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5. Case Study 1 Key lessons learned – MTA New York City Transit ATS

 

Objective:

To examine real world project and provide key lessons learn when applying systems engineering process to Transportation and transit projects.

This Chapter examines the following three (3) case studies.

1] New York City Transit

The project provides Automatic Train Supervision (ATS) for the A Division of the New York City subway system

Acknowledgements:

Ms Anne O'Neil MTA's New York City Transit – Chief Commissioning Officer for Systems and Ms Deborah Chin MTA's New York City Transit – Deputy Commissioning Officer for Systems generously contributed this case study for the SE Guidebook.

2] Baltimore ATMS project

The City of Baltimore Integrated Traffic Management System is a major upgrade of the City of Baltimore's street traffic management system.

Acknowledges:

Ziad Sabra, Principal of Sabra, Wang & Associates, generously contributed his time for interviews, and contributed much of the information collected for this case study

3] Maryland Chart projects

CHART (Coordinated Highways Action Response Team) is an incident management system for roadways in Maryland.

Acknowledgement:

Richard Dye, CHART Systems Administrator, generously contributed his time for interviews, and contributed much of the information collected for this case study.

These case studies represent a range of transportation and transit projects that involve the use of the systems engineering process and lessons learned.

The New York Transit project represents the systems engineering process used, lessons learned, and what would be done differently on the next project. The case study also represents a large transit property.

The Baltimore ATMS project represent a typical centralized signal systems project. This represents a vast majority of projects that transportation practitioners would encounter. This project examines the lessons learned in the area of procurement, experience, testing, and implementation.

Finally the Maryland Chart project examines the lessons learned on a major statewide ITS project. This project used a fairly rigorous systems engineering process and a significant amount of documentation produced. There was a short falls in the capabilities needed on this project.

This chapter contains the summary of each case study. Chapter 8.5 contains the complete case study as developed by the sponsor of the project.

 

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