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FHWA Order M3000.1C

Order
Subject
FHWA Personnel Management Manual; Part 1: Personnel Systems & Procedures, Chapter 10: Retirement, Insurance, Income Protection, and Other Employee Services, Section 8: Wellness Programs
Classification Code Date
M3000.1C November 4, 2005  

Par.

  1. What is the purpose of this section?
  2. Does this directive cancel an existing FHWA directive?
  3. What references were used when writing this section?
  4. What is the FHWA policy on health and fitness services?
  5. What do the FHWA health and fitness programs include, and how are they made available?
  6. Who has responsibility for these service programs?
  7. How can offices obtain these services for their employees?
  8. Who is eligible to participate?
  9. How are absences for participation in health programs handled?

 

  1. What is the purpose of this section? The purpose of this section is to provide procedures for the administration of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) preventive health services and fitness efforts under the FHWA Worklife Wellness Program.

  2. Does this directive cancel an existing FHWA directive? No. This is a new section that has been added to the Personnel Management Manual (PMM).

  3. What references were used when writing this section?

    1. Occupational Health and Safety Act of 1970.

    2. Public Law 79-658, Title 5, United States Code (U.S.C.), Section 7901.

    3. Title 41, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 101-17, Temporary Regulation D-76.

    4. Executive Order 12345, dated February 2, 1982.

    5. Comptroller General Decision B-240371.

  4. What is the FHWA policy on health and fitness services? The FHWA regards its employees as it's most important asset. The FHWA supports and encourages physical fitness and other preventative health programs, as well as programs dealing with disease prevention. These are all essential elements of an effective Worklife Wellness Program. The positive impact of good health on maintaining effective performance and productivity has been well established and is endorsed by the FHWA. Providing the means to help employees ensure their health and fitness is therefore a very necessary and integral part of the FHWA Human Resources Management Program.

  5. What do the FHWA health and fitness programs include, and how are they made available?

    1. These services consist of:

      1. Emergency treatment of illness or injury on the job.

      2. Specific disease screening (blood pressure monitoring and cholesterol screening).

      3. Follow-up treatments, as feasible, under the direction of a private physician.

      4. Health education.

      5. Stress management education.

      6. Periodic physical examinations for full-time employees age 40 and over.

      7. Periodic health screenings for employees under age 40.

      8. Immunizations.

      9. Environmental health hazards appraisals.

      10. Physical fitness programs and facilities.

      11. Health services and intervention programs.

    2. Washington Headquarters employees can obtain these services through the Civilian Health Unit and the Employee Fitness Center.

    3. Availability of these services for field employees is contingent upon local arrangements.

  6. Who has responsibility for these service programs?

    1. The Director of the Office of Human Resources is responsible for developing FHWA's policy and service programs for Washington Headquarters employees.

    2. The Resource Center Director, Federal-aid Division Administrators, and Federal Lands Division Engineers are responsible for the establishment and review of health services programs in their respective organizations. To the extent practical, offices are encouraged to partner with other Federal agencies to provide these services to employees.

    3. Managers are encouraged to consider FHWA mission responsibilities and financial resources when developing individual programs.

  7. How can offices obtain these services for their employees?

    1. Offices can explore various methods for obtaining health services for employees who work in groups of 300 or more, which may include employees of all Departments or Agencies who are scheduled to be on duty at one time in the same locality. In this situation, a health services program may be established within the following framework:

      1. If FHWA staff or facilities are not adequate to provide needed services, management may consider entering into an agreement to use existing facilities of another Federal government agency.

      2. If neither FHWA nor another Agency has adequate facilities available, management may consider:

        1. jointly establishing a professional health unit and/or fitness facility to service the FHWA and the other participating Agencies, or

        2. entering into an agreement with qualified private or public organizations for professional services.

    2. Health services may be provided for employees who work in groups of less than 300 if it is determined that such services are in the Federal government’s best interest and a reasonable basis for that determination is recorded.

    3. Methods for providing these services include arrangements with local hospitals, private and public health clinics, private physicians, multiphase screening programs, and voluntary health organizations. Field offices desiring to implement a health program in field operating divisions under their jurisdiction should contact the Worklife Wellness representative in their servicing human resources office. Field offices are reminded that the purchase of fitness club memberships for the use of employees on a continuing basis should be undertaken only where all other resources have been considered and rejected, and where employee use of the program will be carefully monitored as part of a bona fide preventive program related to health.

    4. Attachment 1 provides a discussion of activities and services that are appropriate for payment under the FHWA Worklife Wellness Program. The list is not meant to be all inclusive. Employees should consult with the appropriate Worklife Wellness Coordinator concerning other activities that may be acceptable for payment.

  8. Who is eligible to participate? All FHWA employees are eligible to participate in the FHWA sponsored health and fitness programs with the permission of their physicians. Employees with Flexible Spending Accounts must consider the tax implications of using Federal funds for health and fitness activities as opposed to funds set aside in this pre-tax program.

  9. How are absences for participation in health programs handled?

    1. Employees may be excused from duty for the length of time necessary to participate in Agency-sponsored preventative medical programs (e.g., physical examinations or screenings, immunizations, and health education programs).

    2. Employees interested in participating in lunchtime exercise programs should consult with their supervisors to arrange their working hours to accommodate the extra time needed for exercise.

Attachment 1

Acceptable Wellness Activities

Activities not acceptable under the Wellness Program

Wellness activities must be designed to enhance the Agency's mission. For example, bottled water for the office is a personal preference. Washington Headquarters’ offices that use bottled water normally request that their employees pay a monthly fee for this service. In addition, organized sports registration may enhance office morale, but this, too, is a personal preference.

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