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Sources of Matching Funds

The matching funds used along byways have come from a variety of sources. Generally speaking, the three categories are local, State and Federal funds.[1] Table 4 and Figure 3 illustrate the distribution of matching funds across the three main categories in each of the years from 1999 to 2006. Across these eight years, almost 75 percent of the matching funds came from non-Federal and non-State sources. States provided 21 percent of the total matching funds; and the Federal government, through special land management agency provisions, provided 5 percent.

Table 4 : Matching Funds by Year and Type
Matching Funds Federal State Other Total
Match %
by year
Matching Funds Match %
by year
Matching Funds Match %
by year
Matching Funds
1999 $67,202 0.5% $18,350 0.1% $14,146,389 99.4% $14,231,941
2000 $65,676 0.3% $52,232 0.3% $20,308,631 99.4% $20,426,539
2001 $2,774,376 12.7% $4,243,930 19.5% $14,789,584 67.8% $21,807,890
2002 $1,337,210 11.3% $3,689,913 31.1% $6,832,223 57.6% $11,859,346
2003 $141,235 1.0% $6,030,411 44.7% $7,328,514 54.3% $13,500,160
2004 $395,670 4.6% $3,952,343 45.7% $4,303,113 49.7% $8,651,126
2005 $611,960 4.1% $2,980,833 20.0% $11,320,017 75.9% $14,912,810
2006 $715,418 4.2% $4,790,688 28.2% $11,482,901 67.6% $16,989,007
Total $6,108,747 5.0% $25,758,700 21.0% $90,511,372 74.0% $122,378,819

Figure 3 : Matching Funds by Year and Type

Column chart depicting the data from Table 4. For each year, a wide column indicates the total amount of matching funds provided, and three narrow bars indicate the amount of matching funds from federal, state and other sources.

There were variations in that pattern on a year-to-year basis. In some years, the Federal portion rose to between 11% and 13%. In the same manner, during the last several years, the State matching sources provided between 20% and 45% of the total matching dollars leveraged by the National Scenic Byways Program grants. Local sources provided 99% of matching funds in 1999 and 2000. That figure has since fluctuated between 50% and 75% per year.

Matching funds by federal agencies

From 1999 through 2006, federal agencies other than FHWA provided a total of $6.93 million in funding to match National Scenic Byways grant funds. The primary agencies involved to date are the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Land Management.

The U.S.D.A. Forest Service has accounted for 63% of the total federal agency matching funds and providing over $4.3 million toward total project costs for byways where the USFS was a partner.

Table 5 : Matching Funds by Federal Agencies
Year USFS NPS FWS BIA BLM Other Total
1999 $48,522 $48,522
2000 $64,676 $8,500 $73,176
2001 $1,743,376 $20,000 $1,000,000 $13,000 $2,776,376
2002 $972,950 $400,000 $74,063 $1,447,013
2003 $66,383 $34,655 $1,000 $8,794 $500 $111,332
2004 $361,140 $350,000 $200,000 $911,140
2005 $532,760 $257,450 $5,000 $45,000 $840,210
2006 $550,014 $84,904 $24,250 $10,500 $53,700 $723,368
Total $4,339,821 $1,147,009 $1,030,250 $10,500 $128,994 $274,563 $6,931,137

Figure 4: Matching Funds by Federal Agencies

Stacked bar chart illustrating the data in Table 5, Matching Funds by Federal Agencies. Each bar represents a year, and each color within the bars represents a federal agency funding source (USFS, NPS, FWS, BIA, BLM, and Other).

Directions for the Future

The National Scenic Byways Program has leveraged significantly higher amounts of match funding than the minimum 20 percent required. This has resulted in a much larger impact for the Program. The nature of projects with matches exceeding 20 percent should be examined more carefully in order to provide ideas and guidance to local groups on maximizing the number of financial partners and match levels for all projects.

It should, however, also be confirmed that these higher match levels were the result of successful local fund raising and financing, and not the result of local groups receiving fewer grant funds than expected. In other words, groups might have prepared an application, assembled the matches in preparation of a full grant award, and then found that their actual award was less than expected. The result would be match amounts exceeding the 20 percent level.

  1. Since TEA-21, under Title 23 U.S.C. Section 162(f), in the case of any scenic byway project along a public road that provides access to or within Federal or Indian land, a Federal land management agency may use funds authorized for use by the agency as the non-Federal share. ^ back
Updated: 09/03/2013
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