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FHWA Order M1100.1A, Chg. 52

Order
Subject
FHWA Delegations and Organization Manual: Introduction
Classification Code Date  
M1100.1A May 7, 2007

PART II (ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS)

Introduction

Table of Contents

Par.

  1. What is the scope of this Manual?
    1. Part I - Delegations of Authority
    2. Part II - Organization and Functions
  2. Who is the issuing authority for this Manual?
  3. What are the functions and responsibilities of the Office of the Administrator?
  4. What offices and key positions comprise the Office of the Administrator?
  5. What organizational elements comprise the FHWA and what functions do they perform?
    1. Headquarters
    2. Field
      1. (1) Resource Center
      2. (2) Federal-aid Division Offices
      3. (3) Federal Lands Highway Divisions
  6. What are the origin and history of the FHWA?

FHWA ORDER M 1100.1A

FHWA DELEGATIONS AND ORGANIZATION MANUAL
PART II (ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS

Introduction

  1. What is the scope of this Manual? The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Delegations and Organization Manual documents the official, approved delegations of authority vested in the FHWA by law, regulation, or delegation from the Secretary of Transportation, and the organizational responsibilities and functional statements for all formal organizational elements. The Manual is summarized below:

    1. Part I - Delegations of Authority - documents the order of succession to certain official FHWA positions, reservations of authority, and the delegations of authority from the Administrator to certain Headquarters and field office officials. Authorities are classified generally according to program, e.g., Administrative, Federal-aid, Federal Lands, Highway Safety, and International Highway Programs.

    2. Part II - Organization and Functions - documents the approved formal organizational elements of the FHWA and the corresponding complete functional statements for the elements.

  2. Who is the issuing authority for this Manual? The FHWA Delegations and Organization Manual is issued electronically by the Associate Administrator for Administration, after completion of coordination, as required, and final approval by the approving official. The authorities and procedures relative to the preparation and issuance of changes to this Manual are contained in Chapter 1, General, of each of the respective parts of this Manual.

  3. What are the functions and responsibilities of the Office of the Administrator? The Administrator, assisted by the Deputy Administrator and Executive Director provides executive direction and leadership over the various FHWA Headquarters and field organizations. The Administrator is directly accountable to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary of Transportation for accomplishing the Agency's mission and supporting the Secretary's goals and objectives.

  4. What offices and key positions comprise the Office of the Administrator? Office of the Administrator includes the Federal Highway Administrator, the Deputy Administrator, the Executive Director, and their staffs. Some of the other key offices and positions within the Office of the Administrator are as follows:

    1. The Directors of Field Services, who are a part of the Executive Director's office, provide administrative supervision and leadership on strategic initiatives to their constituent FHWA Federal-aid division offices. The Director of Field Services – West provides administrative supervision and leadership on strategic initiatives to the FHWA Resource Center. The Director of Field Services – North is the U.S. DOT Regional Emergency Transportation Coordinator (RETCO) for DOT Region V and in that capacity supports DOT crisis planning, training, and response programs.

    2. The Program Manager for Transportation Security, who is a part of the Executive Director's office, is the Administrator's representative and virtual team leader for FHWA Headquarters staff in identifying and addressing transportation infrastructure vulnerability and other critical transportation system security issues, and collaborates fully with the field staff.

    3. The Program Manager for Public-Private Partnerships, who is part of the Executive Director's office, is the Administrator's representative and virtual team leader for FHWA Headquarters and field staff in implementing and managing initiatives to promote and facilitate the use of public-private partnerships on transportation projects.

    4. The Executive Secretariat, which is part of the Executive Director's office, provides guidance to Agency offices on correspondence matters and serves as the central clearing point for written communications, documents, and action assignments directed to, or issued by, the Office of the Administrator. This office plans and administers a system for expediting, controlling, and coordinating written communications and action assignments to and from the Administrator, the Deputy Administrator, and the Executive Director.

    5. The Program Manager for the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office (JPO) provides executive direction over the ITS JPO which has a Department wide role and authority for coordinating ITS program activities and initiatives. The Administrator of the Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) has primary responsibility for the strategic oversight and direction of the ITS JPO, including but not limited to providing policy guidance for ITS programs and activities and coordinating ITS research within the Department. The FHWA Administrator is responsible for ensuring the continuing availability of professional, technical, and administrative services within, or subject to the direction of, the FHWA to support the ITS JPO.

  5. What organizational elements comprise the FHWA and what functions do they perform?

    1. Headquarters. Headquarters provides policy and overall program direction to the Agency. The Headquarters organization is comprised of the Office of the Chief Counsel, Office of the Chief Financial Officer, and 11 Associate Administrator offices: Planning, Environment, and Realty; Infrastructure; Operations; Safety; Federal Lands Highway; Policy and Governmental Affairs; Public Affairs; Civil Rights; Professional and Corporate Development; Research, Development, and Technology; and Administration. The Offices of Planning, Environment, and Realty; Infrastructure; Operations; Safety; and Federal Lands Highway are the corporate nucleus for strategic planning, policy, and technology delivery. The Offices of Policy and Governmental Affairs; Chief Counsel; Public Affairs; Civil Rights; Professional and Corporate Development; Research, Development, and Technology Administration; and Chief Financial Officer provide service and support across the Agency. Integrated Product Teams, formally chartered by the Agency leadership, will also be utilized to focus on specific high priority projects for partners and customers.

    2. Field. The field organization delivers program services to the FHWA's partners and customers. This organization consists of a Resource Center, State-level Federal-aid division offices, and Federal Lands Highway divisions.

      1. Resource Center. The FHWA Resource Center supports the State-level Federal-aid division offices throughout the country, in the division offices' primary role of program delivery to FHWA's partners and customers. Services provided to the Federal-aid division offices include: leadership on strategic initiatives; expert assistance on technical, process, and program issues; training; and technology transfer. The Resource Center does not exercise program control or approval. With regard to the Headquarters offices, the Resource Center supports them regarding technology and innovation deployment, Agency initiatives, and policy development.

        The FHWA Resource Center has offices in five locations: Atlanta, Georgia; Baltimore, Maryland; Lakewood, Colorado; Olympia Fields, Illinois; and San Francisco, California. The Resource Center has 12 virtual Technical Service Teams (TST). While each Resource Center location has two to three TST's assigned, a presence of each discipline is maintained at each of the locations. The names of the TST's are as follows:

        1. Safety and Highway Design TST
        2. Operations TST
        3. Pavements and Materials TST
        4. Construction and Project Management TST
        5. Structures TST
        6. Geotechnical and Hydraulics TST
        7. Environment TST
        8. Planning TST
        9. Air Quality TST
        10. Civil Rights TST
        11. Finance Services TST
        12. Innovative Finance TST

        In addition to the TSTs, the Resource Center has the following teams that provide support to the Agency and/or the Resource Center: Information and Management Team, Marketing and Communication Team, and Administration Team.

      2. Federal-aid Division Offices. Federal-aid division offices, each headed by a Division Administrator, provide front line Federal-aid program delivery and assistance to partners and customers in highway transportation and safety services, including but not limited to, planning and research, preliminary engineering services, technology transfer, real property acquisition and management, bridge expertise, highway safety, traffic operations, environmental support, design, construction, asset management, and civil rights. The FHWA operates, jointly with the Federal Transit Administration, four metropolitan offices which are extensions of the respective division offices. These offices provide assistance, guidance, and information regarding Federal transportation programs to local, State, and other Federal agencies in these metropolitan areas.

      3. Federal Lands Highway Divisions. The Federal Lands Highway (FLH) divisions, which report to the Headquarters Office of Federal Lands Highway, administer FLH programs (Forest Highways, Park Roads, and Parkways, Public Lands, Refuge Roads, and Indian Reservation Roads); the Defense Access Roads Program; and the Emergency Relief Program on Federally Owned Roads; provide engineering-related services to other Federal agencies, FHWA offices, and foreign countries as directed; and carry out technology and training activities related to FLH projects. There are three FLH divisions (Eastern, Central, and Western) located in Sterling, Virginia; Lakewood, Colorado; and Vancouver, Washington; respectively. The Division Engineer for the Federal Lands Highway Central Division is appointed as the Regional Emergency Transportation Coordinator for Region VII.

  6. What are the origin and history of the FHWA? The FHWA was established as a segment of the DOT on April 1, 1967. Representing the Federal interest in the Nation's highway transportation system, the Agency was comprised of entities transferred from the Bureau of Public Roads and the National Highway Safety Bureau within the Department of Commerce and the Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety within the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC).

    The Bureau of Public Roads began as the Office of Road Inquiry under the authority of the Agricultural Appropriation Act of 1894 and underwent various name changes and program expansions prior to becoming part of the FHWA; the Bureau of Motor Carrier Safety was established pursuant to provisions of the Motor Carrier Act of August 9, 1935, subsequently cited as Part II of the Interstate Commerce Act; and the National Highway Safety Bureau was a composite of two separate agencies established pursuant to the Highway Safety Act of 1966 and the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966.

    On March 22, 1970, the National Highway Safety Bureau was taken out of the FHWA and established as the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) within DOT. At the time of this division, FHWA retained responsibility for administering those provisions of the Highway Safety Act of 1966 pertaining to highway-oriented aspects of highway safety, maintaining close coordination with NHTSA in carrying out these assigned responsibilities.

    The FHWA assumed additional commercial interstate truck and bus regulatory functions as a result of the ICC Termination Act of 1995 (ICCTA).

    On October 16, 1998, the FHWA restructured its field organization, abolishing its nine regions and regional offices – most program authorities had previously been delegated to the Federal-aid division offices. In addition, four resource centers were established as central locations for technical and program specialists, with responsibility for assisting the division offices and other customers and partners, as needed.

    The FHWA's Headquarters restructured into a matrix-like organization on February 2, 1999, consisting of five core business units (CBUs) (i.e., Planning and Environment, Infrastructure, Operations, Motor Carrier and Highway Safety, and Federal Lands Highway), and eight service business units (SBUs) (i.e., Policy; Chief Counsel; Public Affairs; Civil Rights; Corporate Management; Research, Development, and Technology; Professional Development; and Administration). The Operations CBU included the Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office (ITS JPO), which has a department wide role that is overseen by the Deputy Secretary of Transportation and the ITS Management Council.

    The FY 2000 Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, signed by former President Clinton on October 9, 1999, contained language prohibiting the use of the funds appropriated or limited in the Act to carry out the functions and operations of the "Office of Motor Carriers" within the FHWA. This effectively resulted in the transfer of motor carrier functions and operations out of the FHWA, including the interstate truck and bus regulatory functions previously assumed under ICCTA. By action of former Secretary Rodney Slater, motor carrier functions and operations were transferred out of the FHWA effective October 9, 1999. On December 9, 1999, former President Clinton signed the Motor Carrier Safety Improvement Act of 1999, which established a new administration, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, within the DOT effective January 1, 2000. The transfer of motor carrier safety functions out of the FHWA effectively resulted in the organizational abolishment of the FHWA's Motor Carrier and Highway Safety CBU.

    Because safety remained a main emphasis in FHWA programs and policies, the FHWA determined that there was a need for a Safety CBU. On February 22, 2000, a Safety CBU was established within FHWA, and the Motor Carrier and Highway Safety CBU was formally abolished.

    The Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Joint Program Office (JPO), a multi-modal organizational element located within the FHWA, was also established on January 18, 2001. The TIFIA JPO administers the Federal credit program authorized by the Act in cooperation with the Office of the Secretary, the Federal Transit Administration, and the Federal Railroad Administration. The office has a department wide role which is overseen by the Assistant Secretary for Budget and Programs and the TIFIA Credit Council (formerly known as the TIFIA Steering Committee).

    In May 2002, FHWA's five CBU's and eight SBU's were retitled as "Offices," i.e., the Office of Planning and Environment; Office of Infrastructure; Office of Operations; Office of Safety; Office of Federal Lands Highway; Office of Policy; Office of Chief Counsel; Office of Public Affairs; Office of Civil Rights; Office of Corporate Management; Office of Research, Development, and Technology; Office of Professional Development; and the Office of Administration. The Office of Planning and Environment was subsequently reorganized and retitled as the Office of Planning, Environment, and Realty, in September 2002.

    On May 4, 2003, the resource centers began functioning as a single Resource Center operating out of several locations and utilizing multiple virtual Technical Service Teams (TST) to accomplish their mission.

    On November 14, 2003, the ITS JPO was moved to FHWA's Office of the Administrator, advising and reporting to both the Deputy Secretary of Transportation and the FHWA Administrator, and providing advice to the ITS Management Council.

    In October 2004, the Office of Corporate Management and the Office of Professional Development were consolidated as the Office of Professional and Corporate Development.

    On October 24, 2005, the FHWA formally established the Office of the Chief Financial Officer as an Associate Administrator level office headed by the Agency's Chief Financial Officer who reports directly to the Administrator.

    In November 2006, the FHWA Administrator and the Acting Administrator, Research and Innovative Technology Administration (RITA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding which gave the RITA Administrator primary responsibility for the strategic oversight and direction of the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Joint Program Office (JPO). Organizationally, the ITS JPO remains within the FHWA and reports to the FHWA Administrator who is responsible for ensuring the continuing availability of professional, technical, and administrative services within, or subject to the direction of, the FHWA to support the ITS JPO.
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