Skip to content U.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway AdministrationU.S. Department of Transportation/Federal Highway Administration

Office of Planning, Environment, & Realty (HEP)
Planning · Environment · Real Estate

HEP Events Guidance Publications Glossary Awards Contacts

FHWA National Gateway and Corridor Concepts

Table Of Contents

  1. 1.0 Introduction
    1. 1.1 Study Overview
    2. 1.2 Summary of Gateway and Corridor Flows
    3. 1.3 NAFTA Trade
    4. 1.4 Study Approach
    5. 1.5 Report Organization
  2. 2.0 International Gateway and Corridor Plans
    1. 2.1 Canada
    2. 2.2 Mexico – Multimodal Corridor Master Plan
    3. 2.3 European Union – The Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T)
    4. 2.4 People’s Republic of China
    5. 2.5 India’s Trade Corridor Development
    6. 2.6 Brazil
    7. 2.7 Considerations for U.S. Gateway and Planning Efforts
  3. 3.0 Role of Gateways and Corridors
    1. 3.1 Agriculture
    2. 3.2 Energy Supply Chains
    3. 3.3 Containerized Consumer Goods
    4. 3.4 Automotive Manufacturing
    5. 3.5 Considerations for a National Gateway and Corridor Concept
  4. 4.0 Private Sector Input and Observations with Public Sector Reflection
    1. 4.1 Approach to Private Sector Input
    2. 4.2 Overview of Private-Sector Forums
    3. 4.3 Private-Sector Input
    4. 4.4 Summary of Private Sector Input
    5. 4.5 Public Sector reaction to provate Sector Input
  5. 5.0 Conclusion
    1. 5.1 Summary of Knowledge Gained and Key Take-A-Ways
  6. Appendix A. Factors Impacting Future Freight Flows

List of Tables

Table 1.1 U.S. Export and Import Values and GDP Share 1992 to 2012, Billions of Dollars

Table 1.2 Top 15 U.S. Trading Partners by Total Trade Value 2012, Billions of Dollars

Table 1.3 Top 25 Trade Gateways by Mode and Value 2011, Billions of Dollars

Table 1.4 Top 10 Exporting States Key Commodities by Value 2012, Millions of Dollars

Table 1.5 Top Importing States Key Commodities by Value 2012, Millions of Dollars

Table 1.6 Top 10 Exporting States to Canada and Their Top Commodities 2012, Billions of Dollars

Table 1.7 Top 10 Importing States from Canada and Their Top Commodities 2012, Billion Dollars

Table 1.8 Top 10 Exporting States to Mexico and Their Top Commodities 2012, Billions Dollars

Table 1.9 Top 10 Importing States from Mexico and Their Top Commodities 2012, Billion Dollars

Table 1.10 Top 15 NAFTA Ports, by Value in Million Dollars 2012, Billions of Dollars

Table 2.1 Traffic Construction Measures in the 12th Five-Year Plan, 2011

Table 2.2 2005 Port Traffic in India

Table 2.3 Brazil: Overseas Waterborne Trade By Trade Area Metric Tons, 2011

Table 2.4 Liner Shipping Connectivity Index, 2004 to 2013

Table 3.1 Typical Harvest Periods for Agriculture Products in the Eastern Corn Belt

Table 3.2 Transportation Characteristics of Agricultural Commodities, 2007

Table 3.3 Modal Characteristic of Agricultural Commodities by Tons, 2007.

Table 3.4 National Ton-Mile Totals for Major Energy Commodities

Table 3.5 Modal Distribution of SCTG Commodity Code 43 “Mixed Freight”

Table 3.6 Containerized Value of Maritime Imports by Commodity, 2012

Table 3.7 U.S. Automotive Trade, 2011

Table 4.1 Businesses and Organizations Represented at the Outreach Events

Table 4.2 Summary of Attributes for the Alternative Futures Used to Access Future Freight Flows

Table 4.3 Private-Sector Input on Criteria for Prioritizing National Gateways and Corridor Priorities

Table 4.4 Forum Participants Suggested Considerations for National Gateways and Corridors

Table A.1 Summary of Driving Forces Impacting Future Freight Flows in the U.S.

List of Figures

Figure 1.1 Growth Trends of Exports, Imports and GDP 1992 to 2012

Figure 1.2 Modal Shares of Exports and Imports by Weight and Value, 2011

Figure 1.3 Domestic Modes of Transport for Export, Import and Domestic Goods Movement 2011, Thousands of Tons

Figure 1.4 Top 25 Foreign-Trade Freight Gateways by Value 2010

Figure 1.5 Import/Export Trade in Million Dollars by State 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.6 Export Values by Mode 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.7 Import Values by Mode 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.8 Values of Export to Canada by Truck and Rail 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.9 Values of Import from Canada by Truck and Rail 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.10 Values of Export to Mexico by Truck and Rail 2012, Billions of Dollars

Figure 1.11 Values of Import from Mexico by Truck and Rail 2012, Billion Dollars

Figure 1.12 Port Trade Values by Mode along Western U.S.-Canada Border 2012

Figure 1.13 Port Trade Values by Mode along Eastern U.S.-Canada Border 2012

Figure 1.14 Port Trade Values by Mode along U.S.-Mexico Border 2012

Figure 2.1 The Five Policy Lenses of the National Gateway Framework

Figure 2.2 Relationship between Canada’s Gateway Initiatives

Figure 2.3 Pacific Gateway Investment Map

Figure 2.4 Governance Structure of the Atlantic Gateway Strategy

Figure 2.5 Continental Gateway Governance Structure

Figure 2.6 Continental Gateway Strategy Analytical Framework

Figure 2.7 Identified Corridors for the MCMP

Figure 2.8 EU Core Network for 2030

Figure 2.9 Chinese Governmental Decision-making Structure

Figure 2.10 Container Port Traffic in Brazil, TEUs

Figure 3.1 U.S. Agriculture Supply Chain for Raw and Processed Products

Figure 3.2 Agriculture and Total Freight Moving on U.S. Interstate System 2002

Figure 3.3 Agriculture and Total Freight Moving on U.S. Rail Lines 2006

Figure 3.4 UP Railroad Export Grain Flows

Figure 3.5 Agriculture and Total Freight Moving on U.S. Waterways

Figure 3.6 Corn Surplus/Deficit Map ;with the Transportation Systems

Figure 3.7 Average Rail Transport Cost of Coal to the Power Sector by Major Coal Basin

Figure 3.8 U.S. Coal Exports By State

Figure 3.9 Current and Prospective Shale Gas and Shale Oil Developments

Figure 3.10 U.S. Natural Gas Imports

Figure 3.11 U.S. Wind Resources Map

Figure 3.12 Share of Consumer Expenditures by Expenditure Type

Figure 3.13 Linkage between Automotive Manufacturing Supply Chain Components

Figure 3.14 Automobile Industry Value Chain

Figure 3.15 North American Major Auto Assembly and Parts Manufacturing Facilities

Figure 3.16 Major Truck Routes on the National Highway System 2007

Figure 3.17 Norfolk Southern Railway Company’s System with Automotive Vehicle Distribution Facilities

Figure 3.18 Union Pacific Railroad’s Auto Parts Network

Figure 4.1 Private-Sector Input on National Infrastructure Needs under Naftatisque! Scenario

Figure 4.2 Private-Sector Input on National Infrastructure Needs under the One World Order Scenario

Figure 4.3 Private-Sector Input on National Infrastructure Needs under the Global Marketplace Scenario

Figure 4.4 Private Sector Input on National Infrastructure Needs in the Millions of Markets Scenario

Figure 4.5 Summary of Private Sector Input on Prioritization Criteria for National Gateway and Corridor Investments

Figure 4.6 Summary of Private Sector Scenario Planning Input

Figure 4.7 Summary of Cross Scenario Comparison

Figure 5.1 Summary of Private Sector Scenario Planning Input

Foreword

Notice

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the use of the information contained in this document. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation. The U.S. Government does not endorse products or manufacturers. Trademarks or manufacturers’ names may appear in this report only because they are considered essential to the objective of the document.

Quality Assurance Statement

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) provides high-quality information to serve Government, industry, and the public in a manner that promotes public understanding. Standards and policies are used to ensure and maximize the quality, objectivity, utility, and integrity of its information. FHWA periodically reviews quality issues and adjusts its programs and processes for continuous quality improvement.

Technical Report Documentation Page

1. Report No.

FHWA-HEP-14-007

2. Government Accession No.

3. Recipient’s Catalog No.

4. Title and Subtitle

FHWA National Gateways and Corridor Concepts

5. Report Date

August 2013

6. Performing Organization Code

7. Author(s)

Paula Dowell, Ph.D.; Juan Carlos Villa, Ph.D.; Nathan Hutson

8. Performing Organization Report No.

9. Performing Organization Name and Address

Cambridge Systematics, Inc.
4800 Hampden Lane, Suite 800
Bethesda, MD 20814

with
Texas A&M Transportation Institute

10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)

11. Contract or Grant No.

12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address

Federal Highway Administration
Office of Planning, Environment, and Realty
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590

13. Type of Report and Period Covered

Final Report
August 2011 to August 2013

14. Sponsoring Agency Code

HEPP

15. Supplementary Notes

16. Abstract

Freight corridors and gateways are key elements of the transportation network, and thus investment in them is critical to maintain economic competiveness. To make sure our future needs are met while ensuring economic competitiveness, there is a need for the United States and its North American partners to identify proactively where new infrastructure should be built to handle changes in trade patterns, demographics and freight flows with a focus on the role of transportation infrastructure in facilitating exports. Thus, the focus of the National Gateways and Corridors Concepts project is to identify and document multimodal corridor and gateway needs, trends, and opportunities to assist in the development of future national infrastructure plans that will assure U.S. and North American competiveness.

17. Key Words

Borders, Corridors, Gateways, Freight transportation, Freight infrastructure

18. Distribution Statement

No restrictions.

19. Security Classif. (of this report)

Unclassified

20. Security Classif. (of this page)

Unclassified

21. No of Pages

154

22. Price

N/A

Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed pages authorized

Metric Conversion Factors
(International System of Units)

APPROXIMATE CONVERSIONS TO SI UNITS
SYMBOL WHEN YOU KNOW MULTIPLY BY TO FIND SYMBOL
LENGTH
in inches 25.4 millimeters mm
ft feet 0.305 meters m
yd yards 0.914 meters m
mi miles 1.61 kilometers km
AREA
in2 square inches 645.2 square millimeters mm2
ft2 square feet 0.093 square meters m2
yd2 square yard 0.836 square meters m2
ac acres 0.405 hectares ha
mi2 square miles 2.59 square kilometers km2
VOLUME
fl oz fluid ounces 29.57 milliliters mL
gal gallons 3.785 liters L
ft3 cubic feet 0.028 cubic meters m3
yd3 cubic yards 0.765 cubic meters m3
NOTE: volumes greater than 1000 L shall be shown in m3
MASS
oz ounces 28.35 grams g
lb pounds 0.454 kilograms kg
T short tons (2000 lb) 0.907 megagrams (or "metric ton") Mg (or"t")
TEMPERATURE (exact degrees)
oF Fahrenheit 5 (F-32)/9 or (F-32)/1.8 Celsius oC
ILLUMINATION
fc foot-candles 10.76 lux lx
fl foot-Lamberts 3.426 candela/m2 cd/m2
FORCE and PRESSURE or STRESS
lbf poundforce 4.45 newtons N
lbf/in2 poundforce per square inch 6.89 kilopascals kPa
APPROXIMATE CONVERSIONS FROM SI UNITS
SYMBOL WHEN YOU KNOW MULTIPLY BY TO FIND SYMBOL
LENGTH
mm millimeters 0.039 inches in
m meters 3.28 feet ft
m meters 1.09 yards yd
km kilometers 0.621 miles mi
AREA
mm2 square millimeters 0.0016 square inches in2
m2 square meters 10.764 square feet ft2
m2 square meters 1.195 square yards yd2
ha hectares 2.47 acres ac
km2 square kilometers 0.386 square miles mi2
VOLUME
mL milliliters 0.034 fluid ounces fl oz
L liters 0.264 gallons gal
m3 cubic meters 35.314 cubic feet ft3
m3 cubic meters 1.307 cubic yards yd3
MASS
g grams 0.035 ounces oz
kg kilograms 2.202 pounds lb
Mg(or "t") megagrams (or "metric ton") 1.103 short tons (2000 lb) T
TEMPERATURE (exact degrees)
oC Celsius 1.8C+32 Fahrenheit oF
ILLUMINATION
lx lux 0.0929 foot-candles fc
cd/m2 candela/m2 0.2919 foot-Lamberts fl
FORCE and PRESSURE or STRESS
N newtons 0.225 poundforce lbf
kPa kilopascals 0.145 poundforce per square inch lbf/in2
Updated: 06/13/2014
HEP Home Planning Environment Real Estate
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000