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Coordinated Border Infrastructure Program

I. Executive Summary

From FY 1999 through FY 2003 the National Corridor Planning and Development and Coordinated Border Infrastructure (NCPD/CBI) program provided $1.1 billion to State Departments of Transportation (DOTs) and Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) for planning through construction of border and corridor related projects. It also provided $6 million to GSA for projects related to safety enforcement activities. The program has broad eligibility and therefore funded a wide variety of projects. This report presents the history and results of the program.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and US Department of Transportation (US DOT) gathered input on ways to administer the NCPD/CBI program through a variety of means. These included public meetings,Federal Registernotices, program workshops, post-award briefings and on-going site visits. As a result of public meetings held before the first awards, the FHWA and the US DOT decided not to administratively separate the programs. This report therefore refers to the two programs as one since they are administered as one.

Congress did not require an evaluation of the program. In addition, its statutory language does not include any provision for use of program funds on an evaluation or on any other aspect of program administration. The FHWA, however, developed this report to present a summary of the program: its history, how it was used and administered, feedback, noteworthy successes and program trends.

The genesis of the NCPD/CBI program is in the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA). Section 1105 of the ISTEA defined 21 high priority corridors and provided both earmarked and discretionary funding for corridor programs. Sections 1089 and 6015 of the ISTEA required reports on border related issues. Subsequent law further defined some of the original corridors and added additional corridors. In 1997, the US DOT proposed a border program and some corridor planning for subsequent reauthorization. The eventual corridor and border related provisions enacted by Congress became Sections 1118 and 1119 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21stCentury (TEA-21), which defined two programs funded by a single funding source and administered as one.

In the five years of the program, 423 awards were made totaling $1,101,461,627 (some of these were suballocated). Total awards for the five fiscal years (1999 - 2003) were:

FY 1999

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002

FY 2003

$123,603,000

$121,796,751

$123,081,300

$477,980,576

$255,000,000

The award totals for FY 2002 and FY 2003 exceed TEA-21 authorizations because Congress, within the two Appropriation Acts, directed other funds to the NCPD/CBI program. This action was, in FY 2002, based on authority within section 1105 (Revenue Aligned Budget Authority, a.k.a. RABA) and in FY 2003 directed funds that would have been available under sections 1501-1511 (Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation a.k.a., TIFIA).

Throughout the program the requests exceeded awards by a substantial amount.

 

FY 1999

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002

FY 2003

Awarded

$123,603,000

$121,796,751

$123,081,300

$477,980,576

$255,000,000

Requested

$2 billion

$ 2 billion

$ 2 billion

$ 3 billion

NA

This inevitably led to many disappointed applicants (the requests for FY 2002 were actually "intention to request" and in FY 2003 neither requests nor "intention to request" was solicited).

Over the years, there was an obvious trend from awards based on US DOT selection toward awards based completely on Congressional designation. In FY 1999, the US DOT made all award selections. In FY 2000, Congressional designation began and increased in FY 2001. In FY 2002 and FY 2003 all awards were based on Congressional designation.

 

FY 1999

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002

FY 2003

Discretionary

$123 million

$ 62 million

$ 42 million

none

None

Designated

None

$ 60 million

$ 81 million

$478 million

$255 million

In FY 2000, some projects described by Congress left some limited discretion to the US DOT. These are counted as "designated" in the above table.

Another dramatic trend was the decreasing amount of the awards eligible under the CBI criteria (i.e., near the Canada or Mexico border) from about 50% in FY 1999 to about 5% in FY 2003.

 

FY 1999

FY 2000

FY 2001

FY 2002

FY 2003

NCPD eligibility

$ 61 million

$ 65 million

$ 93 million

$430 million

$242 million

CBI eligibility

$ 62 million

$ 56 million

$ 30 million

$ 47 million

$13 million

Some awards were for projects where some elements of the project were eligible for CBI funding and some elements were only eligible for NCPD funding. These are counted as CBI eligibility in the above table.

Other findings and trends over the years of the program include:

Finally, there are several noteworthy successes among the projects awarded funds that were completed. These are: World Trade Bridge in Texas , Commercial Vehicle Processing Center in New York , Freight Action Strategies Corridor (FAST) in Washington , and Alameda Corridor East (ACE) in California.

Updated: 12/03/2012
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