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Traffic Noise Model: Frequently Asked Questions FAQs

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  1. Is there a character limit in naming my TNM run?

    TNM may not open a run with a combined path and run name exceeding 87 characters in length. In addition, if you wish to compute contours, then the combined pathname of your TNM run and every folder in its path must satisfy DOS's maximum of 8.3 characters and DOS's restriction against some characters (such as "spaces"). For example, 12345678.123 is a valid file name. Therefore, the run must be saved directly on the C: drive when calculating contours.

  2. How do I delete unwanted TNM runs?

    To delete a TNM run, you may delete the subdirectory from a file manager like Windows Explorer. Be sure you do not have runs saved as subdirectories of the run, or they will be deleted also.

Import DXF/Stamina

  1. Does TNM import DXF Point Objects?

    TNM does not import DXF points, such as potential receiver locations. As a work-around, the user may connect points with a polyline in the CAD program prior to import, then after import, snap-digitize TNM receivers to the DXF points in the polyline.

  2. When I import Metric DXF files in TNM the background units are incorrect. How do I fix this?

    (Applies to TNM versions 1.1 and above)
    TNM has a bug with metric DXF file importing. To use these DXF files:

    1. Open or create a METRIC TNM run
    2. Import DXF file
      1. Select Import as Background
      2. Select FEET as units
    3. Register DXF Background (Under Setup)
      1. click 3 points on the screen
      2. when the dialog opens, re-type the coordinates in the left boxes into the right boxes.
      3. when all coordinates are re-typed hit OK
    4. Recalculate full view (Under View)

    The background units will now be in metric units correctly.

    To import a different DXF file repeat steps 2 to 4. If you need to re-open the TNM run repeat these steps each time you re-open the file.

  3. My DXF file is about a 6 MB file. Is that too big?

    Your DXF files should be fine up to about 20 MB if it is imported as a background. If you are importing it as objects, we do not recommend DXF sizes above 3MB. TNM has a difficult time processing DXF files above this size limit.

  4. What's the difference between importing my DXF file as Objects and as Background?

    Importing a DXF file as Objects means all objects and their associated attributes are preserved. You then convert the imported DXF objects to TNM objects. Importing a DXF file as Background is much faster and means all objects and text are imported as a graphical depiction, commonly referred to as a "background" or "wallpaper." You then create new TNM objects by digitizing/tracing over the DXF background. Refer to Section 4.7.2 in the User's Guide for more information.

  5. What DXF objects can TNM import?

    Table 1 in the TNM User's Guide Addendum shows the items TNM Version 2.0 can and cannot import.

  6. How do I import large DXF files as Objects?

    For large DXF files, importing as Objects will take longer than importing as Background. You may want to "freeze" DXF file layers, import, and convert the files, incrementally. This is because TNM creates intermediate objects during import as Objects that can take up memory and slow down the program. (Consult your CAD program manual for details on CAD layers). Refer to Section 4.7.2 in the User's Guide for more information.

  7. I imported a DXF file. Why can't I see anything in the Plan View?

    In the Edit menu, select the Select Everything menu item. If still nothing is displayed, then all DXF items which TNM is not able to import as Objects may have been placed in the Background. In the View menu, select Show/Hide and click on the DXF Background checkbox. Then click on the OK button. Refer to Section 6.2 in the User's Guide for more information.

  8. Why can't I import my Stamina file?

    TNM will only import official STAMINA 2.0/OPTIMA input files. These files have a .DAT extension. The example Stamina file located in the \Examples\Results directory is an example of the official Stamina 2.0 format.

  9. What happened to the alpha factors in my imported STAMINA files?

    STAMINA alpha factors are not imported since TNM uses an entirely new methodology for computing ground effects (see Appendix D on Pages 147-149 of the TNM User's Guide).

  10. How do I import shielding factors in my STAMINA files?

    (Applies to TNM versions 1.0, 1.0b, 1.1, 2.0 only)
    After selecting File, Import Stamina-2.0 Input Files from the menu, be sure to select the Import Shielding Factors check box in the resultant import window. TNM will import the shielding factors from your STAMINA files as adjustment factors. Refer to Section 4.7.1 in the User's Guide for more information. Please also note that TNM Version 2.0 imports STAMINA shielding factors as positive adjustment factors, such that the shielding factors (and adjustment factors) are added to the sound level results. Users should manually flip the signs of the adjustment factors in their STAMINA file if they wish to have the absolute values of the shielding factors subtracted from the sound level results. This has been addressed in TNM Version 2.1.

  11. How do I import shielding factors in my STAMINA files with TNM Version 2.1 and above?

    (Applies to TNM version 2.1 and above)
    After selecting File, Import Stamina-2.0 Input Files from the menu, be sure to select the Import Shielding Factors check box in the resultant import window. TNM will import the shielding factors from your STAMINA files as adjustment factors. Refer to Section 4.7.1 in the User's Guide for more information. Beginning with TNM Version 2.1, positive STAMINA shielding factors are imported as negative "adjustment factors," such that the shielding factors are subtracted from the sound level results (negative adjustment factors are added). Negative STAMINA shielding factors are imported as positive "adjustment factors," such that the absolute values of the shielding factors are added to the sound level results (positive adjustment factors are added).

  12. Why can't I open the example files?

    The files contained in the TNM/Examples directory are examples for import into TNM. Create a new run in TNM, then import the desired example file, instead of opening it.

  13. Can you import multiple DXF files "as background" in TNM Versions 2.0 and later?

    (Applies to TNM version 2.0 and above)
    Yes, you would have to work with one DXF file at a time. Import a single DXF file, create all the objects you need, and then import a second file on top of or next to the objects.

  14. Can I simultaneously import more than one DXF file as objects?

    Do not import more than one DXF file as objects at one time. After using each DXF file, File, Close the run, then File, Open it again, and then import the next DXF.

Open

  1. What is a TNM "run"?

    A TNM run is actually the name of a subdirectory containing two files generated by TNM (OBJECTS.IDX and OBJECTS.DAT). You decide the name of the run when you first create the run in TNM. A TNM run stores everything about that run, including the input data, the sound level results, and remembered barrier analyses and parallel barrier designs. Because a TNM run is, in itself, a subdirectory, TNM will let you create a run anywhere, including within another run. However, note that "nested" runs do not inherit anything from their "parent" runs.

  2. Can I open runs created in older versions of TNM in the most recent version of TNM?

    Any run created using older versions of TNM (e.g., Versions 1.0, 1.0a, 1.0b, and 1.1) can be opened in TNM 2.0 and above. TNM 2.0 (and above) will ask you if you would like a backup copy of the run automatically saved during the opening process. If you do not save a backup copy of the run, a run opened by TNM 2.0 (and above) will be permanently converted and will not be able to be opened in previous versions of TNM.

  3. Can I open runs created in the most recent version of TNM with older versions of TNM?

    Any run created/opened using TNM Version 2.0 and above will open in Version 1.1, but not in older versions of TNM (e.g., Versions 1.0, 1.0a, and 1.0b).

  4. What does an "unable to find master dictionary" error mean when I try to create a new run or open an existing run?

    It means someone has moved or renamed your TNM folder without updating the WINDOWS system file, TNM.INI (or TNM2.INI for Version 2.0/2.1/2.5). The TNM.INI file, usually found in your Windows or NT directory, needs to be edited to reflect where the TNM folder has been moved to or renamed.

  5. Why doesn't my run open?

    In some instances, TNM will not open a run whose name contains greater than 87 characters (including the path). The workaround is to move the run out of embedded subdirectories and closer to the root C drive. For example, if your run is located in C:\subdir1\subdir2\subdir3\subdir4\subdir5\...\run, move it to c:\run.

  6. Why should I breakdown my run into smaller runs?

    Smaller runs mean shorter run-times. In addition, a large run usually contains many input objects over large distances, where certain receivers are unaffected by remote roadways, barriers, etc. As a result, you might want to enter all input into a "master" run and then split the master run into smaller sub-runs for computation. In this manner, you can duplicate selected portions of the master run in smaller individual runs, each relevant to a single barrier design, for actual calculation and barrier analysis.

  7. What kinds of files can be imported into TNM?

    You can import DXF files created by CAD programs, such as Intergraph MicroStation® and AutoCAD®, and STAMINA 2.0/OPTIMA input files, which are usually identified with a .DAT file extension. TNM comes with one example of each file type. You supply actual files for your own projects. You may put these files anywhere you wish on your hard drive, or even on floppy disks. You may also give them any extension you wish. TNM recognizes them by their content, not their extension.

  8. How can I print my input?

    To print your input/output data, open the appropriate input/output table in the Tables menu. Then select Print in the File menu or Print Tables in the Tables menu. You cannot print input dialogs; they are only for entering input data.

  9. How do I use the Set Print Scale when printing in TNM?

    The Set Print Scale allows you to setup a ruler unit equal to a map distance. The "1 inch" (or "1 cm") actually means the distance between tick marks on the plot axes, not necessarily one inch (or one centimeter) on the paper. Clicking on the box just below the "fit to page" box activates this scale capability. You can check the scale by using File, Print Preview. If a set scale is not entered, TNM will automatically set a scale such that the view shown in the active window is maximized for printing on one sheet. Also, note that Printer Margins do not affect the location of the axes, which are fixed, just the location, and thus size of the plotted objects.

Updated: 07/15/2011
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