can be used to discriminate between groups of pavements in the sense of being able to tell them apart. The pavements were grouped according to their performance classification, namely, above expectation, as expected, and below expectation. The canonical functions consist of linear combinations of the variables that describe and quantify the pavement design features, site conditions, and construction practices.

FHWA Publication Number: FHWA-RD-98-127

Publication Year: 1998

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Updated: 07/26/2011
 

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