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Arrow Innovations - Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies

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CA4PRS tool helps determine cost-effective project strategies

CA4PRS-a computerized method for comparing multiple what if scenarios-is user-friendly and easy to learn and allows planners and designers to evaluate interrelated combinations of factors that would be difficult to assess manually.

One of the biggest challenges agencies face during a highway project's planning and design stages is determining how best to balance construction schedules, traffic inconvenience, and cost objectives. Construction Analysis for Pavement Rehabilitation Strategies (CA4PRS) is a scheduling and traffic analysis tool that helps planners and designers select cost-effective rehabilitation strategies.

CA4PRS—a computerized method for comparing multiple "what-if" scenarios—is user-friendly and easy to learn and allows planners and designers to evaluate interrelated combinations of factors that would be difficult to assess manually. Its greatest value is in providing information on how to balance pavement design, construction constraints, traffic operations and highway agency budget during the planning and design stage of rehabilitation projects.

  • Estimating working days and construction project management (CPM) schedules
  • Developing construction staging plans
  • Supplementing traffic management plans
  • Outlining incentives and cost-plus-schedule (A +B) contracts

The software's scheduling module estimates highway project duration (total number of closures) under alternative pavement design, lane–closure, and contractor logistics scenarios. CA4PRS's traffic module (using the Highway Capacity Manual demand capacity model) quantifies the impact of construction work zone closures on the traveling public in road user cost and time spent in queue.

CA4PRS is stand–alone software, so users need to install only the program itself to use it. The software runs on Microsoft Windows 95/NT4.0/98/2000/XP or higher operating systems and on computer systems with reasonably up–to–date hardware components. CA4PRS employs a multiple–document interface—similar to Microsoft's Excel and Word programs—that enables users to open, view, and compare multiple projects and analyses simultaneously.

Since 1999, CA4PRS capabilities and benefits have been demonstrated on major highway rehabilitation projects in California, Minnesota, and Washington. For example, CA4PRS was used with traffic simulation models to select the most economical rehabilitation scenario for the Interstate 15 Devore Project in San Bernardino, CA. The 4.5–kilometer concrete reconstruction project would have taken 10 months using traditional nighttime closures, but was completed over two 9–day periods using one–roadbed continuous closures and around–the–clock construction. Implementing continuous closures rather than repeated nighttime closures in this project saved $6 million in highway agency costs and $2 million in road user costs (see table below).

Construction Alternative Schedule Comparison Cost Comparison ($M) Max Delay (Min.)
  Total Closure Closure Hours User Delays Agency Cost Total Cost  
Continous (24/7) Closure 2 400 5.0 15.0 20.0 80
72–Hour Weekday Closure 8 512 5.0 16.0 21.0 50
55–Hour Weekend Closure 14 770 14.0 17.0 31.0 80
10–Hour Nighttime Closure 220 2,200 7.0 21.0 28.0 30.0

For More Information

http://www.dot.ca.gov/newtech/roadway/ca4prs/index.htm

Contact

Ken Jacoby
Pavement Engineer
Office of Asset Management
FHWA
202–366–6503
ken.jacoby@dot.gov
Kim Willoughby
Washington State DOT
360–705–7978
wilouk@wsdot.gov
Michael Samadian
California DOT
916–324–2048
michael_m_samadian@dot.ca.gov

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Contact

Bryan Cawley
Office of Asset Management, Pavements, and Construction
202-366-1333
bryan.cawley@dot.gov

Updated: 04/04/2011
 

FHWA
United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration