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FHWA Order M 7560.3 Chg.1

Order
Subject
HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT GUIDE
Classification Code Date
M7560.3 Chg.1 September 21, 1979  

[please refer to hard copy of document for organizational charts]

  1. PURPOSE. To cancel Volume 2, Chapter II, National Emphasis Program (NEP), of the Highway Safety Program Management Guide dated February 18, 1976.

  2. COMMENTS

    1. In 1972, the NEP was instituted to establish desirable national goals in connection with the highway-related Safety Program Standards. Since that time, the States have improved their capability for identifying problem areas and developing corrective measures for highway safety. In addition, many of the individual NEP goals are now provided for in other ways such as special emphasis areas issued annually by the Federal Highway Administrator, individual FHWA directives, and the highway-related safety program standards and manuals.

    2. In order to avoid duplication or conflict between these issuances, Volume 2, Chapter II of the Highway Safety Program Management Guide is hereby rescinded.

/s/

Robert A. Kaye
Acting Associate Administrator
for Safety

FILING INSTRUCTIONS

Remove / Insert

 
 
Pages i and ii dated         Pages i and ii
2/18/76
 
Pages 2-II-1 and 2-II-2
2/18/76
 
 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

M 7560.3 Chg.1
September 21, 1979

VOLUME 1 - AUTHORITY AND ORGANIZATION

Chapter I. Introduction to Highway Safety Program Management

Paragraph 1. Background and Authority

Appendix A. Highway Safety Program References

Chapter II Organization

Paragraph:

  1. Headquarters FHWA and NHTSA

  2. Regions

  3. Divisions

Appendix A. Organizations Charts

Chapter III. Functions and Responsibilities

Paragraph:

  1. Introduction

  2. Office of Highway Safety

  3. FHWA Regions

  4. FHWA Divisions

VOLUME 2 - FHWA SAFETY PROGRAM GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM

Chapter I. Goals and Objectives

Paragraph:

  1. Goals

  2. Objectives

Chapter II Reserved

HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM MANAGEMENT GUIDE

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976

Par.

  1. Purpose

  2. Existing Issuances Affected

  3. Scope

  4. Background

  5. Comments

  6. Filing Instructions

  1. PURPOSE. This order transmits the revised Highway Safety Program Management Guide.

  2. EXISTING ISSUANCES AFFECTED. The Highway Safety Program Management Guide Issued on February 14, 1972 and all changes through Transmittal 6 are superseded.

  3. SCOPE. The provisions of this order are applicable to all elements of the Federal Highway Administration responsible for administering FHWA safety programs.

  4. BACKGROUND. The Highway Safety Program Management Guide originally issued on February 14, 1972, is revised and reissued in accordance with the FHWA Directives System.

  5. COMMENTS. Minor editorial changes have been made to improve or correct the current text. Several changes have been made to reflect programs initiated by the Highway Safety Act of 1973 and the Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974. Some revisions were required to remove all regulatory material from this Guide. Changes in FHWA and NHTSA organizations are reflected in this update. The National Emphasis Program has been rewritten in part to reflect the FHWA practice of stating Annual Program Emphasis areas. New topics, including(a) Rules of Procedure for invoking Sanctions under the Highway Safety Act of 1966, (b) Incentive Grants for Reduction of Highway Fatality Rates, and (c) Annual Report to Congress, have been added to the Guide.

  6. FILING INSTRUCTIONS

    1. This Order should be filed in front of the Highway Safety Program Management Guide.

    2. The front and back covers and the Foreward are to be replaced by those transmitted with this Order.

    3. The Chapters transmitted by this Order are to be filed as follows:

        Remove Insert

      i thru ii of the i thru iii of the Table

        Table of Contents of Contents

      dated 7/21/72

      1-1-1 and 1-1-2 1-1-1 thru 1-1-3 and

      dated 2/14/72 and 1-1-A-1 and 1-1-A-2

      1-1-A-1 and 1-1-A-2 of Vol. 1, Ch. 1 dated 7/21/72 of

        Vol. 1, Ch. I

      1-11-1 and 1-11-2 1-11-1 and 1-11-2 and

      and 1-11-A-1 thru 1-11-A-1 thru 1-11-A-4

      1-11-A-4 dated 2/14/72 of Vol. 1, Ch. II of Vol. 1, Ch. II

      1-111-1 thru 1-111-3 1-111-1 thru 1-111-3

      dated 5/8/72 of Vol. 1, of Vol. 1, Ch. III

        Ch. III

      2-1-1 dated 2/14/72 of 2-1-1 of Vol. 2,

        Vol. 2, Ch. I Ch. I

      2-11-1 and 2-11-2 dated 2-11-1 and 2-11-2 of

      2/14/72 of Vol. 2, Ch. II Vol. 2, Ch. II

      3-1-1 and 3-1-2 dated 3-1-1 and 3-1-2 of Vol. 3

      2/14/72 of Vol. 3, Ch I Ch. I

      3-11-1 and 3-11-2 dated 3-11-1 and 3-11-2 of

      2/14/72 of Vol. 3, Vol. 3, Ch. II

        Ch. II

      3-111-1 thru 3-111-6 3-111-1 thru 3-111-6 and 3-111-A-1 thru and 3-111-A-1 thru 3-111- 3-111-A-7 dated 2/14/72 A-7 of Vol. III, Ch. III of Vol. 3, Ch. III

      4-1-1 thru 4-1-6 dated 4-1-1 thru 4-1-6 of

      4-28-72 of Vol. 4, Vol. 4, Ch. 1

        Ch. I

        Remove Insert

      4-11-1 and 4-11-2 dated 4-11-1 and 4-11-2 of

      7/21/72 of Vol. 4, Vol. 4, Ch. II

        Ch. II

      4-111-1 thru 4-111-3 4-111-1 thru 4-111-5

      dated 7/21/72 of Vol. 4, of Vol. 4, Ch. III Ch. III

/s/
H. L. Anderson
Associate Administrator
for Safety

FHWA HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM STANDARDS

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT GUIDE

OFFICE OF HIGHWAY SAFETY

FOREWORD

This guide has been prepared by the Federal Administration (FHWA), Office of Highway Safety in an effort to provide direction to the safety program, and to assist the regional and division offices in administering the FHWA Highway Safety Standards.

The designation of the FHWA as the agency responsible for administering the highway related safety standards (three-plus Standards) provides the opportunity to significantly contribute to the safety of the motoring public.

Effective utilization of available funds will require dedication, leadership, and initiative in providing safer highways. The office of Highway Safety which is responsible for administering the three-plus Standards nationally, stands ready to assist in every way possible, but the success of this program will be determined in large part by the effort and interest provided by the regional and division offices.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

VOLUME 1 - AUTHORITY AND ORGANIZATION

Chapter I. Introduction to Highway Safety Program Management

Paragraph 1. Background and Authority

Appendix A. Highway Safety Program References

Chapter II. Organization

Paragraph:

  1. Headquarters FHWA and NHTSA

  2. Regions

  3. Divisions

Appendix A. Organization Charts

Chapter III. Functions and Responsibilities

Paragraph

  1. Introduction

  2. Office of Highway Safety

  3. FHWA Regions

  4. FHWA Divisions

VOLUME 2 - FHWA SAFETY PROGRAM GOALS, \OBJECTIVES AND NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM

Chapter I. Goals and Objectives

Paragraph:

  1. Goals

  2. Objectives

Chapter II: National Emphasis Program

Paragraph:

  1. Introduction

  2. Emphasis Program

    1. Accurate Identification of Accident Locations

    2. Traffic Engineering Capability

    3. Skid Accident Reduction Program

    4. Uniform Regulatory and Warning Signs

    5. Pedestrian Crossing Program

  3. Program Appraisal

VOLUME 3 - FUNDING ELIGIBILITY

Chapter I. General Eligibility Criteria

Paragraph

  1. Introduction

  2. Characteristics of Fundable Tasks and Subelements

  3. Ineligible Activities

Chapter II. Research, Development and Demonstration

Chapter III. Guidelines for Funding Specific Tasks

Paragraph:

  1. Field Reference Systems

  2. Training

  3. Highway Safety Needs Studies

  4. Warning and Regulatory Signs

  5. Skid Resistance Program

  6. Bridge Inspections

  7. Equipment Purchases

  8. Public Information

Appendix A. Typical Tasks

VOLUME 4 - HIGHWAY SAFETY COORDINATION

Chapter I. Coordination with Other FHWA Programs

Paragraph:

  1. Introduction

  2. Highway Safety Improvement Programs

  3. TOPICS

  4. Traffic Control Devices Improvement Program

  5. Highway Planning Program

  6. Motor Carrier Safety Program

  7. Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Safety Program

  8. Design and Operational Review Teams

Chapter II. Coordination with NHTSA

Paragraph:

  1. Introduction

  2. Washington Headquarters Coordination

  3. Regional Office Coordination

  4. FHWA Division Office Coordination

Chapter III. Shared Responsibilities

Paragraph:

  1. Introduction

  2. Fiscal Procedures

  3. Audits

  4. Civil Rights Assurances

  5. Environmental Impact Reviews

  6. OST Notification of AWP Authorization

  7. Coordination of Federal Assistance Programs

Chapter III. Shared Responsibilities

Paragraph

  1. Rules of Procedure for invoking Sanctions Under the Highway Safety Act of 1966

  2. Incentive grants for Reduction of Highway Fatality Rates

  3. Annual Report to Congress

1 - AUTHORITY AND ORGANIZATION

I - Introduction to Highway Safety Program Management

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976
(HHS-10)

Par. 1. Background and Authority

Appendix A. Highway Safety Program References

  1. BACKGROUND AND AUTHORITY

    1. The motor vehicle fatality rate reached a high of 16.8 fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles in 1934. With better roads, improved automobiles and more experienced drivers, the death rate was reduced to 5.2 by 1961. At this time, the death rate began to climb again and by 1965 had reached 5.5 deaths per 100 million vehicle miles. National concern regarding this increase in the fatality rate resulted in Congressional action.

    2. In 1965, Congress enacted the "Baldwin Amendment" providing that each state should have a highway safety program -- designed to reduce traffic accidents, deaths, injuries and property damage. This was the initial effort toward broad legislation dealing with highway safety.

    3. One year later, Congress repealed the Baldwin Amendment and enacted two Safety Acts -- the national Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-563) and the Highway Safety Act of 1966 (P.L. 89-564). The first Act provided for the establishment of the National Traffic Safety Agency and the second for the National Highway Safety Agency, both to be located in the Department of Commerce. These two agencies were later redesignated as Bureaus and assigned to the Department of Transportation (P. L. 89-670).

    4. In 1967, Executive Order 11357 combined the two safety bureaus into the National Highway Safety Bureau (NHSB). This Bureau was within the FHWA.

    5. Subsequent reorganization of the Department of Transportation resulted in the separation of the NHSB from FHWA.

    6. At the time of this separation, FHWA retained authority for the administration of the highway related safety Standards, frequently referred to as the "three-plus Standards." These include:

      Identification and Surveillance of Accident Locations; Highway Design, Construction and Maintenance; Traffic Engineering Services; and Highway Related Aspects of Pedestrian Safety.

    7. The Highway safety Act of 1970 established the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and assigned to it the responsibility to administer the safety program Standards pertaining to automobile and the driver.

    8. Since Fiscal year 1972, Congress has provided separate authorizations for the Highway Safety Standards administered by FHWA and by NHTSA.

    9. The Highway Safety Act of 1973 continued the provision of separate 23 U.S.C. 402(a) authorizations for NHTSA and FHWA. Section 231 of this Act amended 23 U.S.C. 402(a) to require safety standard(s) to improve bicycle safety. Section 228 of this Act amended 23 U.S.C. 402(b)(1) by adding subparagraph (F) to require curb ramps for the handicapped"...at all pedestrian crosswalks throughout the State.." constructed or replaced on or after July 1.1976.

    10. Other highway related safety programs initiated or continued in the 1973 Highway Safety Act are:
      
      Title 23  Section of          Title
      
      section    1973 Act
      
      203                      Rail-highway Crossings
      
      144            204       Bridge Reconstruction and Replacement151               205       Pavement
      
      marking Demonstration Program
      
      152            209       Projects for High-Hazard Locations
      
      153            210        Program for the Elimination of Roadside
      
                               Obstacles
      
      402(j)         219        Incentives for Compliance with Highway
      
                               Safety Programs
      
      405            230       Federal-Aid Safer Roads Demo Programs
      
      

    11. Section 114 of the Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974 added Section 154 to title 23 requiring a national maximum speed limit of 55 miles per hour. Section 121 of this Act modifies the 23 U.S.C. 405 Federal-Aid Safer Roads Demonstration Program by permitting Federal funding for the correction of high-hazard locations which were excluded from Federal assistance under the Highway Safety Act of 1973. Section 122 of the 1974 Amendments added new Section 219, Off-System Roads, to title 23.

    12. Section 219 has an apportionment formula based one-third on area, one-third on rural population and one-third on off-system (non Federal-aid, non-toll), rural, publicly maintained road mileage. These funds can be used for the construction, reconstruction and improvement of any off-system road, including bridge replacement, elimination of high-hazard locations and removal of roadside obstacles.

    13. Several Standards administered by NHTSA interact with the Standards for which the FHWA is responsible. These include: Traffic Records; Codes and Laws; Debris Hazard Control and Cleanup; Police Traffic Services; Pupil Transportation Safety; and Accident investigation and Reporting.

HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM REFERENCES

  1. Administration of Highway Safety Act of 1966 - Message from the President of the United States Transmitting the Second Annual Report on the Administration of the Highway Safety Act of 1966, U.S Government Printing Offices, Washington, D.C. (1969).

  2. Estimate of the Cost of Carrying Out the Provisions of the Highway Safety Act of 1966 - A report to congress from the Secretary of Transportation, U.S. Department of Transportation (October 1968).

  3. Highway Safety Program Standards - U.S. Department of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the Federal Highway Administration (February 1974).

  4. Highway Safety Program Standards - A Report from the Secretary of Transportation to the Congress as required by the Highway Safety Act of 1966, Committee Print No. 7, Committee on Public Works, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. (July 1967).

  5. Highway Safety Program Manual - U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Washington, D.C. Manual is comprised of Volumes:

      0. Planning and Administration

    1. Periodic Motor Vehicle Inspection

    2. Motor Vehicle Registration

    3. Motorcycle Safety

    4. Driver Education

    5. Driver Licensing

    6. Codes and Laws

    7. Traffic Courts

    8. Alcohol in Relation to Highway Safety

    9. Identification and Surveillance of Accident Locations

    10. Traffic Records

    11. Emergency Medical Services

    12. Highway Design, Construction, and Maintenance

    13. Traffic Engineering Services

    14. Pedestrian Safety

    15. Police Traffic Services

    16. Debris Hazard Control and Cleanup

    17. Pupil Transportation Safety

    18. Accident Investigation and Reporting

    1. Authorizations, Apportionments and Appropriations (not yet issued)

    2. Cost Reimbursement Principles (not yet issued)

    3. Comprehensive Plan

    4. Annual Highway Safety Work Program

    5. Program Administration (not yet issued)

    6. Program Information Reporting System (not yet issued)

  6. Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways - U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration (1971).

  7. Public Law 89-564, Highway Safety Act of 1966, U.S. Statutes at large, Volume 80, Stat. 731.

  8. Public Law 91-605, Highway Safety Act of 1970, U.S. Statutes at Large, Volume 84, Stat. 1739.

  9. Public Law 93-87, Highway Safety Act of 1973, U.S. Statutes at Large, Volume 87, Stat. 282.

  10. Public Law 93-643, Federal-Aid Highway Amendments of 1974, U.S. Statutes at Large, Volume 88, Stat. 2281.

  11. Report on Activities Under the Highway Safety Act, U.S. Department of Transportation, Washington, D.C. (Reports issued annually since 1968).

  12. The Federal Role in Highway Safety, 86th Congress, 1st Session, House Document 93, U.S. Government Printing Office (1959). (Out of print)

  13. U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Public Works, Highway Safety Act of 1966, Report to Accompany H.R. 13290, 89th Congress, 2nd Session, House Report No. 1700 (1966). (Out of print)

  14. U.S. Senate, Committee on Public Works, Highway Safety Act of 1966, Report to Accompany S. 3052, 89th Congress, 2nd Session, Senate Report No. 1302 (1966). (Out of print)

  15. U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Public Works, Highway Safety Act of 1970, Report to Accompany H.R. 19504, 91st Congress, 2nd Session, House Report No. 91-1554 (1970). (Out of print)

  16. U.S. House of Representatives, Committee on Public Works,Highway Safety Design and Operations (The Need for a Safer Driving Environment), Report of the Subcommittee on Investigations and Review, 93d Congress, 1st Session, House Report No. 93-7 (1973).

  17. U.S. Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, Program 20.600

1 - AUTHORITY AND ORGANIZATION

II - ORGANIZATION

Par.

  1. Headquarters FHWA and NHTSA

  2. Regions

  3. Divisions

Appendix A. Organization Charts

  1. HEADQUARTERS FHWA AND NHTSA

    1. At the Washington Headquarters level, the FHWA Associate Administrator for Safety and the NHTSA Associate Administrator for Traffic Safety Programs have been delegated authority for administering the highway-related and the driver-vehicle Highway Safety program Standards.

    2. Under the Associate Administrator for Safety, the Office of Highway Safety is responsible for administration of both the management and technical aspects of the highway-related Standards.

    3. Administration of the NHTSA driver-vehicle Standards is carried out through the Offices of State Program Assistance, Driver and Pedestrian Programs and State Vehicle Programs.

    4. Coordination in the joint development of management directives and procedural guides for the conduct of the State Highway Safety Program is achieved through cooperation of the FHWA Office of Highway Safety and NHTSA Office of State Program Assistance. These two offices also coordinate Annual Work Program and Comprehensive Plan reviews.

    5. The FHWA Office of highway Safety and the NHTSA Offices of Driver and Pedestrian Programs and State Vehicle Programs cooperate in technical and standards development activities.

  2. REGIONS

    1. Decentralized administration and coordination of the jointly managed highway safety program is achieved through the FHWA Regional Administrators and Division Administrators and the NHTSA Regional Administrators.

    2. Each Regional Federal Highway Administrator has designated his Office of Environment and Design to provide program policy guidance for the divisions with the region. He also has delegated program administration to the Division Administrator. The FHWA and NHTSA Regional Administrators or their designees work together in matters involving the coordination of the total program with the Governor's Representatives.

  3. DIVISIONS

    1. An FHWA Division Office is located in each State, usually in the capital city. Each Division Administrator has designated a representative to work with the Governor's Representative in administering the highway-related Standards.

    2. The organizational relationships between the Washington Headquarters and field offices of the two Administrations are shown in Appendix A of this Chapter.

1 - AUTHORITY AND ORGANIZATION

III - Functions and Responsibilities

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976
(HHS-10)

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Office of Highway Safety

  3. FHWA Regions

  4. FHWA divisions

  1. INTRODUCTION

    1. The Highway Safety Act of 1970 directed the Secretary to administer the highway-related aspects of the highway safety program through the Federal Highway Administration. The Federal Highway Administrator administers this program through the Office of Highway Safety under the Associate Administrator for safety.

    2. With the exception of the authority to (1) waive the 40 percent local participation requirement; (2) amend or waive standards on a temporary basis; and (3) initiate sanctions proceedings, the Federal Highway administrator has delegated authority to carry out the highway-related safety programs to the Regional Federal Highway Administrators with permission to redelegate.

  2. OFFICE OF HIGHWAY SAFETY

    1. The mission of the Office of Highway Safety is: "To provide planning, guidance, and leadership to a national highway safety program to reduce the frequency and severity of highway accidents by improving the driving environment of all streets and highways.

    2. The general functions of this office are carried out through two divisions as set forth below:

        (1) Program Management Division. This division in collaboration with NHTSA, is basically responsible for (a) integrating national highway safety goals and emphasis programs into State and community annual work programs and comprehensive plans; and (b) reviewing and evaluating overall effectiveness of the State highway safety programs.

        (2) Technical Development and Standards Division. This division is basically responsible for planning and developing Highway Safety Program Standards and coordinating State and community highway safety program application of those Standards directed towards the driving environment and road user relationships. Detailed functions for the Office of Highway Safety are set forth in FHWA Organization Manual, Part II, Chapter 11.

  3. FHWA REGIONS

    1. The Regional Federal Highway Administrator represents the Federal Highway Administrator in carrying out the highway related aspects of the State and community highway safety programs, under the policy direction and technical guidance of the Office of Highway Safety.

    2. The Regional Federal Highway Administrator has been delegated authority (jointly with appropriate NHTSA Official) to:

        (1) Approve Multi-year Comprehensive Plans;

        (2) Determine State Agency acceptability;

        (3) Approve Annual Work Programs;

        (4) Execute Agreements; and

        (5) Grant Authorization to Proceed.

    3. In discharging the authority delegated to him, the Regional Federal Highway Administrator or his designee in cooperation with the Regional Administrator, NHTSA, shall:

        (1) Establish an acceptable balance of activity among safety Standards;

        (2) Assure the adequacy of planning and administration;

        (3) Review activity in closely associated Standards administered by NHTSA; and

        (4) Prepare (or concur in) all responses to Governors' Representatives which involve the total safety program

    4. Program monitoring, reporting and technical assistance involving the highway-related Standards will be accomplished by FHWA field offices working through the Governor's Representative with State agencies and political subdivisions. The extent of monitoring and reporting will vary from region to region and State to State. It will depend, to a great extent on the thoroughness of monitoring and reporting procedures in each State. The FHWA efforts is not intended to replace or reduce the monitoring required of the Governor's Representative, but rather to assure that his procedures are sufficient to meet the needs of FHWA. Monitoring and reporting should be adequate to:

        (1) Identify where technical assistance is needed;

        (2) Identify problem areas which may require program adjustments in order to more effectively utilize available resources; and

        (3) Measure progress toward implementing the approved AWP by the State and local political subdivisions.

  4. FHWA DIVISIONS

    1. In keeping with FHWA policy of maximum decentralization, the Division offices have been delegated those program responsibilities that can be carried out most effectively and efficiently at the State level. Among these are:

        (1) Coordinate with and assist the Governor's Representative;

        (2) Receive, review, and either recommend or take action regarding the State's comprehensive plan and annual work program;

        (3) Provide technical assistance and advice to State and local governments; and

        (4) Monitor and evaluate State and local highway safety programs.

    2. Under the direction of his Regional Administrator, the FHWA Division Administrator should coordinate assigned highway safety program activities with the appropriate NHTSA field official(s).

2 - FHWA SAFETY PROGRAM GOALS, OBJECTIVES
AND NATIONAL EMPHASIS PROGRAM

I - Goals and Objectives

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976
(HHS-10)

Par.

  1. Goals

  2. Objectives

  1. GOALS

    The goals of the highway safety program are: (1) to reduce deaths,(2) to minimize the frequency and severity of injuries, and (3) to decrease the property damage resulting from the use of the highway transportation system which includes all public roads regardless of jurisdictional responsibility. These can be stated in other ways, but the ultimate aim is the reduction of human and economic losses on the Nation' highway transportation system. Since these goals are stated in quantifiable terms, progress can be measured by changes in the numbers and rates of death and injuries, and property damage costs resulting from automobile accidents.

  2. OBJECTIVES

    1. The short term objectives of FHWA's safety effort involving the highway related Standards are to work with State and their local jurisdictions, through the Governors' Representative, to achieve implementation of high priority standard features of the comprehensive plan.

    2. The long-range objective of the FHWA highway safety effort is full implementation of the highway related Standards.

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Emphasis Program

    1. Accurate Identification of Accident Locations

    2. Traffic Engineering Capability

    3. Skid Accident Reduction Program

    4. Uniform Regulatory and Warning Signs

    5. Pedestrian Crossing Program

  3. Program Appraisal

  1. INTRODUCTION

    In 1972, the National Emphasis Program (NEP) was instituted to establish certain desirable national goals in connection with highway-related Safety Program Standards. The goals were established to encourage the States to build a basic capability for identifying problem areas and developing corrective measures. The target date for meeting these goals was December 31, 1975. Although some States met the goals in some areas, no State has met the goals in all areas. Since establishing the NEP, FHWA has adopted the practice of stating annual Program Emphasis Areas. This practice obviates the need for updating NEP goals; how ever, it remains desirable that all States meet the previously established NEP goals as soon as possible. Each Division Administrator should meet with appropriate State highway officials and highway safety officials to establish completion dates for all uncompleted NEP goals. Completion dated should be the earliest possible dates and they should, in no case, be later than those dates established for compliance in other FHWA directives(e.g., Federal-Aid Highway Program Manual (FHPM) 6-8-3-1, Traffic Control Devices on Federal-Aid and other Street and Highways). The Division Administrator should monitor the State's activity in achieving the NEP goals.

  2. EMPHASIS PROGRAM

    1. ACCURATE IDENTIFICATION OF ACCIDENT LOCATION - All states should be able to accurately identify accident locations to within one-tenth of a mile in rural areas and to within 100 feet in urban areas on their Federal-aid and State highway systems. The reference system and accident reference file should be designed and maintained to permit rapid entry and retrieval of the data in a formusable by engineers and others in the development of appropriate countermeasures and be compatible with other information in the Statewide traffic records system. This same accuracy should be obtained for all public roads within each State as soon as possible.

    2. Traffic Engineering Capability - Traffic engineering expertise should be available to all jurisdictions within the State having responsibility for public roads. This expertise can be provided through training of existing employees, employment of qualified personnel, or part-time consulting services from public or private agencies. This capability should be established in all cities with a population of 50,000 or more, and all counties of 250,000 or more. Cities of over 25,000 population should have the traffic engineering capability as defined in Highway Safety Program Manual (HSPM) Volume 13 as soon as possible.

    3. Skid Accident Reduction Program - Each State should inventory all paved roads with posted speed limit of 40 m.p.h. or greater for skid resistance. A program should be prepared which establishes priorities for correcting locations with a disproportionately high percentage of skidding accidents and for pavements where the coefficient of friction is less than the recommended minimum Skid Numbers (SN) included in HSPM Volume 12. Such a Statewide inventory for skid resistance should be established and in operation.

    4. Uniform Regulatory and Warning Signs - Each State should bring all warning and regulatory signs into conformance with the provisions of the 1971 edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). (See FHPM 6-8-3-1).

    5. Pedestrian Crossing Program - Using data obtained from implementation of Paragraph 2a, Accurate Identification of Accident Locations, each State, and especially its political subdivisions, should identify high hazard pedestrian crossings. These crossings should be identified and systematic plan for improvement established.

  3. PROGRAM APPRAISAL

    The Annual Work Program (described in HSPM Vol. 103), and the Comprehensive Plan (described in HSPM Vol. 102) should reflect this program. Any State which does not include these activities in its Comprehensive Plan and/or Annual Work Program will be expected to justify the omission on the basis of its special safety needs.

3 - FUNDING ELIGIBILITY

I - General Eligibility Criteria

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Characteristics of Fundable Tasks and Subelements

  3. Ineligible Activities

  1. INTRODUCTION

    Certain criteria must be satisfied if tasks or subelements included in the annual work program are to be eligible for funding by the FHWA under 23 U.S.C. 402. General criteria are included in the following paragraphs. Eligibility questions not covered herein should be referred to the Office of Highway Safety, FHWA.

  2. CHARACTERISTICS OF FUNDABLE TASKS AND SUBELEMENTS

    1. Tasks should be directed toward the objective of reducing the frequency and severity of motor vehicle accidents. Tasks should be oriented toward long term benefits. Although there are safety benefits to operational improvements, highway safety funds should be limited to activities with the above stated objectives.

    2. Subelements may be jointly funded using Section 402 safety funds and other Federal funds as appropriate. Joint funding may be used either to increase available resources for eligible safety activities or to participate in the cost of activities not totally eligible for safety funding. In either situation, a satisfactory means of assigning costs should be accomplished prior to the authorization to proceed.

    3. Tasks involving studies. surveys, inventories, collection and analysis of data, etc., should be directed toward identifying accident locations, defining hazards, determining needs and deficiencies in the highway related Standard areas, developing programs for correction ofidentified hazards and high accident locations, and evaluating the effectiveness of improvements.

    4. Benefits of tasks must be related to the goal of reducing traffic deaths, injuries and property damage. These benefits should, where practical, be measurable in quantitative terms.

  3. INELIGIBLE ACTIVITIES

    Section 402(g), Title 23, United States Code prohibits the expenditure of safety funds for "...(1) highway construction, maintenance, or design (other than design of safety features of highways to be incorporated into standards) or (2) any purpose for which funds are authorized by section 403 of this title...". However, the intent of Congress regarding this prohibition, as clarified in House Report 91-1554, 91st Cong. 2d Sess. (1970) p. 27, permits the expenditure of "...such funds for installation of regulatory and warning signs on non-Federal-aid highways and the installation of field reference markers designed specifically to meet highway safety Standard requirements...".

3 - FUNDING ELIGIBILITY

II - Research, Development and Demonstration

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976
(HS-10)

Par.

  1. Background

  2. Eligibility Guidelines

  1. BACKGROUND

    1. Section 402(g), Title 23, United States Code prohibits the use of section 402 highway safety funds for any purpose for which Section 403 funds are authorized. The purposes of this prohibition are: (1) to ensure that funds available under Section 402 are used to help the States initiate new safety activities and improve or expand safety activities now in existence; (2) to ensure that research programs are carried out under Sections 403 and 307; and (3) to avoid the unnecessary duplication of effort and expenditures which would occur if each State were to undertake its own safety research and development program with Federal assistance.

  2. ELIGIBILITY GUIDELINES

    1. Section 403 authorized the expansion of the highway safety research and development activities under 23 U.S.C. 307(a) to cover all aspects of highway safety. Section 403 is predicated on the grounds that traffic safety research must be conducted from a total systems point of view.

    2. While the use of Section 402 highway safety funds is prohibited for the type of research and development activities authorized by Section 403, applied research activities may qualify for Section 402 fund participation provided: (1) the research activities are conducted as a necessary and preliminary incident to a State functional safety program, and (2) the State is committed to use theresults of such preliminary research in continuing or implementing the functional safety program activity. A demonstration project, clearly related to development of a new approach to one of the program elements or the improvement of an old one, falls within the limits of Section 402. As an example, the testing of relative effectiveness of various skid resistance surface treatments, preliminary to the adoption of a statewide program to implement features of Standard 12 would be eligible for Section 402 funding. The work is considered to be a necessary preliminary phase to a Statewide program under Section 402.

3 - FUNDING ELIGIBILITY

III Guidelines for Funding Specific Tasks

M 7560.3
February 18, 1975
(HHS-10)

Par.

  1. Field Reference Systems

  2. Training

  3. Highway Safety Needs Studies

  4. Warning and Regulatory Signs

  5. Skid Resistance Program

  6. Bridge Inspections

  7. Equipment Purchases

  8. Public Information

Appendix A - Typical Tasks

  1. FIELD REFERENCE SYSTEMS

    1. House report No. 91-1554 relating to the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1970, indicated that Congress intended Section 402 to be interpreted in a manner which will not preclude the use of highway safety funds for the installation of field reference markers designed specifically to meet highway safety Standard requirements.

    2. Therefore, these funds may be used for designing and installing field reference systems both on and off the Federal-aid highway system provided the work proposed is basically a nonoperational feature designed primarily to meet the highway safety Standard requirements. Field accident reference systems financed under the Highway Safety Act must meet the requirements for accuracy of accident locations established in HSPM, Volume 9. In addition, the field reference system must provide accident location information that can be incorporated into the State's traffic record system.

  2. TRAINING

    1. Training necessary to support State or local safety programs is eligible for Federal participation with Section 402 funds subject to certain constraints.

        (1) Personnel trained must be readily identified with a State or local safety program. In addition, the sponsoring State or local agency must agree to utilize the personnel trained in support of its safety program.

        (2) For training which exceeds 80 hours of instruction, the employee must agree to remain in the employ of the sponsoring State or local agency for a period equal to three times the length of the training, but not less than three months. Failure to continue in the service of his employer (by employee's action) for the specified period will require repayment of training costs.

        (3) Costs for enrollment fees, tuition, training aids, travel expenses, per diem, salaries, etc. which are incidental to the required training are eligible for Federal participation. Charges for these items should be comparable to costs paid by the State or local agency for similar training.

        (4) Training activities are expected to be relatively short term in duration--less than one academic year.

        (5) Developing course content as part of a safety training project for specific State and local agencies may be eligible if features or content is/are unique to the agency involved. Care should be taken to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort in developing course content and designing safety training programs.

    2. In an effort to accomplish this objective, course content together with teaching aids, etc., utilized in a Section 402 training effort involving the three-plus Standards should be forwarded to the Director, Office of Highway Safety, FHWA, through the Regional Federal Highway Administrator.

    3. Although the Regional Federal Highway Administrator (together with the NHTSA Regional Administrator) approves training as an integral part of the annual work program, a training activity for any course which involves content development must be forwarded to the Office of Highway Safety for review for duplication and to provide information from similar courses as appropriate.

  3. HIGHWAY SAFETY NEEDS STUDIES

    1. Studies to determine the magnitude of safety needs and the development of programs to meet these needs are eligible for Section 402 funding.

    2. The scope and detail of eligible studies may vary according to study purposes. Each study proposed for Federal funding must be supported by a plan for its use in implementing one or more elements of one or more safety Standards.

    3. Types of studies which are eligible include:

        (1) An estimate of funds required for a State to fully implement all of the highway safety Standards during a specified time period. This may be based on sampling and/or projections. These studies which have specific value in budgeting and staffing matters, should relate needs to current and future expenditure levels.

        (2) An estimate similar to (1) but pertaining to specific Standards or Standard elements and/or to selected local jurisdictions.

        (3) An estimate similar to (1) or (2) but based on actual inventories and studies to the extent that work categories for specific jurisdictions or highway systems are identified. This type of study may encompass procedures for determining priorities and for developing action programs (SEP'S).

  4. WARNING AND REGULATORY SIGNS

    1. Congress, during deliberations on the 1970 Federal-Aid Highway Act, specifically indicated (Page 27, HouseReport 91-1554) that 402 funds could be used to install regulatory and warning signs off the Federal-aid highway system. Installation is interpreted to include costs incurred in obtaining and erecting these traffic control devices.

    2. The installation of the signs must be part of a systematic program to reduce crashes as a result of more effective and uniform control devices. Sign installation is eligible for funding under three different types of activities:

        (1) The installation of signs to reduce the number of crashes identified at high accident locations.

        (2) The installation of signs to reduce potential hazard documented on the basis of engineering studies.

        (3) The upgrading of regulatory and warning signs with the new sign designs which are mandatory requirements in the 1971 Edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices.

    3. The program must be a part of a systematic program to replace nonconforming regulatory and warning signs. The program must also be coordinated with sign replacement programs on the Federal-aid highway system.

  5. SKID RESISTANCE PROGRAM

    1. Skid resistance programs for all public roads and streets are eligible regardless of system designation or jurisdictional responsibility.

    2. Eligible areas of activity include:

        (1) special analyses of accident data directed towards identifying skidding problem areas (i.e. wet vs dry pavement accident problem);

        (2) conducting skid inventories including:

          (a) obtaining equipment to measure skid resistance;

          (b) operating that equipment while inventorying skid resistance qualities;

        (3) developing priority programs to improve high accident-low skid number locations;

        (4) evaluating the effectiveness of these improvements; and

        (5) travel of personnel to skid test centers for training.

    3. The actual improvement of identified locations can not be accomplished with Section 402 funds.

  6. BRIDGE INSPECTION

    1. Highway safety funds are available for bridge inspection activities only on roads and streets not on the State highway system. State highway departments have developed the necessary resources to carry out these kinds of programs on the State highway system, but counties and municipalities generally do not have such resources. The use of available funds must be limited to those areas with the greatest need.

    2. Bridge inspection activities should be a part of the overall program to improve highway safety through identification and elimination of roadway hazards. The inspection must provide the information necessary to establish safe load limits.

    3. Particular emphasis in the inspection procedures should be given to design details on the bridge and its approaches which might affect operational safety. The inspection also should include the problem of functional obsolescence, because of hazards resulting from substandard or outdated designs.

    4. Inspection should include identification of such hazards as poorly placed guardrails, poor guardrail-bridge parapet transition, projecting curbs and similar features. The adequacy, placement and condition of traffic control devices on the bridge and its approachesalso should be evaluated. These would include load limit signs, height restrictions, warning and advisory signing, pavement markings, paint markings on the bridge structure, and other traffic control devices.

  7. EQUIPMENT PURCHASES

    1. Costly equipment items are frequently involved in the development and implementation of highway safety activities. To insure the most advantageous application of highway safety funds the following criteria for the purchase of equipment have been established:

        (1) The capability provided by the equipment does not presently exist.

        (2) The need for the equipment is satisfactorily documented.

        (3) The equipment represents a significant need of a planned safety activity.

        (4) Rental equipment is not available or practical.

    2. Equipment purchased with Section 402 funds must continue in use in the safety program or appropriate salvage value credited to the program upon termination of equipment use.

  8. PUBLIC INFORMATION

    1. Public information activities which are necessary to implement specific features of the Standards are eligible for 402 funding. Two examples of eligible public information programs are:

        (1) A program to inform the public on the use of field accident reference systems with the objective to obtain more accurate accident location data.

        (2) A program to inform the public about the meaning of traffic control devices in the MUTCD which maybe necessary to increase public acceptance and understand of the new devices. This activity, in order to be eligible, must be coordinated with aprogram for installation of new types of signing in accordance with the MUTCD.

    2. Public information activities should be considered eligible for Federal participation if an affirmative response can be given to the following questions:

        (1) Is the public information activity part of a systematic program to implement an element of the Standards?

        (2) Is the activity necessary to accomplish the objectives of the program involved?

        (3) Does the activity have a clearly defined purpose?

TYPICAL TASKS

Standard 9 -- Identification and Surveillance of Accident Locations

  1. Means of identifying accident experience and losses.

      -- Photologging highways for accident location reference.

      -- Cooperative effort by a number of counties to develop a uniform field reference system for roads under their jurisdiction.

      -- Development of a computerized traffic accident location system for the purpose of fast, accurate, and economical access to accident files and statistics.

      -- Improve present computerized accident surveillance system to reduce time spent on manual tabulations.

      -- Development of computer techniques to produce collision diagrams.

      -- Adding traffic volume information and highway inventory data to computerized accident data files to improve the capability to identify hazardous location and routes.

      -- State furnishing reports to local jurisdictions of high accident locations and hazardous areas in their jurisdictions.

      -- Develop standard procedures for the identification and surveillance of high accident locations by a small city that can be used as a guide by other small cities.

      -- Inventory need, plan and install field reference system for accident location.

  2. Investigation and evaluation.

      -- On-site investigation, analysis, and ranking of high accident locations.

      -- Multidisciplinary teams to investigate accident sites in order to determine the design and operating features with which highway accident frequencies or \severities are associated.

      -- Investigate and evaluate intersections with high nighttime accident rates.

      -- Develop programs for improvements at high accident locations and corrections to design and operating features that contribute to accidents.

      -- Follow-up analyses to determine the effectiveness of improvements.

  3. Personnel and training.

      -- Hire traffic engineers to assist local jurisdictions in identifying and correcting high accident locations.

      -- Train selected employees to recognize existing potential hazards and take corrective actions to eliminate thehazards before accidents take place.

      -- Hire personnel to analyze accident and develop improvement programs.

Standard 12 -- Highway Design, Construction and Maintenance

  1. Skid Resistance.

      -- Acquire skid trailer.

      -- Calibrate skid test equipment.

      -- Make inventories of skid resistance at high (skidding) accident locations to determine wearing characteristics to determine friction characteristics on structures to predict high skidding accident locations to test various skid resistant materials to establish priorities for improving skid resistance.

  2. Railroad grade crossing.

      -- Study feasibility of upgrading, consolidating, relocating, or abandoning railroad grade crossings.

      -- Inventory railroad-highway crossings to determine deficiencies, identify hazards and develop corrective measures.

  3. Lighting.

      -- Inventory lighting, determine needs and develop upgrading program and lighting policies.

  4. Design Standards.

      -- Develop Standards for local road, traffic engineering, and public works agencies -- by State forces.

      -- Develop roadway design manual.

      -- Study Standards now in use and develop upgraded manuals.

      -- Develop guidelines for safety design of residential streets.

      -- Develop design specifications for skid test equipment.

  5. Fixed objects and roadside hazards.

      -- Study single vehicle/fixed object accidents and develop corrective measures.

      -- Develop guidelines for urban streets relating to fixed object placement and accident potential.

      -- Identify high and potentially high fixed object accident locations and confirm design of inertial barrier.

      -- Conduct bridge hazard inventory on non-State road system.

  6. Provide assistance to local jurisdictions in program planning and in project development and design.

  7. Provide training in highway safety-related design.

  8. Purchase equipment such as a pavement striping machine for the joint use of two or more small communities.

  9. Curb ramps for the handicapped.

      -- Disseminate information, specifications and standards about curb ramps for the handicapped.

      -- Develop plans for determining curb ramp locations.

  10. Provide guidance and inspect construction repair sites and detours.

  11. Determine condition of bridges.

  12. Conduct final inspections of safety features to insure proper installations.

Standard 13 -- Traffic Engineering Services

  1. Manpower and training.

      -- Conduct a Statewide manpower needs study of traffic engineering capability.

      -- Conduct short courses and workshops in safety related traffic engineering applications.

      -- Training of traffic engineers and traffic engineering technicians at short courses and seminars in safety related curriculums.

      -- Provide traffic engineering guidance to local jurisdictions.

  2. Inventories and needs.

      -- Automation of the State's record keeping and data retrieval procedures for inventorying traffic control devices.

      -- Inventory traffic control devices in a city, establish needs and deficiencies, and establish improvement program including preventive maintenance.

      -- Study sample cities to identify traffic engineering safety needs in urban areas. These studies will be used as the basis for additional studies in other small communities.

  3. Program implementation.

      -- Develop and print a State Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices to supplement the National Manual.

      -- Prepare preventive maintenance manual for traffic signs, signals, and markings.

      -- Establish criteria for nighttime inspection maintenance program for traffic control devices.

      -- Traffic engineering study of signalized intersections in city to determine improvements which can be implemented to increase safety.

      -- Study a number of major unsignalized intersections to determine if signal installations are warranted.

      -- Study and make recommendations for a signal system in the central business district with special emphasis on reducing pedestrian-vehicle conflicts.

      -- Determine reasonable speeds for highways.

      -- Demonstrate traffic engineering and traffic control device improvements.

  4. Program evaluation.

      -- The evaluation of improvements, including before-and-after accident studies and cost-effectiveness determinations.

Standard 14 -- Pedestrian Safety

  1. School child protection.

      -- Crossing protection studies.

      -- Implement "Safe Route to School" plan.

  2. Pedestrian accident studies and development of recommendations for improvement.

  3. Inventory of pedestrian-oriented controls and development of needs correction plans.

  4. Crosswalk safety improvement program development through use of a system of specialized crosswalk lighting, driver and pedestrian warnings and pedestrian and vehicular signals.

  5. Curb ramp plans and specifications.

  6. Community-wide pedestrian safety planning.

  7. Analyze and prepare plan for area-wide bike route network.

4 - HIGHWAY SAFETY COORDINATION

I - Coordination With Other FHWA Programs

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976
HHS-10

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Highway Safety Improvement Programs

  3. TOPICS

  4. Traffic Control Devices Improvement Program

  5. Highway Planning Program

  6. Motor Carrier Safety Program

  7. Railroad-Highway Grade Crossing Safety Program

  8. Design and Operational Review Teams

  1. INTRODUCTION

    1. Highway safety is an integral part of all FHWA programs. Some FHWA programs have highway safety as their prime goal while others have indirect or spin-off highway safety benefits. Still other programs require coordination with the highway-related Standards because of the similarity of program activities.

    2. The areas of coordination identified in the following paragraphs should not be considered all inclusive but only the more significant areas needing coordination.

  2. HIGHWAY SAFETY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS

    1. In 1964, the President directed FHWA to develop a priority highway safety program with emphasis on hazards identified through accident experience. This was the beginning of the Highway Safety Improvement Program whose latest direction was established by the Highway Safety Act of 1973. This Act calls for each State to develop and implement on a continuing basis a highway safety improvement program including logical and comprehensive procedures for the selection, scheduling, construction, and evaluation of highway safety improvement projects, on all highways, with the specific objective of reducing thenumber and severity of accidents. This program is administered by the Office of Traffic Operations. Guidelines are included in Federal-Aid Highway Program Manual (FHPM) 6-8-2-1 and FHPM 6-8-3-5.

    2. Safety improvement projects on the Federal-aid highway system are eligible for regular Federal-aid funds apportioned under 23 U.S.C. 104(b) at the normal pro-rata share. Specific categories of safety improvements on the Federal-aid highway system other than Interstate are eligible for funds authorized by 23 U.S.C. 151, 152, and 153 and by Section 203 of the Highway Safety Act of 1973. Specific categories of safety improvements on any highway not on a Federal-aid system are eligible for funds authorized by 23 U.S.C. 151 and 405. The Federal share of projects funded from authorizations under 23 U.S.C. 152, 153, and 405 and Section 203 of the Highway Safety Act of 1973 shall be 90 percent of the cost, while the Federal share under 23 U.S.C. 151 is 100 percent.

    3. Surveys, needs studies and the evaluation of these improvements may be accomplished with highway safety funds.

    4. For additional guidelines on funding, refer to FHPM 6-8-2-1, Paragraph 8, and FHPM 6-8-3-5, Paragraph 6.

    5. The Highway Safety Act of 1973 requires certain reports or programs under 23 U.S.C. 151, 152, 153, and Section 203 of the 1973 Act. The States must report on their programs annually. This report is due in the FHWA Headquarters office on September 30 of each year. The Act also requires that a report be submitted to Congress on January 1 each year for these programs. The report to Congress is developed from the information included in the States reports to the Federal Highway Administration. Highway Safety Program manual (HSPM) Vol. 103, Chap. VII, Par. 4 which identifies reporting requirements for the 23 U.S.C. 402 highway safety program requires that the annual report on the 402 program also include an evaluation of the States' overall Highway Safety Improvement Program. This report can be used to satisfy the required reports for the programs under 23 U.S.C. 151, 152, 153, and Section 203 of the 1973 Act, provided it specifically responds to the requirements of FHPM 6-8-2-1, Paragraph 9, and FHPM 6-8-3-5, Paragraph 7. This will reduce duplication and ease the burden on the States. The combined report is recommended.

  3. TOPICS

    1. The TOPICS program was authorized by the Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1968 to reduce traffic congestion and increase highway safety in urban areas through operational and/or capital improvements. No specific funds are presently authorized for TOPICS, but Congress clearly expressed its intent to provide \continunity for this program by making Federal-aid highway funds available for TOPICS type projects. This will include, in some instances, funds authorized under Title II of the 1973 Highway Act as well as urban extension and urban system funds.

    2. Guidelines for TOPICS programs are included in FHPM 6-8-2-2.

    3. Two sources of Federal FHWA funds may be involved in some of the studies requisite to initiating TOPICS related studies--highway safety funds and Highway Planning and Research funds. Steps should be taken to assure that funds complement rather than duplicate effort.

    4. Highway safety funds may be used to identify hazardous locations, conduct accident data analyses and develop safety countermeasures in urban areas under 50,000 population for implementation (on the Federal-aid system) using Federal-aid highway funds.

    5. Evaluation of the safety related effectiveness of these improvements may be accomplished with highway safety funds.

    6. The financing of all studies requisite to initiating TOPICS improvements, may qualify for joint funding (See Highway Safety Program Management Guide (HSPMG) Volume 3, Chapter I, Par. 2b). The use of highway safety funds for jointly funded studies will be limited to that portion which is safety related.

  4. TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM

    1. The Highway Safety Act requires the Secretary of Transportation to set uniform Highway Safety Program Standards. Among these is the application of traffic control devices. This authority has been delegated to the Federal Highway Administrator who has endorsed the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) as the National Standard on all public roadways. Highway Safety Program Standard 13, Par. C, requires that a traffic control device plan be developed within each State, including: (1) an inventory; (2) a periodic comparison of the inventory to the MUTCD or its equivalent and development of an upgrading plan; (3) development of a preventive maintenance and repair plan; and (4) the utilization of new ideas and concepts, where appropriate to improve traffic control.

    2. New ideas and concepts are to be reviewed by the National Advisory Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices and approved by the Federal Highway Administrator before being implemented. Devices which fulfill a need not described in the MUTCD also should be reviewed by the National Advisory Committee to determine it they are in keeping with the principles in the MUTCD.

    3. Traffic control devices on all public roads and streets shall conform with the provisions in the MUTCD.

    4. Coordination should be established among activities funded with highway safety and Highway Planning and Research funds for implementing the features of the MUTCD.

  5. HIGHWAY PLANNING PROGRAM

    1. For many years State highway departments have included highway safety activities as an integral part of their Highway Planning and Research (HP&R) Work Program. Safety considerations have historically played an important part in establishing priorities for capital improvement programs prepared by highway planning.

    2. Many of the same highway safety activities are eligible for both highway safety and HP&R funding. Highway safetyfunds should be used to complement rather than replace HP&R funded safety activities. Although many States have concentrated their highway planning activities on State and/or Federal-aid System(s), it should be noted that at least 40 percent of the highway safety funds available to each State must be spent by the local political subdivisions.

    3. By closely coordinating the HP&R and highway safety funds, highway safety activities can be expanded and duplication avoided. Close coordination is maintained in Washington between the Office of Highway Safety and the Office of Highway Planning. Similar coordination should be maintained in the FHWA field offices between those responsible for each program.

    4. The resources of the State planning offices should be used to the extent practicable for highway safety-related studies both on and off the Federal-aid systems. Such data can provide essential input to safety needs studies. Where practicable, single efforts should be made to serve several purposes.

  6. MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY PROGRAM

    1. The motor carrier safety program administered by FHWA is a national safety regulatory program which covers firms and drivers which operate medium and heavy trucks and buses in interstate commerce. This program covers driver qualifications, hours of service, safety of vehicles and operations, maintenance and inspection, and accident reporting.

    2. As a part of the motor carrier safety program, some 50,000 motor carrier filed accident reports are received and reviewed, and more than 300 in-depth accident investigations are conducted each year by FHWA motor carrier safety staff. Where allegations or findings or highway-related deficiencies are contained in these reports, the information is furnished to the highway engineering staff for information and appropriate action.

    3. The information contained in these accident reports could be used to point up high accident locations or conditions for safety improvement programs, or potentialprojects to enhance safety on the highways. These range from signing and traffic control to problems with super-elevation of cloverleaf interchanges which are specific hazards to commercial vehicles, but not necessarily to automobile traffic.

  7. RAILROAD-HIGHWAY GRADE CROSSING SAFETY PROGRAM

    1. The Department of Transportation - Association of American Railroads National Grade Crossing Inventory and Numbering Project provides an engineering survey of all railroad-highway crossings to identify those crossing which may require separation, relocation or warning devices.

    2. The FHWA has several ongoing programs which contribute to the greater safety of these crossings. Through the Highway Planning and Research Program, FHWA and the States have formed diagnostic teams (comprised of representatives of appropriate State agencies, railroad companies, FHWA and others) to study hazardous crossings, establish priority improvement programs, and consider on-the-scene improvements at grade crossings.

    3. Highway Safety funds can be used to identify and tabulate all railroad-highway grade crossings and to develop a program for the elimination of hazards at dangerous crossings (Highway Safety Program Standard 12, Par. I.G.). Under certain circumstances these funds may also be used for the installation (including purchase) of warning and regulatory signs in accordance with the MUTCD for crossings off the Federal-aid System (see HSPMG Volume 3, Chapter III, Par. 4).

    4. There are several choices of funds available for improving railroad crossings. Regular Federal-aid funds under the provisions of Section 130, Title 23, U.S.C. are available for major improvements such as grade separations or active forms of protection on the Federal-Aid System. Funds authorized under Section 203 of the Highway Safety Act of 1973 are also available for this type of work on Federal-aid systems at a 90 percent participating ratio. The law requires that at least half of the Section 203 funds be made available for passive protection such as warning signs and pavement markings. Section 405 and Section 219 funds may be used for railroad crossing improvements on off-system roads.

    5. To promote the greatest effectiveness of railroad-highway grade crossing safety close coordination must be maintained among the interrelated FHWA programs. In addition, Washington headquarters coordinates FHWA programs with those of the Federal Railroad Administration.

  8. DESIGN AND OPERATIONAL REVIEW TEAMS

    1. As early as 1966, the Bureau of Public Roads, predecessor of FHWA, urged its division engineers to work with State highway departments to establish design review teams "...to insure continuance of satisfactory design practices and to eliminate or correct those which have proven inferior..."

    2. The highway-related Standards apply to all roads, streets and highways open to public travel. This means that country and municipal governments with responsibility for streets and roads should establish design and operation review teams. These teams should be trained to recognize and recommend improvements for safety hazards: in design concepts; in construction and maintenance practices; and at identified high accident and high hazard locations.

    3. Design and operational review teams should first study recently completed highway projects and identified high accident locations under varying operating conditions (i.e. weather, traffic volumes, day/night) and then as time permits, make a systematic review of all roads and streets to identify potential hazards.

    4. Design and operational review teams should include members with responsibility for design, construction, maintenance, safety, traffic operation, aesthetics and law enforcement. In local jurisdictions, one individual may be responsible for more than one of these items.

    5. Coordination should be maintained between the design and operational review teams and other closely related highway safety activities.

4 - HIGHWAY SAFETY COORDINATION

II Coordination with NHTSA

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Washington Headquarters Coordination

  3. Regional Office Coordination

  4. FHWA Division Office Coordination

  1. INTRODUCTION

    The Highway Safety Act of 1970 divided responsibility between FHWA and NHTSA for administering the safety Standards, however, Congress indicated in House Report 91-1554 p.29 that "... it is essential to administrative workability and success of the program there be one central State agency through which the State's program is carried out ...". To simplify policies and procedures for that Sate agency, each Administration, in coordination with the other, has avowed its intent to maintain the single highway safety program concept in discharging its highway safety program responsibility.

  2. WASHINGTON HEADQUARTERS COORDINATION

    1. The FHWA and NHTSA Headquarters Offices coordinate their efforts in planning and administering the State and community highway safety program and in developing and promulgating national policies and procedures pertaining thereto. Policies and procedures which affect the total program are issued jointly while those which pertain to a specific Standard continue to be issued by the Administration responsible for that Standard.

    2. Coordination between FHWA and the NHTSA Washington headquarters concerning State and community highway safety programs is accomplished through the FHWA Office of Highway Safety except when otherwise provided by interagency agreement.

  3. REGIONAL OFFICE COORDINATION

    1. Close coordination between the regional offices of FHWA and NHTSA is essential to joint program administration. Actions regarding the State's annual work programs and comprehensive plans must reflect the concurrence of both Administrations.

      Program guidance and/or requests originating in the field offices(FHWA and NHTSA) which pertain to the total program also require the concurrence of both Administrations. Concurrence is not required for action pertaining to specific Standards, however, coordination should be provided where Standards administered by one Administration interact with Standards administered by the other.

    2. It is the responsibility of FHWA and NHTSA regional offices to develop coordination procedures within their regions consistent with the above guidelines and the requirements of jointly issued directives.

  4. FHWA DIVISION OFFICE COORDINATION

    The extent of coordination required of the FHWA division office is contingent upon delegations of authority to that office. As division office involvement in the safety program increases, it will become necessary to coordinate itsactivity with its regional office and with appropriate officials of the NHTSA regional office. Procedures to establish the desired coordination must have the concurrence of both Administrations.

4 - HIGHWAY SAFETY COORDINATION

III - Shared Responsibilities

M 7560.3
February 18, 1976

Par.

  1. Introduction

  2. Fiscal Procedures

  3. Audits

  4. Civil Rights Assurances

  5. Environmental Impact Reviews

  6. OST Notification of AWP Authorization

  7. Coordination of Federal Assistance Programs

  8. Rules of Procedure for Invoking Sanctions Under the Highway Safety Act of 1966

  9. Incentive Grants for Reduction of Highway Fatality Rates

  10. Annual Report to Congress

  1. INTRODUCTION

    In an effort to simplify procedures and conserve resources for the Governors' Representatives, FHWA and NHTSA have assigned by agreement certain functions to one Administration. That Administration fulfills the requirements for both FHWA and NHTSA. Functions which are partially or completely administered in this manner are identified in the following paragraphs.

  2. FISCAL PROCEDURES

    1. Authority for obligating funds in the highway-related Standards rests with FHWA. Likewise, NHTSA has obligating authority for the driver and vehicle Standards. Subject to availability, Federal funds are obligated through a jointly signed (FHWA-NHTSA) authorization to proceed. Federal funds are available for reimbursement of eligible expenditures after the AWP agreement is signed by the State, FHWA and NHTSA. This authorization to proceed may be granted prior to or simultaneously with execution of the AWP agreement.

    2. By memorandum of agreement funds assigned to FHWA are transferred to NHTSA to liquidate obligations incurred in FHWA Standards. The NHTSA Regional Financial Manager records obligations, processes the States' claims for reimbursement and provides FHWA with appropriate reports.

    3. All progress and final vouchers are submitted to the NHTSA Regional Administrator. Copies of progress vouchers for the highway-related Standards are forwarded to the FHWA Region (or Division) office following payment by NHTSA. Final vouchers for the highway-related Standards are forwarded to the FHWA Regional Administrator or his designee for review and acceptance to ensure satisfactory completion of the project, Task or Subelement Plan. Following acceptance by FHWA, final payment can be made and the project closed. In the event a project is partially or totally unacceptable, Federal funds previously paid will be recovered by appropriate deductions from other vouchers. In the event the State submits a single final voucher for an entire AWP, FHWA may, following appropriate review, verify FHWA acceptability of highway-related activity completed and ensure that uncompleted activity is included in the new AWP.

  3. AUDITS

    By memorandum of agreement FHWA conducts external audits pertaining to the State and Community Highway Safety program for both FHWA and NHTSA. The audit activity is carried out in accordance with FHWA policies, standards, and procedures which are coordinated with NHTSA, as appropriate. Basic FHWA external audit policies and standards are contained in FHWA Orders 2950.1; 2950.2; and 2950.3. These Orders are supplemented by the External Audit Manual and other directives. Policy and procedures pertaining to the release of external audit reports are included in Joint Order FHWA 5-7/NHTSA 291-1.

  4. CIVIL RIGHTS ASSURANCES

    Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration have, by interagency agreement, established areas of responsibility to assure that State and Community Highway Safety Programs comply with the requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act. The agreement provides: (1) that Title VI Assurance Forms will be transmitted to each Governor by a letter jointly signed by the Administrators, FHWA and NHTSA; (2) that signed assurances will be returned to the Administration responsible for conducting compliance reviews; (3) that FHWA will conduct compliance reviews in those States where the highway department serves as the Governor's Highway Safety Representative; (4) that NHTSA will conduct compliance reviews for all other States; and (5) that FHWA and NHTSA will each coordinate with the other and supply appropriate copies of assurances, compliance review schedules and compliance review reports.

  5. ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REVIEWS

    In accordance with Joint Order FHWA 7750.1/NHTSA 560-2, the offices with approval authority are to make an environmental impact review of the State's AWP in consultation with the Governor's Representative. For FHWA, if no major action, as defined in 23 CFR Part 771, is identified, no further environmental processing is required. If major FHWA actions are identified, appropriate environmental impact statements should be prepared and processed in accordance with the guidelines and regulations prescribed in 23 CFR Part 771.

  6. OST NOTIFICATION OF AWP AUTHORIZATION

    Joint Order FHWA 7-7/NHTSA 462-11 identifies the responsibility of each Administration regarding notification to OST of the announcement of authorization to implement the Annual Work Program. FHWA Regional Administrators shall provide NHTSA Regional Administrators with information regarding the highway-related Standards. The NHTSA Regional Administrators will provide the appropriate notification to OST.

  7. COORDINATION OF FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS

    OMB Circular A-95 provides guidance to Federal agencies regarding cooperation with State and local governments in the evaluation, review, and coordination of Federal assistanceprograms and projects. Since each State's Annual Work Program originates in a State agency designated by the Governor and includes the proposed highway safety program activity for local governments as well as State agencies, the coordination requirements are met by the State's Annual Work Program submission.

  8. RULES OF PROCEDURE FOR INVOKING SANCTIONS UNDER THE HIGHWAY SAFETY ACT OF 1966

    1. Procedures governing the imposition of highway safety program sanctions specified in 23 U.S.C. 402 were issued by the FHWA and NHTSA Administrators and published in the Federal Register on May 31, 1974, as 23 CFR Part 1206.

    2. The Administrators initiate the proceedings by making a proposed recommended determination to invoke the sanctions specified in 23 CFR Part 1206.4.

    3. As specified in 23 CFR Part 1206.5, the Administrators send the Governor of the affected State by certified mail and publish in the Federal Register a notice of the proposed recommended determination.

    4. The Notice of proposed recommended determination includes: (1) a statement of the reasons for the proposed action, including the specific highway safety program deficiencies upon which the proposed recommended determination is based; and (2) the time, date, and place for a hearing at which the affected State and any interested person may present evidence and oral or written views, or both, concerning the specified deficiencies.

    5. Part 1206 provides for informal, legislative-type hearings before a three-member hearing board. The hearing are open to the public.

    6. Following the hearing, the Administrators review the materials forwarded by the presiding officer, any prehearing conference notices, and the evidence of the Administrations regarding the affected State's program deficiencies cited in the proposed recommended determination. On the basis of the review, they issue a recommended determination and submit it and the materialthey reviewed to the Secretary.

    7. Final determination is made by the Secretary on the basis of his review of the material forwarded him by the Administrators and their recommended determination. On the basis of the review the Secretary may adopt or reject the recommended determination in whole or in part.

  9. INCENTIVE GRANTS FOR REDUCTION OF HIGHWAY FATALITY RATES

    1. Criteria for awarding incentive grants under Section 219 of the 1973 Highway Safety Act, 23 U.S.C. 402(j)(2), to the States that make the most significant progress in reducing their fatality rates were issued by the Federal Highway Administrator and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator and published in the Federal Register on March 14, 1975, as 23 CFR 1214.

    2. Approved criteria are as follows: (1) A State must have a reduction in base year rate of fatalities relative to the preceding 4-year average rate of fatalities; (2) A State must either have a fatality rate not greater than half the national rate for the base year; or (3) the State must have a fatality rate reduction of a percentage not less than 10 percent greater than that of any national fatality rate reduction.

    3. Any State which meets criterion 1, and either 2 or 3, is \eligble for an Incentive Award. The award is limited to 25 percent of that State's share of apportioned State and Community highway safety funds for the fiscal year during which the award is made.

    4. The States are notified of their incentive awards by joint letter to the Governor from the Administrators for FHWA and NHTSA. Administrative procedures for incentive grants are included in Joint FHWA/NHTSA Order 7590.1/464-6.

  10. ANNUAL REPORT TO CONGRESS

    Section 201 of the Highway Safety Act of 1966, as amended, requires preparation of comprehensive annual reports on administration of the Highway Safety Act to be submitted to the President for transmission to the Congress.

    The highway Safety Act of 1973 amended the due date from March 1 to July 1 of each year. These annual reports, prepared by NHTSA and FHWA, set forth highway safety accomplishments in carrying out purposes of the Act through States and communities, and those special programs and research pertinent to the national highway safety effort.

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