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Management Systems: Driving Performance A Glance at Data-Driven Decisionmaking Practices

Application of Management Systems for Various Assets

The use of management systems information provides a framework for cost-effective decisionmaking that emphasizes enhanced service at reduced life-cycle costs.

In recent years, the transportation community has shifted its emphasis from building the transportation system to managing and enhancing the performance of our transportation system. As the transportation community moves from a program philosophy of being reactive and utilizing the worst-first approach, to that of developing a more strategic approach to asset management, more State transportation agencies are using many of the TAM principles to preserve the system and maximize its performance. A phrase commonly used is "Keep the good road good." Several States even have legislation that requires the implementation of TAM principles linked with funding to their management programs. Legislation can be helpful in setting a clear statewide vision and preserving revenues for important asset preservation.

Information from management systems for highway pavements, bridges, safety, traffic congestion, public-transportation facilities, and other assets are valuable as transportation agencies are under increasing pressure to balance their budgets and at the same time respond to public demands for quality services. The use of management-systems information provides a framework for cost-effective decisionmaking that emphasizes enhanced service at reduced life-cycle costs. The primary outcome of transportation-management systems is improved system performance and safety. There are many different TAM information-management systems, and although the number and types of these systems do vary from State-to-State, benefits can be reaped from understanding the structure of existing information-management systems in a way that improves data analysis, tradeoff analysis, and decisionmaking.

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Updated: 06/18/2012