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Rails-with-Trails: Lessons Learned

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SECTION V: Design
Trail-Roadway Crossings,
At-Grade Trail-Roadway Crossings

FIGURES: 5.35, 5.36, 5.37, 5.38, 5.39, and 5.40

This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a roadway. There is a major 4-way intersection, 'less than 350 feet' to right of a set of railroad tracks (running vertically), which supports both a 'Major Arterial' (running horizontally) and an 'Arterial' (running vertically). Just to the left of the tracks there is a 'Shared Use Path' which also runs vertically. Just before the the path crosses the road there is a 'Stop (R1)' sign. At the intersection there is a 'Barricade with sign: Pedestrians and Bikes Use Crosswalk (R95, R96, R-96B)'. There also is a '10ft wide Sidewalk' which gives the option for the user to cross the tracks towards the intersection on the right. See Basic Criteria below for further details.

FIGURE 5.35 Roadway crossing type 1 (reroute to nearest intersection)

Basic Criteria:
Signalized intersection with crosswalk within 350' of path2
Crossing Major Arterial with high ADT (See ADT vs Ped plot)3

Sources:

  1. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 1988
  2. Institute of Transportation Engineers, Transportation and Land Development, 1988
  3. Investigation of Exposure Based Accident Areas: Crosswalks, Local Street, and Arterials, Knoblauch, 1987
This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a roadway. There is a major 4-way intersection, 'Greater than 350 feet' to right of a set of railroad tracks (running vertically), which supports both a 'Major Arterial' (running horizontally) and an 'Arterial' (running vertically). Just to the left of the tracks there is a 'Shared Use Path' which also runs vertically. This path has sharp curves before the 'Major Arterial' crossing.  Just before the the path crosses the road there is a 'Stop (R1)' sign. There is a 'Bike Xing (W79)' sign on the side of the roadway '100ft' from the RWT crossings, visible to approaching vehicular traffic. There is also a 'Pedestrian Signal (Actuated with Push Button)' available for users on either side of the RWT corridor who are trying to cross the 'Major Arterial'. See Basic Criteria below for further details.

FIGURE 5.36 Roadway crossing type 2 (new signal)

Basic Criteria:
Ped volume is 50-100 per hour1
Crossing Major Arterial with High ADT (See ADT vs Ped plot)3
Signalized intersection with crosswalk within 350' of path2

Sources:

  1. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 1988
  2. Institute of Transportation Engineers, Transportation and Land Development, 1988
  3. Investigation of Exposure Based Accident Areas: Crosswalks, Local Street, and Arterials, Knoblauch, 1987



This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a 'Minor Arterial'. There is a 4-way intersection, 'Greater than 600 feet For Midblock' to the right of the RWT corridor (running vertically), which supports the 2 'Minor Arterials'. Just to the left of the tracks there is a 'Shared Use Path' which also runs vertically. Just before the the path crosses the road there is a 'Stop (R1)' sign. There is a 'Bike Xing (W79)' sign on the side of the roadway '100ft' from the RWT crossings, visible to approaching vehicular traffic. See Basic Criteria below for further details.

FIGURE 5.37 Roadway crossing type 3 (unprotected crossing)

Basic Criteria:3
Speed Limit < 45mph
Adequate Stopping Sight Distance
Crosswalk Adequately Illuminated
Low ADT (See ADT vs. Ped Plot)

Sources:

  1. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices, 1988
  2. Institute of Transportation Engineers, Transportation and Land Development, 1988
  3. Investigation of Exposure Based Accident Areas: Crosswalks, Local Street, and Arterials, Knoblauch, 1987
This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a roadway. The RWT corridor runs horizontally. Just prior to where the tracks cross the road the path turns sharply to the left (up) crossing the tracks; or you can turn right (down) and follow the sidewalk parallel to the road. There is a 'Bikeway directional signal' at this point as well as an automatic gate keeping users from crossing the tracks while a train is approaching. At the other side of track crossing the user can continue (up) on the sidewalk or cross the road at the crosswalk. There is a 'Stop (R1)' sign, a 'Hwy Xing' sign and 'Bikeway directional signage' at this crossing. On the other side of the crosswalk there is a 'Stop (R1)' sign for users coming from the other direction as well as a 'Hwy Xing' sign and a fence to separate the path from the tracks. Also after the crossing there is a 'No Motor Vehicles' sign. There is a 'Bike Xing (W79)' sign on the side of the roadway and a signal gate before the RWT crossing. See Basic Criteria below for further details.

FIGURE 5.38 Roadway and track crossing




This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a roadway. The RWT corridor runs vertically with the 'Shared Use Path' to the left of the tracks. At the road crossing there are the letters 'A' through 'D' which show the 4 options users of the path have at the road crossing. Letter 'A' points to the right indicating that the user can turn left to cross the tracks rather than continuing straight and crossing the road as the letter 'C' depicts. There is no gate before the tracks with this option but there is a gate for people approaching from the other side of the tracks. The letter 'B' indicates the user can cross one lane but then turn left onto the second lane of the roadway and cross the tracks. There is a gate which blocks the road before the track crossing. Letter 'D' indicates the user can choose to turn right onto the road going away from the tracks.

FIGURE 5.39 Summary of potential trail user movements

A-D:
Potential movements at intersection

Note:
In an effort to simplify the figure to show the design concept, not all pavement marking or other required traffic control devices are shown.

This graphic depicts a recommended design for an RWT crossing at a roadway. The RWT corridor runs vertically with the 'Shared Use Path' to the left of the tracks. The road crosses the tracks at a 45 degree angle. The 'Shared Use Path' curves sharply so that it crosses the road at a 90 degree angle and a marked crosswalk. There is a 'Stop (R1)' sign along the path just prior to the road crossing; one on each side. Along the road at each approach there is a 'Bike Xing' sign and a gate.

FIGURE 5.40 Angled intersection with roadway

Updated: 02/11/2014
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