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Asset Management | Bridge Technology | Operations | Pavement

Pavement Health Track Graphical User Interface, User's Manual 2.x

Introduction

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Pavement Health Track (PHT) Analysis Tool is a computer-assisted decision-making tool designed to help state highway agencies (SHA), metropolitan planning organizations (MPO), cities, and counties characterize current and future pavement network health and manage pavement deficiencies through maintenance and rehabilitation planning in a timely, cost-effective manner.

Benefits of Using the PHT Analysis Tool

The benefits of using PHT Analysis Tool include the following:

  • An effective tool for local jurisdictions to both manage pavement networks (repository of all pertinent highway inventory, traffic, maintenance and rehabilitation, and costs information
  • Highway agencies can characterize current and future pavement network health.
  • Highway agencies can estimate current and future maintenance and rehabilitation needs to achieve predetermine levels of performance.
  • Highway agencies can determine pavement network health for different levels of maintenance and rehabilitation funding.

Software Installation

The PHT Analysis tool is a software application designed for use with the Microsoft Windows® operating system.

  • Insert the PHT Analysis Tool CD into the CD drive
  • The installation should automatically start. If this does not occur, browse to the drive where the CD is located and double-click Setup.exe
  • Follow the instructions on the InstallShield® Wizard to complete installation.
  • Upon completion of the installation, a new Start Menu group, Pavement Health Track, will be created in the Windows Start menu. Also an icon will be placed on the Windows desktop.

Uninstall the PHT Analysis tool software from the Windows Control Panel.

Support Services

Information on all support services can be obtained from: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/pavement/healthtrack

Source Data

The default source data for the PHT Analysis Tool is based on the HPMS 2010 format comma-delimited text file shown in Table 20 or other state maintained Pavement Management System (PMS) electronic source data. The PHT tool acquires data from the external data sources and compiles a set of highway data made up of the data fields required for the PHT analysis. Each record in the highway data represents a highway section. The compiled highway data are permanently stored in the database for subsequent use in the PHT analysis.

PHT Analysis Procedure

The general procedure for characterizing a pavement networks health using the PHT Analysis Tool is comprised of the following steps:

  1. Importing the highway data into the analysis tool.
  2. Performing data quality checks.
  3. Defining analysis type and what-if scenarios.
  4. Running the PHT analysis.
  5. Reviewing of results.
  6. Presentation and documentation of results.

Estimating RSL

Pavement RSL at the project level typically is defined as life of a pavement from the present time until application of the first significant rehabilitation treatment or reconstruction, which would be the first significant cost expenditure for the pavement after its original construction. The placement of a structural overlay or reconstruction signals the end of a pavement's serviceable life; the application of minor maintenance treatments or thin overlays is not considered significant enough to indicate the end of pavements service life.

Significant rehabilitation occurs due to some form of pavement failure. Failure typically is described as the pavement attaining first terminal distress as shown in Figure 1. Thus, RSL is simply the time in years or remaining equivalent single axle loads (ESALs) that it would take a given pavement to attain the first terminal distress.

A set of four line charts plot curves for identifying first terminal stress and remaining service life for pavement. On the plot for faulting in inches over pavement age in years, first terminal distress is indicated at a value of 0.14 inch over 25 years. On the plot for rutting in inches over pavement age in years, first terminal stress is indicated at a value of 0.11 inch over 16 years. On the plot for percent cracked slabs over pavement age in years, first terminal stress is indicated at a value of 18 percent over 15 years. On the plot for IRI in inches per mile over pavement age in years, first terminal stress is indicated at a value of 170 inches per mile over 22 years.
Figure 1. Predicted Pavement Distress and Estimated RSL

Critical RSL

The critical RSL is the estimated time until the first terminal distress occurs. Using the example illustrated in Figure 1 for jointed plain concrete pavement (JPCP), the critical RSL is estimated as shown in Table 1. In this example, the first terminal distress is cracking, which occurs at 15 years. Since the pavement's current age is 10 years, the RSL is the difference of 5 years.

Table 1. Estimation of Critical RSL
JPCP Distress/IRI Predicted Life, yrs Current Pavement Age, yrs RSL, yrs Critical RSL
Faulting 25 10 15 5
Rutting 20 10 10 5
Cracking 15 10 5 5
IRI 22 10 12 5

Weighted Average RSL

The weighted average RSL is the estimated time until each terminal distress occurs averaged together using a user-defined weight for each distress type. Using the example illustrated in Figure 1, the weighted average RSL is estimated as shown in Table 2. In this example, each distress type is assigned an equal weight in the average calculation, resulting in an average RSL of 10.5 years.

Table 2. Estimation of Weighted Average RSL
JPCP Distress/IRI Predicted Life, yrs Current Pavement Age, yrs RSL, yrs Weight Average RSL
Faulting 25 10 15 1 10.5
Rutting 20 10 10 1 10.5
Cracking 15 10 5 1 10.5
IRI 22 10 12 1 10.5
Updated: 11/22/2013