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Raleigh 2030

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The City of Raleigh recognizes the importance of developing a balanced, efficient, multi-modal transportation network that minimizes impacts to the environment and reinforces the livability of neighborhoods.

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The Raleigh skyline

Raleigh's transportation network is developed in a sustainable pattern that supports the City's future land uses and urban form, minimizes vehicle miles traveled and single-occupancy vehicles, and reduces air pollution and greenhouse gas emissions.

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Local residents enjoying trails and boat facilities near Raleigh

Raleigh's Transportation Element contains policies that will create a well-connected, multi-modal transportation network, support increased densities, help walking become more practical for short trips, support bicycling for both short- and long-distance trips, improve transit to serve frequented destinations, conserve energy resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and do so while maintaining vehicular access and circulation.

Raleigh has a well-established roadway network of approximately 130 miles of arterials and thoroughfares and 1,631 miles of collectors and local streets. While some of these roads are maintained by the NCDOT, the City itself maintains approximately 1,017 miles of thoroughfares, collectors, and local streets, as well as 1,190 miles of sidewalks, nearly 60 miles of bike-able greenway trails and bikeways, and 4 miles of bicycle lanes.

The Transportation Element of the plan contains policies that will create a well-connected, multi-modal transportation network, support increased densities, help walking become more practical for short trips, support bicycling for both short- and long-distance trips, improve transit to serve frequented destinations, conserve energy resources, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution, and do so while maintaining vehicular access and circulation. More specifically, the policies and actions within this element address the following key transportation issues:

  1. Sprawling and segregated land use patterns have led to a high dependency on single-occupancy automobile trips;
  2. There is a need for better coordination of land use and transportation project review procedures to enable efficient and connected development patterns;
  3. Road widening and new facilities to address automobile congestion are not by themselves feasible solutions to the region's mounting congestion and long commutes
  4. Even with programmed investments, the future transportation system is projected to be severely constrained by the year 2035;
  5. The enormous growth experienced and planned in Raleigh will transform the City into the center of the region, and has the potential of changing the dynamics of the region's transportation system;
  6. Traffic calming will continue to be an issue for many neighborhoods as traffic levels increase on major thoroughfares and drivers seek alternative routes using local residential streets;

Raleigh's Policies and Actions that Support Livability Include:

  1. Economic Prosperity and Equity
  2. Expanding Housing Choices
  3. Managing Growth
  4. Coordinating Land Use and Transportation
  5. Creating Greenprint Raleigh
  6. Growing Successful Neighborhoods and Communities
Updated: 01/03/2014
HUD-DOT-EPA Interagency Partnership | DOT Livability | FTA Livable & Sustainable Communities
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