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Multi-State, Multi-Tribe, and Coordinated Grants

States may submit multi-state byway applications and Indian tribes may submit multi-tribe byway applications for funding. The decision to submit a multi-state grant, multi-tribe or a coordinated grant request should be driven by the nature of the project activity and the administrative convenience of the grant recipient.

For purposes of the grant administration, a multi-state or multi-tribe grant is an arrangement whereby one State or Indian tribe agrees to serve as the lead-State or lead Indian tribe for preparing and submitting a single grant application, as well as administering the grant. The lead-State or lead Indian tribe determines the priority for the multi-state or multi-tribe grant.

A coordinated grant is an arrangement whereby more than one State or Indian tribe receives separate grants for related activities that they intend to coordinate closely during the implementation. Each State or Indian tribe submits a separate application. All applicants should indicate in the Narrative Section of the electronic application whether all of the applications must be funded to make the overall project work, or whether each application can be funded independently of the others. Each State or Indian tribe sets the priority for its coordinated grant application.

Potential Projects for Multi-State and Multi-Tribe Coordinated Grants

This information will be most useful for projects on a byway with designated segments in more than one State or Indian land, or nationally designated byways in the same region or market niche. Two options are available to coordinate work. An array of projects may lend themselves to coordinated development and implementation, such as resource assessment, marketing plans, marketing (e.g., coordinated branding), and, interpretive and wayfinding signing.

Administrative Options

If, for example, a group of byways and States or Indian tribes are planning to undertake an initiative for which they intend to advertise a single request for proposals, then they may decide to use the multi-state or multi-tribe option whereby the lead State or lead Indian tribe would advertise and contract for the work. The grant (or contract) could include travel expenses for a steering group of the participating States, Indian tribes, and/or byways to meet periodically with the consultant and provide direction for the effort.

Alternately, if the byways intend to advertise separate requests for proposals (for each byway, State, or Indian tribe), then they may decide to use the coordinated grant option - which could include travel expenses for a steering or coordinating group to meet periodically to coordinate efforts, avoid duplication, and develop complementary products.

FHWA will use the following principles and practices for the administration of multi-state and multi-tribe grant or coordinated grants.

Principles

  1. For purposes of the grant administration, a multi-state or multi-tribe grant is an arrangement whereby one State or Indian tribe agrees to serve as the lead State or lead Indian tribe for preparing and submitting the grant application, as well as administering the grant.

  2. A coordinated grant is an arrangement whereby more than one State or Indian tribe receives separate grants for related activities which they intend to coordinate closely during the implementation. Each State or Indian tribe submits a separate application.

  3. The decision to submit a multi-state or multi-tribe grant or a coordinated grant request should be driven by the nature of the project activity and the administrative convenience of the grant recipient(s).

Practices

  1. States, Indian tribes, and/or byway organizations should decide how to approach a particular project from both a technical and administrative standpoint, (e.g., the scope of the initiative, the skills and expertise of the participants, the authority of the entities to enter multi-party agreements -- across State or Tribal boundaries -- and the ease of using funds for out-of-State travel, for staff from other States, Indian tribes or byways to travel, or any similar considerations affecting the travel of Indian tribe representatives).

    Note: To the extent that any of these or other considerations significantly influence the approach agreed upon by the participating States, Indian tribes, and/or byway organizations, these factors should be noted in the grant proposal(s).

  2. FHWA will assume the State or Tribal government submitting the application for a multi-state or multi-tribe grant proposal is the lead State or lead Indian tribe for both the technical and administrative aspects of the grant.

    Note: If a different State, Indian tribe, or byway organization has lead responsibility for the technical aspects of the grant, it should be noted in the grant proposal. The grant agreement will be between FHWA and the lead administrative State or between FHWA and the lead administrative Indian tribe. FHWA will allocate all of the funds to the lead State or lead Indian tribe.

  3. The grant proposals for coordinated grants should include brief information on the coordination and planning that occurred in the development of the applications.

    Note: Each State or Indian tribe submits a separate application. All applicants should indicate in the Narrative Section of the electronic application whether all of the applications must be funded to make the overall project work, or whether each application can be funded independently of the others.

  4. If a steering or coordinating group will oversee the effort, the grant proposal(s) should list the contact information for each member of the steering committee. If travel and per diem expenses are included in the proposal, it should include the number of times the steering committee plans to meet and the relationship of each meeting to major milestones in the proposed work plan for the effort. Only costs directly associated with the NSBP project award will be reimbursed. Otherwise, the proposal should indicate that any travel and per diem expenses would be covered from funding sources other than the National Scenic Byways Program.

Updated: 09/03/2013
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