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Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design Guide

Table of Contents

Cover graphic

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Appendix cover graphic

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PDF Version (99 MB)

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Notice

Acknowledgements

Table of Contents

CHAPTER 1: What are Separated Bike Lanes?

CHAPTER 2: Overview of the Guide and Planning Process

CHAPTER 3: Why Choose Separated Bike Lanes?

CHAPTER 4: PLANNING SEPARATED BIKE LANES

Summary of Planning Elements

Choosing Locations

Funding, Maintenance, and Outreach

Project Evaluation

CHAPTER 5: Menu of Design Recommendations

Four Step Design Process

Flexibility in the Planning and Design Process

Directional and Width Characteristics

Forms Of Separation

Midblock Considerations

Intersection Design

Other Design Elements

Decision Making Process Examples

CHAPTER 6: Moving forward


APPENDIX

PDF Version (14 MB)

Appendix A: Literature Review

Appendix B: Lessons Learned Report

Appendix C: Crash Analysis Report

Appendix D: Project Evaluation Checklist

Appendix E: Data Collection Information

Appendix F: Future Research Needs

Figures

Figure 1: Elements of Separated Bike Lane Planning and Design
Figure 2: Spectrum of Bicycle Facility Types
Figure 3: Four Types of Transportation Cyclists in Portland
Figure 4: Planning and Design Process Diagram
Figure 5: Number of Complete Streets Projects Nationwide, 2005-2013
Figure 6: Outreach Process for Separated Bike Lanes
Figure 7: Planning and Design Process Diagram
Figure 8: Directional Characteristics: One-Way Design Option 1
Figure 9: Directional Characteristics: One-Way Design Option 2
Figure 10: Directional Characteristics: One-Way Design Option 3
Figure 11: Directional Characteristics: Two-Way Design Option 1
Figure 12: Directional Characteristics: Two-Way Design Option 2
Figure 13: Directional Characteristics: Two-Way Design Option 3
Figure 14: Midblock Considerations: Driveway Design Option 1
Figure 15: Midblock Considerations: Driveway Design Option 2
Figure 16: Midblock Considerations: Transit Stop Design Option 1
Figure 17: Midblock Considerations: Transit Stop Design Option 2
Figure 18: Midblock Considerations: Transit Stop Design Option 3
Figure 19: Midblock Considerations: Accessible Parking Design Option
Figure 20: Midblock Considerations: Loading Zone Design Option 1
Figure 21: Midblock Considerations: Loading Zone Design Option 2
Figure 22: Intersection Design: Signalization
Figure 23: Intersection Design: Lateral Shift
Figure 24: Intersection Design: Mixing Zone
Figure 25: Intersection Design: Bend-In
Figure 26: Intersection Design: Bend-Out
Figure 27: Lane Markings: White Chevrons and White Lines
Figure 28: Lane Markings: Use of Green Paint
Figure 29: Signal Phasing Examples
Figure 30: Bicycle Turning Movements: Bike Boxes and Early Exit
Figure 31: Bicycle Turning Movements: 2-Stage Turn Queue Boxes
Figure 32: Decision Making Process Example 1
Figure 33: Decision Making Process Example 2
Figure 34: Decision Making Process Example 3

Tables

Table 1: Resources for Bicycle Design Elements
Table 2: Planning Elements for Separated Bike Lanes
Table 3: Intersection Treatment Options
Table 4: Bend-In and Bend-Out Comparison


NOTICE

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. This document was prepared for the Federal Highway Administration (Task Order DTFH61-11-D-00035-T-13001) by the University of North Carolina (UNC) Highway Safety Research Center, Sam Schwartz Engineering, and Kittelson & Associates, Inc. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the use of the information contained in this document.

The U.S. Government does not endorse products or manufacturers. Trademarks or manufacturers' names appear in this report only because they are considered essential to the objective of this document.

The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors, who are responsible for thefacts and accuracy of the data presented herein.

The report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. It does not create orconfer any rights for or on any person or operate to bind the public.

Images in the report are intended to serve as examples of the range of real world existing conditions; they are not limited to best practices or approved designs and in some cases may reflect conditions that are not recommended.

COMPLIANCE WITH THE MUTCD

Any traffic control devices that are used for separated bike lanes must comply with thManual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). The MUTCD is incorporated breference in 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 655, Subpart F, and is approved as the national standard for designing, applying, and planning traffic control devices installed oany street, highway, or bikeway open to public travel. The FHWA issues the MUTCD, which contains all national design, application, and placement standards, guidance, options, and support provisions for traffic control devices used with separated bike lanes. Thjurisdiction implementing the bike lane must ensure that the project complies with the MUTCD. Please note that interim approvals (IAs) have been issued by the FHWA for green colored pavement (IA-14) and bicycle signal faces (IA-17). Agencies who desire to use green colored pavement or bicycle signal faces must request specific approval from the FHWAusing the procedure outlined in Paragraphs 14 through 22 of Section 1A.10 of the MUTCD. Please also note that bike boxes and two-stage turn boxes are still experimental. Agencies who desire to experiment with bike boxes or two-stage turn boxes must request approval from the FHWA using the procedure outlined in Paragraphs 8 through 11 of Section 1A.10 of the MUTCD. The FHWA maintains a web page regarding the MUTCD approval status of various bicycle-related treatments at http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/bicycle_pedestrian/guidance/design_guidance/mutcd.

Publication Number: FHWA-HEP-15-025

Updated: 5/18/2015
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