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Interpretive Information

Development and provision of tourist information to the public, including interpretive information about a scenic byway, 23 U.S.C. 162(c)(7).

Principles

  1. National Scenic Byways Program funds may be used for the development and implementation of an interpretive plan, including tourist or interpretive information directly related to the byway and the intrinsic qualities that support the byway's designation.

  2. National Scenic Byways Program funds may be used to develop and provide information on

    • the State's or Indian tribe's total network of byways,
    • a specific byway's intrinsic qualities, and
    • related byway amenities.
  3. Products (including printed items or other media) produced with National Scenic Byways Program funds may be offered for sale under certain circumstances. See the Other Considerations section labeled "Income Earned Under the National Scenic Byways Program" for additional information on the circumstances when sale income can be generated.

  4. Private property purchased or used for a byways funded project must be acquired consistent with the requirements of Uniform Relocation Assistance and Real Property Acquisition Policies Act of 1970 as amended. Federal rules for the Uniform Act are reprinted annually in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 29, Part 24. For additional information, see http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/realestate/realprop/index.html. Applicants should contact the FHWA division office byway contact or the State byways coordinator; see http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/scenic_byways//contacts/states.cfm.

  5. The proposed amount of byway funds should be proportionate to the proposed interpretive project's benefits to byway travelers. FHWA expects an applicant advancing a project benefiting the general public to propose a larger share of non-byways funds.

Practices

  1. An interpretive plan is a document identifying the intrinsic qualities that form the byway's story; strategies for informing byway travelers about the significance of the intrinsic qualities; and initiatives planned, underway or in place along the byway for providing tourist and interpretive information.

  2. Tourist and interpretive information includes, but is not limited to, signs, brochures, pamphlets, maps, video tapes, audio tapes, CD's, podcasts, a byway website, interpretive exhibits and kiosks. It includes coordination of volunteers for living history demonstrations, docents or step-on guide programs, and training for individuals to inform the byway traveler of the significance of the byway's intrinsic qualities that form the byway's story.

  3. The information should reflect the entire byway and inform the traveler of the significance of the intrinsic qualities that form the byway's story.

  4. Interpretive information or products may include information on commercial establishments to the extent such establishments are directly related to the byway or its intrinsic qualities as identified in conjunction with the byway's designation or the corridor management plan.

  5. Sponsors or advertising may be included in information developed or printed with byway funds; however any revenue derived directly or indirectly from such sponsorships or advertising must be used for activities eligible under the National Scenic Byways Program, 23 U.S.C. 162(c), http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/scenic_byways/us_code.cfm.

  6. Byway funds may be used for the initial printing of up to a one year supply of printed materials and other media, intended for free distribution, but not for additional reprints.

  7. Byway funds may be used to revise and update interpretive information (e.g. byway's themes and stories) to aid the byway travelers' interpretive understanding. Applicants are encouraged to highlight how the current request will build upon activities already funded or underway.

  8. Eligible expenses associated with the distribution of promotional materials and media packets are limited to shipping costs for mass mailings. Costs associated with the fulfillment of individual information requests are not eligible for NSBP funding.

  9. All completed products should acknowledge the funding sources used to accomplish the work. See http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/scenic_byways/logo/ and click on the America's Byways Graphic Standards Manual for attribution guidelines, and, where appropriate, the use of the America's Byways® logo.

  10. A website must provide a link to the America's Byways® website, as appropriate. Websites developed using Federal funding should meet accessibility requirements under Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, 29 U.S.C. § 794 (d). See http://www.access-board.gov/guidelines-and-standards/communications-and-it/about-the-section-508-standards/.

  11. When considering how best to organize an eligible project proposal in the Interpretive Information category, FHWA expects the applicant to consider and respond to the following questions:

    • What would be accomplished with this proposed project? Will specific projects and priorities be identified in the development of the Interpretive Plan? If an Interpretive Plan is already in place, how does this project specifically relate to the activities and priorities identified in the Plan?
    • What are the byway's intrinsic qualities that support the byway's designation and that would be interpreted as part of this proposed interpretive project? How would information be developed and provided through this proposed interpretive project to inform byway travelers about the significance of the byway's story and intrinsic qualities?
    • Are directional signs currently along the byway? Would directional signs be placed along the byway as part of this proposed interpretive project? Who will pay for the signs? Will the road management authority agree to the location(s) for directional signing?
    • Is directional information available to byway travelers in byway maps, publications, exhibits or other mediums? Would directional information be developed and provided as part of this proposed interpretive project?
    • Who is currently developing or providing interpretive information along the byway? From the byway traveler's perspective, are the byway stories coordinated? How would the interpretive information help create a continuous experience for the visitor with minimum intrusions or gaps? How would the information be developed and provided through this proposed interpretive project to help achieve these objectives?
    • What related projects have been completed or are planned or underway along the byway? How would the information be developed and provided under this proposed interpretive project to complement these other efforts?
    • Is the proposed amount of byway funds proportionate to the proposed project's benefits to byway travelers? To what extent would the interpretive information emphasize the overall byway or the immediate surrounding area, forest, or park? How would the interpretive information be integrated or coordinated with the byway stories or experience?
    • Does the corridor management plan include this project, and how does it compare to other priority projects along the byway?
    • Why did byway leaders make this project a high priority and who participated in setting the byway's project priorities?
    • Are agreements in place to sustain the information that would be developed and provided under this proposed interpretive project? For example, who will pay for reprints of publications, or who will pay to maintain interpretive exhibits or directional signs?

Complete Applications Include:

Below are some tips to the applicant when preparing a complete application for a project in the Interpretive Information category.

  1. INTERPRETIVE INFORMATION: Reviewers can determine eligibility only when the application demonstrates there is a clear relationship between the proposed project and the byway traveler experience. Respond to the questions posed in item eleven of the Practices section (above) - in the Narrative Section of the application.

  2. MAPS: Provide a map that locates the individual byway within the State or on Indian lands including the beginning and end points of the byway. If signs, exhibits or kiosks would be developed or installed as part of this proposed interpretive project, then a map should also identify the single location or multiple locations of these signs or structures. A map should also identify the relationship of these signs or structures and similar existing or planned signs or structures along the byway. (If possible, please include the addresses/intersections and GPS coordinates for the beginning and end points of the byway and proposed installations such that the sites can be located using basic mapping software).

  3. PLANS AND OTHER SUPPORTING DOCUMENTS: If signs, exhibits or kiosks would be developed or installed as part of this proposed interpretive project, provide available plans showing the proposed work. Depending on the stage of project design, plans ranging from general concept plans to construction plans that show what is being proposed will be satisfactory. Include concepts for kiosk structures, sign panel placement schemes, mockups of brochures or other available information that helps reviewers understand the scope of the proposed interpretive project. Use the Attachments Section of the application to include any documents.

Updated: 09/19/2014
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