Death Valley Scenic Byway

National Scenic BywayCalifornia

All Photos (121)

  • View from Zabriskie Point

    The view from Zabriskie Point is worth stopping for.

  • The Walk up to Zabriskie Point

    Travelers make their way up to Zabriskie Point.

  • Zabriskie Point Lookout

    The interpretive sign describes the history of Zabriskie Point.

  • The Borax Museum

    A look at the entrance to Death Valley's Borax Museum.

  • Inside the Borax Museum

    Exhibits line the walls within the Borax Museum.

  • Inside the Borax Museum

    Exhibits line the walls within the Borax Museum.

  • Death Valley Museum and Visitor Center

    A group stands before the Death Valley Museum and Visitor Center.

  • Death Valley Museum -- 190 Feet Below Sea Level

    This is a shot of the front wall of Death Valley Museum and visitor center.

  • The Gold Arrastra at the Borax Museum

    The Gold Arrastra stands outside the Borax Museum.

  • Rainbow Canyon and the Argus Mountains

    This view shows Rainbow Canyon and the Argus Mountain Range as seen to the west at milepost 45.00.

    Download Original (3608 x 2409 pixels, 9.6 MB)

  • View from Father Crowley Point

    This view shows the Argus Mountain Range and Panamint Valley from Father Crowley Point.

    Download Original (3624 x 2425 pixels, 10 MB)

  • Panamint Valley

    This view looks at the Panamint Valley. It can be seen to the east of milepost 48.6.

    Download Original (3610 x 2431 pixels, 10 MB)

  • View of the Valley

    Colorful and crystal-clear views of the entire valley are captured from Dante's View.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 174.3 KB)

  • Looking Across the Black Mountains

    The curves and hills of the Black Mountains can be captured from a high peak above known as Dante's View.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 941.7 KB)

  • Dante's View Road

    Follow this windy road through the Black Mountains to reach Dante's View.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 156.1 KB)

  • Telescope Peak from Dante's View

    Far across a mineral-strewn valley from Dante's View, one can see Telescope Peak, the highest point in the Panamint Mountains.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 143.2 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    The erratic, wavy patterns of the Furnace Creek Badlands are visable from this point high above.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 150.8 KB)

  • Reflections in Badwater Pool

    Small pools of water are located in Badwater, at an astounding 279 feet below sea level!

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 160.4 KB)

  • Choppy Shores of Badwater Spring

    A small spring in the middle of the salt flats does little to provide relief on a scorching Death Valley day- the water isn't drinkable.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 1.9 MB)

  • The Panamint Mountains

    An astounding view of the Panamint Mountains can be witnessed from Badwater.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 2 MB)

  • The Salt Flats of Death Valley

    One of the most fascinating aspects of Death Valley are the geometric patterns and feeling of desolation you will find on the Salt Flats.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 1.3 MB)

  • The Salt Flats

    Composed of 1,000 foot thick chlorides and sediments, the Salt Flats are eerily desolate.

    Download Original (900 x 1200 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Dante's View

    Dante's View in the Black Mountains is considered the most magnificent view of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 900.5 KB)

  • View of Badwater from Dante's View

    Badwater, 282 feet below sea-level, can be seen in its entirety from Dante's View.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 1 MB)

  • A Borax Prospect at Furnace Creek

    An old Borax prospect from the 1800s is still open today near Furnace Creek.

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 211.5 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Wash

    The parched earth and distant hills of Furnace Creek Wash make up some of the most fascinating landscapes of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 527 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    The Furnace Creek Badlands illustrate the geologic wonders of Death Valley nicely.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 187.6 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    The peaks and points of the Furnace Creek Badlands are captured beautifully from this vantage point.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 428.3 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    Scattered formations and rocks dot the Furnace Creek Badlands.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 175.5 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    Wind-smoothed rocky terrain and bright blue sky create a spectacular backdrop for an unforgettable drive.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 164.8 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Cut

    The Furnace Creek Cut leads the eye into the distant mountains.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 190.3 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Ranch Entrance

    The entrance to the Furnace Creek Ranch invites visitors to the Furnace Creek area.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 178.3 KB)

  • Lower Furnace Creek Wash

    Dark, rough terrain makes up the landscape of Lower Furnace Creek Wash.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 179.4 KB)

  • Furnace Creek Badlands

    An aerial view of the Furnace Creek Badlands captures the shapes and patterns of the valley.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Aguereberry Point

    Fantastic views of Death Valley are seen from this vantage point high above Furnace Creek.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 828.7 KB)

  • Sliding Rocks at Racetrack Playa

    One of the apparent mysteries of Death Valley is that of the sliding rocks on Racetrack Playa. How the rocks slide across the completely level, dry surface is the subject of countless hypotheses.

    Download Original (800 x 591 pixels, 428.4 KB)

  • Artist's Palette

    Chemically altered limestone and hematite provide eerily beautiful landscapes in the Black Mountains.

    Download Original (900 x 675 pixels, 236.7 KB)

  • Artist's Drive in Death Valley

    Artist's Drive is shaded in colors created by lime deposits and chemicals in the soil. Here, greens and blues tint the Black Mountains.

    Download Original (800 x 582 pixels, 569.9 KB)

  • Mosaic Canyon Narrows

    A hiker winds through the canyon narrows.

    Download Original (1200 x 1667 pixels, 1.2 MB)

  • The Death Valley Sand Dunes

    The wind changes the surface of the sand dunes each day.

    Download Original (1280 x 960 pixels, 492.4 KB)

  • Red Cathedral and Surrounding Golden Canyon

    Layers and layers of rock lead to the distant Red Cathedral, shown on the right.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 564.8 KB)

  • Manly Beacon

    Manly Beacon was named after two men named Manly and Rogers who hiked 500 miles to Los Angeles and back to get help for stranded emigrants in Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 431.6 KB)

  • Visitors at Aguereberry Point

    Visitors to Death Valley take in the impressive views from Aguereberry Point.

    Download Original (600 x 400 pixels, 84.6 KB)

  • Badlands and Gower Gulch

    View the rugged geology of Gower Gulch from many vantage points above the Badlands.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 164.6 KB)

  • The Badlands in Death Valley

    Late afternoon creeps over the pastel-colored Badlands of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 127.3 KB)

  • Badlands South of Zabriskie Point

    Colorful rock formations shaped by wind and weather create a subdued landscape in the Badlands in Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 153.9 KB)

  • Badlands Wash

    Badlands Wash is composed of layers and patterns of weather-beaten rock.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 508.5 KB)

  • Gower Gulch

    Late afternoon casts sunrays over the muted yellows and oranges of Gower Gulch.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 120.9 KB)

  • Manly Beacon

    Named after a legendary gold seeker William Manly, who helped his party survive being lost in Death Valley, Manly Beacon is located at Golden Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 535.1 KB)

  • Manly Beacon

    A lovely view of Manly Beacon can be seen from the Badlands.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 166.5 KB)

  • Charcoal Kiln in Snow

    An old charcoal kiln from the silver mining era of Death Valley still stands despite harsh weather and wind.

    Download Original (900 x 1200 pixels, 985.1 KB)

  • Charcoal Kilns in Death Valley

    Snow dusts a line of charcoal kilns in Death Valley. During silver and Borax mining in the 1800s, these kilns were used to turn pinon pine to coal to run the smelters at the Modoc Mine.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Darwin Falls

    Astoundingly lush and green compared to other Death Valley landscapes, the 30 foot Darwin Falls in the Panamint region is one stop travelers must take.

    Download Original (1024 x 1520 pixels, 423.7 KB)

  • Darwin Falls in the Panamint Region

    A mere half-hour hike from the road, Darwin Falls is a surprise to travelers who have seen the rest of the dry Death Valley landscape.

    Download Original (900 x 1200 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Darwin Falls From Above

    Darwin Falls cascades over craggy rocks year-round.

    Download Original (916 x 1200 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Dried Up Lakeshore in Badwater

    An ancient lakeshore is located near Mormon Point in Badwater.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 2 MB)

  • Snowcapped Mountains Reflected in Badwater Pool

    Visitors may be surprised to find water in Death Valley, but don't drink it! The taste lives up to its name in Badwater!

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 209.2 KB)

  • Golden Canyon

    The sun begins to light up Golden Canyon, bringing out the rich tones of the rock.

    Download Original (1200 x 1008 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Golden Canyon in Death Valley

    Best when viewed in the afternoon, Golden Canyon's namesake is realized when its golden hues are brought out by sunshine.

    Download Original (900 x 1200 pixels, 1 MB)

  • Manly Beacon at Golden Canyon

    The gold-hued Manly Beacon contrasts brilliantly with the blue sky at Golden Canyon.

    Download Original (850 x 1200 pixels, 902.4 KB)

  • Red Cathedral in Death Valley

    400-foot high Red Cathedral in Golden Canyon is stained red from iron-oxide and contrasts fantastically with the yellow-hued Golden Canyon below and blue skies above.

    Download Original (1200 x 900 pixels, 1.1 MB)

  • Cottonball Basin

    These vast salt flats, called Cottonball Marsh, make up the view from the Harmony Borax Mines.

    Download Original (980 x 750 pixels, 762.5 KB)

  • Harmony Borax Works

    Once the life blood of the Death Valley region, Borax mining was highly dependent on the Harmony Borax Works, which was made up of several industrial buildings.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 534.6 KB)

  • Harmony Borax Works

    The ruins of Harmony Borax tell the story of the Borax mining industry which makes up so much of the history of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 513.8 KB)

  • The Harmony Borax Works

    Located at the abandoned works is some of the old equipment used to mine Borax. Look for interpretive signs at the site to learn more about the uses for some of the curious equipment.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 571 KB)

  • Twenty-Mule-Team Wagon at Harmony Borax Works

    One of the most important parts of the mining process was hauling Borax to the railhead at Mojave for transport. A team of 20 mules had to pull this enormous wagon to get the product onto the train.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 582.7 KB)

  • Mouth of Mosaic Canyon

    The mouth of Mosaic Canyon entices hikers to visit Tucki Mountain.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 551.7 KB)

  • Flood-Scoured Marble in Mosaic Canyon

    Years of weather have smoothed the layers of sediment rock in Mosaic Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 571.8 KB)

  • The Narrows at Mosaic Canyon

    Layers of rock sediments in various hues make the "walls" of the narrows.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 527.2 KB)

  • Layers of Rock in the Narrows of Mosaic Canyon

    Layers of earth and sediments comprise the stripey walls of Mosaic Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 499.2 KB)

  • Rock Layers of Mosaic Canyon

    Stratum of sediments and minerals make up the fascinating geology of Mosaic Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 685.2 KB)

  • Rock Mosaic at Mosaic Canyon

    Mosaic Canyon gained its name from these fascinating mosaics of rock fragments that cemented themselves to canyon walls during a rainstorm flood.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 646.2 KB)

  • Upper Mosaic Canyon

    Hikers will reach upper Mosaic Canyon by way of trails comprised of smooth marble and breccia walls and formations carved out of layers of sediment and minerals.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 556.9 KB)

  • Natural Bridge in Natural Bridge Canyon

    This natural bridge in Natural Bridge Canyon is only one of many geological wonders in Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 149.8 KB)

  • Visitor to Racetrack Playa

    A visitor wonders at the puzzle of a sliding rock that makes a curved trail on Racetrack Playa.

    Download Original (1024 x 748 pixels, 710.7 KB)

  • Manly Beacon

    Manly Beacon, towering over the Furnace Creek Badlands, served as a natural compass for lost miners.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 501 KB)

  • Red Cathedral

    Composed of cemented gravel and weathered to exist in its current state, Red Cathedral is one of the most fascinating sites in Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 519.2 KB)

  • Red Cathedral From a Distance

    Red Cathedral is caught in afternoon light, bringing out the rich crimsons and coppers of the rock.

    Download Original (759 x 557 pixels, 379.7 KB)

  • The Sand Dunes of Death Valley

    The wind makes striking wave patterns in the golden sand dunes of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1367 x 2028 pixels, 958.5 KB)

  • The Death Valley Sand Dunes

    A visitor walks through the golden sand dunes at Death Valley.

    Download Original (2028 x 1358 pixels, 592.8 KB)

  • Wildlife Tracks in Sand Dunes

    Tracks of insects, lizards and birds are left on the surface of the white sand dunes.

    Download Original (1280 x 960 pixels, 271 KB)

  • Brush in Sand Dunes

    Desert foliage breaks up the vast sand fields of Death Valley.

    Download Original (960 x 1280 pixels, 206 KB)

  • Ripples on the Sand Dune Surface

    The surface of the sand dunes are constantly changing due to wind and weather.

    Download Original (960 x 1280 pixels, 217.4 KB)

  • Crusted Sand Dunes at Death Valley

    When the surface of the dunes get wet, the rapid drying causes the earth to become marked in unusual geometric patterns.

    Download Original (960 x 1280 pixels, 209.9 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle

    The grounds of Scotty's Castle are depicted from a window in the Power House.

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 133 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle

    Built by a flamboyant mine promoter in the early 1900s, Scotty's Castle is open for "living history" tours offered by the Park Service.

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 247.2 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle Gate

    The "J" on the gate stands for Albert Johnson, a wealthy insurance man who funded one of Scotty's goldmines. The "S" stands for Walter Scott, better known as "Death Valley Scotty."

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 227.4 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle Museum

    Visitors wander inside the castle museum and learn about the legend of Scotty's Castle .

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 156.6 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle Museum

    An exhibit at the Scotty's Castle museum showcases the history of the man behind the castle and artifacts from the castle collection.

    Download Original (980 x 750 pixels, 169.8 KB)

  • Scotty's Castle Museum

    Interpretive displays inside the museum discuss the significance of Scotty's Castle to the history of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 166.2 KB)

  • Water on the Salt Flats of Death Valley

    Shallow pools of water exist for only days in Death Valley. Most water evaporates as quickly as it comes.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 249.9 KB)

  • Strange Formations on the Salt Flats of Death Valley

    Carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides compose the surface of the Salt Flats. Strange formations and bumps are sculpted by wind and rain.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 551.5 KB)

  • Interpretive Signs at the Salt Flats in Death Valley

    Learning about the creation of the interesting features of the valley is one of the most exciting parts of the Death Valley experience.

    Download Original (2048 x 1536 pixels, 360.1 KB)

  • Rhyolite's Famous Bottle House

    A trip to Rhyolite's famous bottle house is well-worth the side trip from Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 165.5 KB)

  • A Close-Up of the Bottle House in Rhyolite

    Stucco slabs composed of bottlecaps form the walls of the Bottle House in Rhyolite, NV.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 178.4 KB)

  • Rhyolite Ghost Town

    This turn-of-the-century mining town has been abandoned for years, but still provides an intriguing glimpse into the lives of miners who populated this town.

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 144.4 KB)

  • The Bottle House in Rhyolite

    The quirkiest attraction in Rhyolite, the Bottle House will be sure to catch your attention.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 166.3 KB)

  • An Abandoned Structure in Rhyolite

    Just east of Death Valley is Rhyolite, NV, one of the largest ghost mining towns in the country.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 109.7 KB)

  • Crumbling Buildings in Rhyolite, NV

    Once the center of mining and commerce, Rhyolite now tells the story of the emergence-- and conclusion-- of the mining boom of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 151.9 KB)

  • Ubehebe Crater

    A 500-foot deep hole created by bulging magma underneath the surface of the earth now gives this section of Death Valley an otherwordly appearance.

    Download Original (1024 x 678 pixels, 929.8 KB)

  • The Ubehebe Crator

    An aerial shot of the Ubehebe Crator looks like a view of another planet entirely.

    Download Original (1024 x 693 pixels, 987.9 KB)

  • Leadfield Dugout

    This stone, dirt and wood dugout in Leadfield is evidence of past lead mining in Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 229.8 KB)

  • The Narrows of Titus Canyon

    Fascinating geology lines this trail in Titus Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 236 KB)

  • Petroglyphs at Klare Spring

    Ancient petroglyphs on the walls of Klare Spring in Death Valley's Titus Canyon are still well preserved for visitors to see.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 259.6 KB)

  • Red Pass Switchbacks of Titus Canyon

    A view of Red Canyon switchbacks from Titus Canyon shows off more of the fascinating shape and color of Death Valley's geography.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 228.4 KB)

  • Rogers, Bennet, and Telescope Peaks

    Three of the highest peaks in the Panamint Mountains can be seen from across the valley at Dante's View.

    Download Original (1200 x 832 pixels, 1 MB)

  • Teakettle Junction in Death Valley

    This junction sign was started by one visitor who hung a teakettle and a note to other travelers.

    Download Original (2207 x 1485 pixels, 593.9 KB)

  • Telescope Peak

    Telescope Peak, one of the highest points in the Panamint Range, can be seen from Dante's View.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 181.8 KB)

  • Thimble Peak

    The unusual colors and patterns of Thimble Peak are illustrated in this view from White Pass.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 193.6 KB)

  • Titus Canyon

    The walls of Titus Canyon are composed of layers of condensed sediments.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 218.1 KB)

  • View from Red Pass

    The view from Red Pass shows the layers of mountains, hills, and formations you will see from a day-hike through Titus Canyon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 213.1 KB)

  • Beavertail Cactus

    The shallow roots of the Beavertail Cactus have allowed it to flourish in the dry Death Valley earth.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 241.3 KB)

  • Cholla Cactus

    One of the most common forms of cacti in the Death Valley region is the Cholla Cactus, most notable for its green flowers.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 141.7 KB)

  • Fields of Desert Gold

    Fields of yellow flowers extend to the distant mountains.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 169.5 KB)

  • Mariposa Blossom

    A brilliant orange Mariposa blossom contrasts nicely with its drab surroundings.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 188.5 KB)

  • Mojave Aster

    Purple Mojave Asters are common in even the driest areas of Death Valley.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 86.8 KB)

  • Indian Paintbrush

    The brilliant red of the Indian Paintbrush stands out against the surrounding rock.

    Download Original (768 x 1024 pixels, 202.6 KB)

  • Manly Beacon from Zabriskie Point

    One of the many views you can see from Zabriskie Point is this perspective of Manly Beacon.

    Download Original (1024 x 768 pixels, 191.5 KB)

  • Sunset from Zabriskie Point

    A fantastic desert sunset illuminates the sky above Death Valley.

    Download Original (750 x 490 pixels, 60.2 KB)

  • A lone road passes through Death Valley

    A straight highway in Death Valley seems to stretch forever.

  • Presenting Designation Plaque to Death Valley Scenic Byway

    California's Death Valley Scenic Byway receives their designation plaque at the Designation 2002 event at Union Station in Washington DC.

    Download Original (1536 x 1024 pixels, 454.7 KB)