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Environmental Justice Training Summary

July 17, 2012, Washington D.C

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Introduction and Background

This report summarizes the Environmental Justice (EJ) Training event sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) on July 17, 2012, in Washington D.C. The purpose of the training was to help transportation practitioners at state and local levels better understand and more effectively approach environmental justice. The training is part of the Department's recommitment to EJ in response to the "Memorandum of Understanding on Environmental Justice and Executive Order 12898" that was signed by 17 Federal agencies in August of 2011. The training also featured discussion of the 2012 USDOT EJ Order, the 2012 Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) EJ Order, and the 2012 Federal Transit Administration (FTA) EJ Circular.

The objectives of the training were to:

Attendees heard from senior leadership at the USDOT, shared their knowledge in discussion sessions, and asked questions of presenters in panel discussions. Over lunch, attendees participated in small group discussions on public involvement techniques. (See Appendix A for the agenda.) Many key themes emerged throughout the course of the training, and participants identified a need for the following:

Key Themes and Findings

There remains confusion over the distinction between EJ and Title VI. There is still some lingering confusion among transportation practitioners regarding the distinction between EJ and Title VI. The new documents released by USDOT and the operating administrations have helped to clarify the differences, but continuing education is necessary.

The USDOT operating administrations each have unique guidance and requirements for environmental justice.

Image of a man carrying a young boy on his shoulders

Practitioners greatly benefit from peer exchange of successes and challenges in public engagement. Participants shared a wealth of knowledge with one another on strategies for public engagement, and discussed tactics such as partnering with community groups. Many organizations still face significant challenges in conducting public outreach and in effectively tracking public involvement.

Participants indicated that there is a need to continue these types of in-depth discussions among practitioners in order to share best practices and lessons learned and advance the state of the practice for EJ implementation. Organizations have much to learn from one another, and participants at the forum indicated that the USDOT and other agencies should consider methods to effectively promote interagency collaboration and information exchange on Federal, state, and local levels.

Practitioners are seeking additional guidance and case studies. Practitioners desire additional guidance on determining the appropriate scale for EJ analyses, as well as information on how to effectively combine the distribution and magnitude of benefits and burdens associated with an analysis into one equation in order to make a final decision. Since circumstances vary greatly by locality, participants suggested that guidance could take the form of case studies that illustrate how various organizations have approached these various issues.

Consistency and coordination among federal partners to develop a systems approach to environmental justice is desirable. The USDOT operating administrations each have their own mode-specific EJ guidance documents, which are intended to be harmonious. However, the specific requirements differ, and for projects that involve multiple funding streams, this can sometimes complicate and unnecessarily delay the review process. Operating administrations should consider coordinating processes in these cases, or, at a minimum, each agency should acknowledge when a funding recipient has already completed a documentation process for another agency. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) circular addresses multi-modal projects, but only for a single grant. This issue is also relevant for projects that receive funding from other Federal agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Consider advancing the state of knowledge through contact with colleges and universities. Transportation agencies should consider contacting local colleges and universities to identify students that are looking for projects and who may be interested in analyzing or collecting data to support EJ efforts.

Image of participants during a presentation at the environmental justice training.

Improving data quality is a significant issue to address. Participants expressed concerns over the potential unreliability of American Community Survey (ACS) data. The new ACS reports provide statistical margins of error for all demographic estimates, and some of the margins of error are unacceptably large. The USDOT should consider holding discussions with the U.S. Census Bureau to identify measures that can be taken to improve the quality of data that are most relevant for EJ.

Opening Remarks and Keynote Address

John Porcari, Deputy Secretary of the USDOT, reminded the audience that transportation connects people to opportunities. The USDOT is committed to incorporating EJ from the very beginning of planning and project development and is visibly investing in livable communities throughout the nation in places like Kansas City, MO (http://www.marc.org/tiger/).

Image of Daria Neal, Deputy Chief for the Federal Compliance and Coordination Section of the U.S. Department of Justice, along with John Porcari, Deputy Secretary of the USDOT.

Daria Neal, Deputy Chief for the Federal Compliance and Coordination Section of the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) Civil Rights Division, pointed out that transportation has played a significant role in the civil rights movement for many years. Today, transportation is a key consideration for EJ because it provides access to jobs, medical resources, schools, and grocery stores.

The Federal government is renewing emphasis on EJ and Title VI, and the Federal Coordination and Compliance Section in the Civil Rights Division at DOJ is working closely with all agencies to strengthen Title VI programs and enforcement. DOJ is encouraging agencies to utilize all of the resources at their disposal, to think creatively and proactively, and to engage partners across the Federal government.

Recent USDOT Policy Changes on Environmental Justice

USDOT Order and Strategy

The new USDOT Order clarifies the distinctions between EJ, Title VI, and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analyses, and expands the definition of minority. Beth Osborne, Deputy Assistant Secretary for USDOT, encouraged participants to communicate this clearly to the public. For more information on the new USDOT Order please visit: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/environmental_justice/ej_at_dot/orders/order_56102a/.

For more information on the updated USDOT Strategy please visit: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/environment/environmental_justice/ej_at_dot/dot_ej_strategy/.

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Order

Greg Nadeau, Deputy Administrator for FHWA, discussed the new FHWA Order, which upholds the original principles and content of the 1998 Order but clarifies the definition of "minority." For more information on the revised FHWA Order please visit: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/legsregs/directives/orders/664023a.cfm.

Federal Transit Administration Circular

Therese McMillan, Deputy Administrator for FTA, announced the publication of the final FTA EJ circular, available in the Federal Register and on FTA's website. To solicit feedback on the circular, FTA conducted an unprecedented level of outreach to communities across the country. FTA now has two parallel documents on EJ and Title VI to clarify the distinctions between the two. Ms. McMillan encouraged grantees to use a more inclusive definition of low-income than the one included in the DOT Order. To access the final FTA EJ Circular please visit: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-17/pdf/2012-17404.pdf

Participant Concerns and Interests

After hearing from USDOT leadership, participants mentioned several areas of interest and opportunities for potential research that may improve the understanding and implementation of EJ. These include:

Break Out Sessions: Current Practices in Environmental Justice (co-moderated by staff from FTA, FHWA, and the Federal Rail Administration (FRA))

Environmental Justice and Civil Rights

In this session participants discussed the intersection of EJ and civil rights, and participants described the ways in which transportation agencies are currently identifying affected or disproportionately impacted communities. Many agencies use census data, but participants suggested that metropolitan planning organization (MPO) data on minority and low-income populations is often better than census data, and state agencies should consider contacting MPOs to corroborate information.

Many planning organizations struggle to get affected populations to attend meetings. Participants suggested creative strategies that have worked for their agencies, including:

Participants listen to another group present during a break out session.
Participants engaged in discussion during a break out session.

Partner with community-based organizations for mutual benefit and combine outreach with existing community events. Participants elaborated on efforts to partner with other organizations, and emphasized the importance of relationships and communication to build trust among EJ communities. One approach is to create a community advisory council, or a council on EJ, to consist of representatives from the community.

Participants also raised several concerns and recommendations. Practitioners require additional guidance on identifying EJ populations and determining appropriate thresholds for "high minority" populations. Tribal governments did not receive any notice of the new EJ Executive Order until five days before its implementation, which they felt was insufficient notice.

Environmental Justice and Implementation

Participants discussed indirect ways that EJ communities may be impacted by service provision or lack thereof. Suggestions included: impacts on property values and safety, traffic diversions, and economic and human health effects. In some locations, paratransit is provided by agencies other than transit agencies, such as the department of social services, but the services may be available for some but not all members of the population. Transportation agencies need to coordinate with these organizations to ensure that EJ issues are considered.

Participants discussed key considerations for the analysis of service expansion and/or cuts, and offered recommendations. Many transit organizations alter routes or cut service when ridership falls below a minimum level. However, agencies should consider whether such routes serve EJ communities. If so, that should be incorporated into the analysis before changes are made. Agencies should map and understand the locations of low-income residents relative to the locations of available jobs, but this can be difficult to meaningfully determine and represent on a high level. Travel surveys can help to address this by gathering information on the timing, origin, and destination of travel.

Many planning organizations struggle to get affected populations to attend meetings.

Participants discussed ways to ensure that construction-related activities do not adversely affect EJ populations. Suggestions included: consider indirect and temporary impacts such as construction vehicle traffic, the temporary relocation of transit routes, and the availability of on-street parking; include stipulations in the construction contract to address potential impacts; and monitor construction activities to ensure compliance with the contract and with the regulations.

Participants also identified challenges. For example, rural agencies are small, and one person may be responsible for multiple functions, meaning that they may not be well-versed in EJ regulations and guidance. Another challenge is that transportation agencies are sometimes reluctant to accept Federal support to begin offering a service, because this may obligate the agency to continue the service in the absence of guaranteed future funding.

Participants take notes during a discussion session.

Participants requested additional guidance on several aspects of EJ implementation. It can be difficult to determine the appropriate scale and the appropriate "thresholds" for EJ analysis, and it can also be challenging to effectively combine the distribution and magnitude of benefits and burdens associated with any decision into one equation in order to make a final decision. Since circumstances vary greatly by locality, participants suggested that this guidance could take the form of case studies that illustrate how various organizations have approached these issues.

With reference to Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21), participants cited the new emphasis on coordination and a systems approach, and pointed out that the USDOT operating administrations each have unique guidance and requirements for EJ.

For projects that involve multiple funding streams, this can sometimes complicate and unnecessarily delay the review process. Operating administrations should consider coordinating processes in these cases, or, at a minimum, each agency should acknowledge when a funding recipient has already completed a documentation process for another agency. The FTA circular addresses multi-modal projects, but only for a single grant. This issue is also relevant for projects that receive funding from other Federal agencies, such as HUD or EPA.

Environmental Justice and Planning and NEPA

In this session participants discussed successes, challenges, and recommendations for addressing EJ in planning and NEPA. The moderators reminded the group of several key points before opening the session to discussion. One key point is that a "categorical exclusion" designation within NEPA does not relieve an agency of the responsibility to assess whether or not a project requires further EJ analysis. Another key point is that EJ must be considered at both the planning and the project level.

Participants reported successes, in that many transportation agencies are now working to address EJ issues at earlier stages in planning and project development than they had in the past. There is an increasing awareness that the concerns of marginalized populations must be considered in any and all planning conversations, and Federal guidance has helped to enhance public outreach efforts and public involvement.

The group also came to consensus regarding some common challenges. Some populations may not engage in public participation for cultural reasons. Neighborhood revitalization can force out existing communities through gentrification. Federal requirements can sometimes stymie the ability of planners to efficiently survey populations, because meeting technical requirements can be a laborious and expensive endeavor.

Participants also shared recommendations with one another. Unconventional outreach strategies can help to garner input from vulnerable populations, including: social media, webinars, contact with local officials, flyers, translated websites, incentives for survey participants, and a toll free telephone number established to solicit comments for a plan or project. Community events are excellent opportunities to interact and engage with affected populations and determine the locations of EJ communities. Agencies should engage with community leaders and civic organizations as much as possible to build relationships and learn about communities. Public participation is vastly improved when the narrative for a project is framed in a thoughtful and compelling way with examples to make discussions more concrete and understandable. Agencies should avoid overpromising as this will erode trust and hinder future public involvement.

Finally, participants offered recommendations for the Federal government. The USDOT and other Federal agencies should consider methods to effectively promote interagency collaboration and the exchange of information. There is a need to continue providing avenues for in-depth discussions among practitioners in order to share best practices and lessons learned on EJ.

Participants share ideas during the public engagement open house.

Public Engagement Open House

Over a working lunch, participants visited 10 tables organized by topic area and engaged in discussions on various aspects of public engagement. The topic areas included:

Building Online Dialogues

A participant shares an idea over the microphone while other participants listen.

An online dialogue is an event hosted on a website to solicit ideas and conversation on a topic. Participants discussed tools for creating online dialogues. According to participants, it is important to have a catalyst, often a notable person in the area, who will participate early in the discussion to stimulate interest and conversation. Participants also stressed that it is important to avoid extremely technical language. One can determine which topics are most important to people based on assessing the number of visitors and the number of views for a given page.

Interaction between In-Person and Virtual Engagement

Participants discussed online forums and in-person meetings, and drew comparisons between the two, noting that many of the same principles apply. In either case, open space for dialogue will ignite conversation, but that space will be most effective when it is thoughtfully structured.

Participants also identified important differences, noting that online conversations will take place over a longer time period and responses will be sporadic. Online anonymity may encourage people to promote comments that are irrelevant to the discussion because comments cannot be traced back to an individual. To mitigate this, participants suggested requiring contributors to complete an online profile. Additionally, dialogue catalysts (or moderators) can strategically steer the conversation back on topic, and/or seed conversations at the beginning of dialogues.

Participants suggested creative tactics to increase community engagement in EJ communities. Community advisory committees encourage people to stay engaged throughout the process.

According to participants, online forums may not always be the best way to reach EJ populations, and in many cases it may still be more effective to use direct mailings, phone calls, and other methods, depending upon the population(s) at hand.

Creative Strategies for Community Engagement

Participants suggested creative tactics to increase community engagement in EJ communities. Community advisory committees encourage people to stay engaged throughout the process. One consensus was that practitioners should to work to make meetings accessible to all by varying the days and times and by providing food, bilingual facilitators, activities for children, and other accommodations. Agencies may also consider offering incentives for participation, such as a free project notebook or advance copies of project materials. Communications should be diverse and context sensitive in order to be effective. For instance, one successful tactic may be to include project information in water bills, but this information would not reach households that rent apartments and therefore do not directly pay water bills. Such a tactic would be most effective if combined with other forms of outreach.

Partnering with Community Colleges

Participants discussed the benefits of working with community colleges, as they can help practitioners to establish relationships with EJ communities. Facilitators at community colleges often already have expertise and connections within an area and facilitators understand community needs and can help communicate them.

Making Social Media Work

According to participants, social media can be used to maintain relationships, distribute information, discuss news, stimulate interest, and direct people to resources where they can find more information. The time commitment is substantial because followers expect rapid responses, and some agencies have funded positions in order to maintain a social media presence. Participants mentioned that providing fast responses can be challenging because anything that is publicized must be approved by public affairs offices. Successful organizations have established systems in order to approve and post social media messages in a timely fashion.

Participants described tactics for encouraging EJ populations to "like" or "follow" a social media page, including: text messages, key contacts in communities who can "retweet" information on Twitter, and the use of conversational and accessible language.

Imagine KC: A Live Televised Forum

The discussion at this table focused on a major challenge: many people will willingly participate in project-related meetings, but most will not attend planning-related meetings.

It is especially challenging to get the public to take interest in scenario planning because of the long time horizons involved, and EJ communities, in particular, have many more immediate problems that compete for attention. The "Imagine KC" live broadcast was developed for a vision plan on sustainability, and reached thousands of households. Participants discussed the ways in which such an approach helped to garner more attention and reach a wider audience. Participants also discussed their own approaches and shared tips and techniques, such as holding targeted focus group meetings in preparation for a larger meeting.

Engaging Through Charrettes

A charrette is a collaborative method for consulting with stakeholders through the use of discussion sessions designed to stimulate creativity and integrate diverse perspectives. According to participants, a charrette should be at least two days in length in order to be effective, because the iterative process requires time to fully develop. Participants discussed the importance of advance planning and the value of conveying information visually so that it is accessible to people immediately. Facilitators must be skillful to ensure that even the quietest individuals are able to share their perspectives, and the organizers should consider training the facilitators beforehand. Participants also identified challenges inherent to charrettes. For experts, it can be difficult to translate concepts into understandable terms for lay people. It can also take a while before people really become comfortable and are able to freely share ideas. Participants identified the National Charrette Institute (http://www.charretteinstitute.org/) as a valuable resource.

Tracking Public Participation: The "So What" Factor

The consensus in this session was that public participation cannot be effectively managed if it is not effectively tracked. At the same time, participants agreed that it can be challenging to design and implement tracking efforts that produce meaningful results. Practitioners would appreciate additional guidance and resources on this topic.

Participants suggested multiple tools and approaches for consideration, including: spreadsheet programs; database programs (which allow for more effective queries than spreadsheets); programs that link social media accounts to facilitate tracking; a logic models for public engagement; and surveys to track which demographic groups prefer information in which forms.

Participants also identified recommendations and acknowledged challenges associated with those recommendations. For instance, it is helpful but difficult to collect demographic data on meeting participants to understand which segments of the population have participated and address the gaps. Tracking EJ activities is often delegated to one office within an organization, but everyone within an organization needs to maintain awareness. Tracking and analyses should be coordinated across different jurisdictions, but this can be difficult to accomplish in practice.

Using Electronic Polling with Scenario Planning

At this table, attendees discussed the use of live electronic polling for in-person scenario planning meetings, and participated in a demonstration of the technology. One suggestion was to develop general polls early in the process and more specific polls later on in the process.

Re-energizing Environmental Justice Communities in New Ways

The Broward MPO in Florida presented some innovative projects and strategies from their current portfolio (www.browardMPO.org), which sparked discussion amongst participants. The Broward MPO uses a "transportation outreach planner," designed in conjunction with Florida International University, to produce demographic reports, develop a community background report, and then inform the creation of a public outreach strategy. Participants discussed the advantages of developing partnerships with advocacy groups and social service agencies so that transportation practitioners can attend and present at the meetings that these organizations conduct.

Case Studies and Perspectives on Environmental Justice

Glenn Robinson, Senior Researcher, Morgan State University

Glenn Robinson discussed the historical context for EJ, described current efforts and trends, and highlighted a number of key reference materials. In particular, he emphasized the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 710, "Practical Approaches for Involving Traditionally Underserved Populations in Transportation Decisionmaking" (http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/166872.aspx), and urged the audience to refer to this document.

Christopher Coes, Managing Director, LOCUS, Smart Growth America

Christopher Coes discussed the challenge of gentrification. He explained that there is a need to replicate walkable urban communities so that the supply of such neighborhoods will meet the rising demand. Otherwise, low-income populations will be forced out of these areas.

He also discussed the importance of public involvement and referenced Decision Commons (http://decisioncommons.org/) as one example of an interactive decisionmaking tool that allows community members, council members, and developers to interact electronically throughout a planning process. He also referenced the use of online dialogues to allow a community to voice opinions on proposed development.

Mr. Coes suggested several options in the near term that can help to create affordable housing options in communities, including: inclusionary zoning through tax credits and vouchers, impact fees instead of subsidies, and the use of value-capture to engage the private sector in transportation planning.

Anita Hairston, Senior Associate, Policy Link

Anita Hairston emphasized the importance of transportation in providing access to opportunities for EJ communities. She implored practitioners to ensure that projects are driven by outcomes, and to prioritize projects that reduce per capita transportation costs while improving access, safety, and air quality. She also encouraged organizations to collaborate and to share EJ tools and strategies with one another while building lasting partnerships. In particular, she highlighted the synergy at the Federal level between USDOT, HUD, and EPA. She closed by describing the importance of engagement and reminded the audience that it is important to be clear with communities about how their input will affect a process.

Tools and Data to Improve Environmental Justice Analyses

Patricia Hu, Associate Administrator and Director, Bureau of Transportation Statistics

Patricia Hu provided an overview of national transportation data sources that can be used to support environmental justice analyses. She discussed the following resources:

New American Fact Finder http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml), a product of the U.S. Census Bureau, which supplies population, housing, economic, and geographic information;

The Federal Highway Administration's National Household Travel Survey (http://nhts.ornl.gov/index.shtml), the only resource at the national level that links data on households and travel behavior with socio-economic data and neighborhood characteristics;

Intermodal Passenger Connectivity Database (http://www.transtats.bts.gov/databaseinfo.asp?db_id=640&link=0), which provides multi-modal data on intercity terminal access and availability;

State Facts and Figures (http://gis.rita.dot.gov/StateFacts/), which supplies state-by-state transportation facts, comparisons, and rankings for categories such as Infrastructure, Fatalities and Injuries, Distracted Driving and Safety Equipment, Freight Volumes and Values, Passenger Travel , Economy and Finance , and Energy and Environment;

National Transit Database (http://www.ntdprogram.gov/ntdprogram/), a source for information and statistics on the transit systems of the United States; and

National Transportation Atlas Database (http://www.rita.dot.gov/bts/sites/rita.dot.gov.bts/files/publications/north_american_transportation_atlas_data/index.html), a geographic database of transportation facilities, networks, and associated infrastructure, which is most useful at the national level, but may also have major applications at regional, state, and
local scales.

Scott Parris, Information Technology Specialist, Environmental Protection Agency

Scott Parris presented information on EJView (http://epamap14.epa.gov/ejmap/entry.html), a web-based tool developed by EPA. This application contains demographic, health, environmental, and facility data from EPA and other Federal agencies and can be used to display information related to EJ. It is designed for a wide audience including government, academia, and the public, and does not require any knowledge of geographic information systems (GIS). The program allows users to draw custom study areas and filter demographic information. Filtering is useful for displaying areas where an EJ population of interest exceeds a given threshold (as a percentage of the overall population). The interface also includes EPA grant programs. EJView does not include a great deal of data that is specific to transportation, but it does include freight data. EPA is currently working on developing a new EJ tool, which will allow users to export information for use in other GIS applications. For more information contact EJMap@epa.gov.

Discussion on Tools and Data for Environmental Justice Analyses

One participant identified another valuable data resource, the census transportation planning products program (http://ctpp.transportation.org/Pages/default.aspx). This special tabulation of ACS data is available nationally. Other participants expressed concerns over the potential unreliability of ACS data. The new ACS reports provide statistical margins of error for all demographic estimates, and some of the margins of error are unacceptably large. Practitioners must evaluate for themselves whether or not to base decisions on ACS data. One participant mentioned a case in which it was unclear whether or not public documents should be translated based on ACS data. Facing uncertainty, the agency decided to translate the documents to ensure compliance.

New Research in Environmental Justice

David Kuehn, co-chair of the Transportation Research Board EJ committee, described new directions for EJ research and highlighted new tools and approaches:

New monitoring technologies allow improved measurement of air quality, noise, and other impacts. Sensors are smaller, less expensive, and consume less power than in the past, so it is now feasible to install sensors in more locations to collect better data;

GIS and global positioning systems provide the ability to analyze and display results geographically and identify locations precisely and automatically;

Data integration and data mining is now accessible to a wider audience beyond research scientists through new mechanisms that allow users to gather and analyze disparate and unorganized data; and Mobile platforms are much cheaper than in the past, allowing researchers to track and record travel data efficiently.

Mr. Kuehn discussed how all of these advances have leveled access to information and improved the possibilities for the following:

Community-based participatory research in transportation planning;

Open access to transportation data through application programming interfaces which allow the public to query data that was previously only available to agency leadership and board members;

Enhanced mitigation monitoring, as communities are better able to serve, watch and monitor mitigation measures to ensure that they are working; and

Local capacity building, as the ability to collect and access information contributes to a sense of empowerment.

He closed by reminding the audience that transportation is about benefits, and EJ is inherently multi-disciplinary. There is a continued need to share research results and coordinate on research needs. To learn about research plans and research needs statements, visit www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/step and www.trb.org. Everyone has an opportunity to submit ideas or research needs statements for consideration.

Reflections from the Day

Beth Osborne, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy at the USDOT, and Bryna Helfer, Director of Public Engagement at the USDOT, led participants in a discussion of the key themes from the day and solicited feedback. For details, please refer to the "Key Themes and Findings" on pages two and three of this document.

Appendix A: Agenda

8:00 - 9:00

Registration

9:00 - 9:15

Welcome and Introductions
John Porcari, Deputy Secretary, USDOT

9:15 - 9:45

Keynote Address
Daria Neal, Deputy Chief, Federal Coordination and
Compliance, Department of Justice

9:45 - 9:55

Break

9:55 - 10:35

Recent USDOT Policy Changes on Environmental Justice

  • USDOT Order and Strategy - Beth Osborne, Deputy Assistant Secretary, USDOT
  • FHWA Order - Greg Nadeau, Deputy Administrator, FWHA
  • FTA Circular - Therese McMillan, Deputy Administrator, FTA

10:35 - 11:30

Break Out Sessions: Current Practices in Environmental Justice

  • Environmental Justice and Civil Rights
  • Environmental Justice and Implementation
  • Environmental Justice and Planning and NEPA

11:30 - 1:00

Public Engagement Open House (working lunch)

1:00 - 2:00

Case Studies and Perspectives on Environmental Justice

  • Glenn Robinson, Senior Researcher, Morgan State University
  • Christopher Coes, Managing Director for LOCUS, Smart Growth America
  • Anita Hairston, Senior Associate, Policy Link

2:00 - 2:50

Tools and Data to Improve Environmental Justice Analyses

  • Patricia Hu, Associate Administrator and Director, Bureau of Transportation Statistics
  • Scott Parris, Information Technology Specialist, Environmental Protection Agency

2:50 - 3:00

Break

3:00 - 3:15

New Research in Environmental Justice
David Kuehn, co-chair of the Transportation Research Board EJ committee

3:15 - 4:00

Reflections from the Day
Beth Osborne, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Transportation Policy, USDOT
Bryna Helfer, Director of Public Engagement, USDOT

Updated: 09/22/2014
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