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Noise Compatible Planning

Workshops

NCP Workshop PowerPoint Presentation in HTML format

Also available in PowerPoint (13.7Mb)

I. Implementing Noise Compatible Land Use

Lesson 1
Roadway Noise and FHWA Guidelines

Federal Highway Administration

II. Roadway Travel

This slide shows several automobiles entering a multi-lane roadway via an on-ramp. There are several vehicle types on the roadway and urban development in the background.

III. What is Noise?

Loud or annoying, unwanted sound is noise. A photograph of a multi-lane roadway with travel in both directions is emanating sound waves to the photograph of a human ear.Sound waves the photograph of a human ear.

IV. Negative Effects of Sound

V. Common Noise Levels

Jet aircraft take off Uncomfortably loud 120 dBA
Lawnmower , Vacuum Moderately loud 70 dBA
Library Very quiet 30 dBA

VI. Who's Responsible?

VII. Noise Assessments

VIII. Federal Guidelines for Noise Abatement

IX. Section 772.5: Definitions

X. Section 772.13(b) Federal Participation

XI. FHWA Approach to Roadway Noise

XII. Source Control: Noise Sources for Heavy Trucks

A heavy truck has many sub-sources which contribute to the overall sound levels, such as engine, fan, gears, intake, exhaust, and tires.

XIII. Measuring Sound

XIV. The TNM Model

The FHWA Traffic Noise Model is a state-of-the-art prediction tool used to predict future noise levels for highway projects. The FHWA Traffic Noise Model is a state-of-the-art prediction tool used to predict future noise levels for highway projects.

XV. Noise Criteria

Exterior (residences, schools, parks, and churches) Leq 65 dBA
Exterior (commercial) Leq 70 dBA
Interior Leq 50 dBA is used

XVI. N C P Mitigation Strategies

Main NCP strategies include use of open space to preclude development, location of non-noise sensitive land uses near roadways, and building orientation and design to minimize or avoid negative noise effects. Main NCP strategies include use of open space to preclude development, location of non-noise sensitive land uses near roadways, and building orientation and design to minimize or avoid negative noise effects.

XVII. Residential - Commercial

A commercial land use with a large parking lot is located between a roadway and a residential land use.

XVIII. Noise Reducing Construction Design

A residential structure is located near a roadway. To minimize noise levels entering the facade, no windows are located on the structure that face the roadway.

XIX. Implementing Noise Compatible Land Use

Lesson 2

Overview Noise Compatible Land Use Planning

XX. Lesson 2: Overview Noise Compatible Planning

XXI. What Constitutes NCP?

NCP addresses potential highway noise before problems occur

Appropriate development that can accommodate roadway noise is encouraged next to highways

XXII. Why Talk About Noise Compatible Land Use Planning?

By avoiding noise impacts, more highway dollars can be allocated to other projects and avoid construction of noise walls, which may impact some communities visually or in other ways. Several noise barriers which visually impact nearby land uses are shown.

XXIII. PURPOSE

XXIV. Commercial, Retail, Office

These types of land uses are non-noise sensitive and may be located near roadways for better visibility.

XXV. Open Space

The use of open space near roadways can be valuable for utilities, recreational areas, or to preclude development and allow for roadway widening.

XXVI. Building Orientation or Construction Materials

A house layout that locates noisier rooms nearer to the roadway and provides extra insulation to minimize interior noise impacts.

XXVII. Setback

By providing a few hundred feet of setback adjacent to a highway to preclude development will avoid noise impacts since noise levels dissipate as one moves further from the noise source.

XXVIII. Benefits of NCP

Undesirable effects of highway traffic noise are eliminated or reduced by encouraging less noise sensitive land uses next to highways

XXIX. Benefits of NCLUP (cont)

XXX. Hindrances to Implementing NCP

This slide shows several of the hindrances to implementing a NCP program, such as being cost prohibitive, zoning and ordinance conflicts, and other intergovernmental issues.

XXXI. Role of Leaders and Policy Professionals

Encourage:

XXXII. Implementing Noise Compatible Land Use

Lesson 3

Noise Compatible Reduction Techniques - Physical Responses

XXXIII. Lesson 3 - Objective

XXXIV. Key Terms for Noise Measurements

XXXV. Key Variables Affecting Noise

XXXVI. Distance Creates A Buffer

The use of open space between source and receive allows for noise to reduce with distance, also called a buffer zone.

XXXVII. Elevated or Depressed Roadways Affect Sound Patterns

Raising or lowering a roadway relative to nearby receivers can affect the noise level

XXXVIII. Design and Construction Characteristics

XXXIX. Acoustical Site Planning

XL. Single Family with Earth Berm

A single family home's windows are blocked by an intervening berm and wall combination while a two-story house's windows are not blocked.

XLI. Acoustical Construction: Double Pane Doors and Windows

Sound proofing of homes, typically by using double-paned windows and solid-core doors, can greatly reduce interior noise levels "Soundproofing greatly reduces
interior noise penetration"
Sound proofing of homes, typically by using double-paned windows and solid-core doors, can greatly reduce interior noise levels

XLII. Acoustical Construction: Thicker Sound Resistant Walls - No Highway Side Windows

The use of thicker building materials, such as concrete and masonry brick, along with minimizing the number of windows exposed to noise sources, can reduce interior noise levels.

XLIII. Acoustical Construction: Thicker Sound Resistant Walls at Rear with Front Windows

A house, with a courtyard located in the front yard, shields receivers from noise. A house, with a courtyard located in the front yard, shields receivers from noise.

XLIV. Insulation materials

Use of thicker or better insulation materials can reduce the amount of noise that enters a home from the exterior. Acoustic Vinyl Barrier 1lb Use of thicker or better insulation materials can reduce the amount of noise that enters a home from the exterior. Acoustic Vinyl Barrier 2lb QUIETBARRIER™

XLV. Google Search - Noise Insulation

An online search will result in numerous "hits" on insulating materials to soundproof homes.

XLVI. Lesson 4

XLVII. Lesson 4 - Objective

Familiarize participants with the variety of tools available to local governments in support of NCP

XLVIII. Strategies for Municipalities

XLIX. Authorities to Mandate Implementation of Noise Compatible Principles

Local Governments

Municipal Governments

L. Setbacks and Buffer Zones

Setbacks and buffer zones can provide adequate distance for noise impacts to be avoided, and can also be used for utility location or other recreational uses.

LI. Place specific language on legal documents & plats

City of San Antonio's subdivision plats state:

The City of San Antonio in Texas has subdivision plats that state the developer is responsible for sound abatement or noise impact avoidance (para.). "For residential development directly adjacent to State right of way, the Developer shall be responsible for adequate set-back and/or sound abatement measures for future noise mitigation."

LII. Adopt Land Use Compatible Standards Into City Codes

  • Building codes
  • Landscaping & screening requirements
  • Noise ordinance
  • Zoning Ordinance
  • Comprehensive Plan/General Plan
  • Major Thoroughfare Plan

LIII. Examples of Communities with Land Use Compatible Planning Practices

  • Pennsylvania
  • Montana
  • Arizona
  • City of San Antonio
  • City of Huntington Beach
  • City of Gilbert Arizona

LIV. Class Conclusion

We Hope You Are Encouraged !

Updated: 07/14/2011
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