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Population Dynamics

Population Dynamics

Access to Community Resources for the Elderly: Illustration Based on Transportation Network Analysis

Authors: Pulugurtha, Srinivas Subrahmanyam; Krishnakumar, Vanjeeswaran; Hirshorn, Barbara; Stewart, John Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 85th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

This paper discusses the need for, and the illustration of, a methodology for accessing community-based resources by older resident populations. The methodology involves: (1) identifying census blocks groups with older populations that can be characterized as at "high -risk" and "moderate -risk" for vulnerability in a community setting; (2) geocoding locations of community-based resources (e.g. health and social services, law enforcement and emergency services, and local government offices); (3) conducting a transportation network analysis; and (4) identifying the best travel path for older residents to access various needed community resources. "High -risk" and "moderate -risk" census blocks groups are identified as a function of the older population below the poverty threshold, the elderly population with one or more disabilities, and the older population living alone in the census block group. Network analysis tools in standard Geographic Information System (GIS) software are used to identify the best travel path to access community resources from "high -risk" and "moderate -risk" census block groups. The best travel path is identified based on travel distance, travel time, traffic volumes, number of intersections along the path, and the number of crashes involving older residents. The methodology is illustrated using data from a project that used GIS methods to indicate the physical relationship of older sub-populations on the "east-side" valley of the Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area to needed community resources.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Operations and Traffic Management; Planning and Forecasting; Security and Emergencies; Society; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Access; Aged; Community action programs; Emergency transportation; Geographic information systems; Law enforcement; Network analysis (Planning); Population; Resource development and utilization; Retirement; Las Vegas Metropolitan Area

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=1121

Population Dynamics

Demographics Matter: Travel Demand, Options, and Characteristics Among Minority Populations

Authors: Contrino, Heather; McGuckin, Nancy

Public Works Management & Policy

Publication Date: Apr 2009

Abstract:

Race and ethnicity are important in terms of travel choices, needs, and options. Many factors contribute to the differences in patterns of travel within population segments. This paper uses data from the US Census Bureau and the National Household Travel Survey Program to examine the demographic characteristics of minority populations and the resulting differences in their travel behavior. As the U.S. society becomes more diverse over the next few decades, a significant portion of growth in travel demand will come from minority populations. Minorities on average are more transit dependent, have higher automobile occupancies, and have lower levels of vehicle ownership. Factors such as these should be considered when forecasting travel demand and developing policy and planning initiatives.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Demographics; Ethnic groups; Forecasting; Minorities; Race; Transportation planning; Transportation policy; Travel behavior; Travel demand

Availability: Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/oclc/34383369

Population Dynamics

Does Proximity to Activity-Inducing Facilities Explain Lower Participation in Physical Activity by Low-Income and Minority Populations?

Authors: Deka, Devajyoti; Connelly, Mary Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 90th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2011

Abstract:

Like the rest of the nation, low-income and minority populations in New Jersey have a higher rate of obesity and a lower rate of participation in physical activity. This study examines if lower proximity to activity-inducing infrastructure and facilities, including bicycling routes and gymnasiums, could be a reason for their lower participation in physical activity. Past studies have shown that proximity to activity-inducing facilities is generally associated with greater participation in physical activity for the general population. Unfortunately, some studies have found that low-income and minority populations have lower proximity to such facilities. Other studies have indicated that proximity to facilities may not influence their participation in physical activity to the same extent as the general population. This study makes a statewide assessment of proximity to existing fitness facilities, existing bicycling facilities, and programmed bicycling/pedestrian projects in New Jersey. To examine if proximity to activity-inducing facilities is lower for the low-income and minority populations, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used. Analysis was carried out at the level of census block group and municipality. The results provide no evidence that low-income and minority populations have lower proximity to activity-inducing facilities. The analysis also shows that programmed bicycling/pedestrian projects are favorably located for these populations. The study concludes that the lower participation of low-income and minority populations in New Jersey must be explained by behavioral factors rather than proximity to facilities.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Pedestrians and Bicyclists; Safety and Human Factors; I71: Traffic Theory

Activity centers; Behavior; Bicycle facilities; Low income groups; Minorities; Obesity; Physical fitness; Recreational facilities; Socioeconomic factors; Trip length; New Jersey; Proximity

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Evaluating The Environmental Justice Impacts of Transportation Improvement Projects in the US

Authors: Chakraborty, Jayajit

Transportation Research Part D: Transport and Environment

Publication Date: Sep 2006

Abstract:

This paper considers the environmental justice implications of transportation plans and policies in the US. Despite several administrative orders and federal mandates, few specific guidelines exist for assessing the disproportionate effects of transportation projects and implementing environmental justice principles in the transportation planning process. The paper develops a set of indices to measure the environmental justice impacts of transportation projects; and applies these to evaluate proposed capacity improvement projects in Volusia County, Florida. The indices developed serve as preliminary indicators that address the key research dimensions of environmental justice, meet the requirements of federal mandates that enforce principles of environmental justice, and are formulated on the basis of census data and tools available in geographic information systems software.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Data and Information Technology; Energy; Environment; Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Policy; Society; I15: Environment; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Case studies; Census; Environmental justice; Evaluation; Federal laws; Geographic information systems; Transportation planning; Transportation policy; Volusia County (Florida); Capacity improvement

Availability: Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/issn/13619209

Population Dynamics

Immigrants and Resource Sharing: The Case of Carpooling

Authors: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Shiki, Kimiko Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 87th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2008

Abstract:

Immigration has altered the demographic composition of California where the foreign-born population now comprises more than one-quarter of the population. Despite this staggering figure, surprisingly little academic scholarship has focused on the travel patterns and behavior of immigrants. Existing studies on this population group have largely centered on their use of public transit, yet most immigrants travel by automobile. In this study, we use data from the 2000 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) of the U.S. Census and multinomial logistic models to examine the carpooling behavior of foreign-born workers in California relative to solo driving, public transit, and walking. The models focus on the effect of nativity, length of residency, and race and ethnicity on mode choice. The findings show that with time in the U.S. immigrants tend to assimilate away from alternative modes of transportation (carpool, public transit, and walking) toward solo driving. Despite this trend, the odds of carpooling for Asian and Hispanic immigrants remain high even after many years in the U.S. These findings help us to better understand the prevalence and role of resource sharing among immigrant households. Further, they will aid transportation planners in planning for the transportation needs of this growing population group.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Freight Transportation; Highways; Pedestrians and Bicyclists; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society; I10: Economics and Administration; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Asians; Automobiles; Behavior; Carpools; Demographics; Hispanics; Logistics; Mode choice; Persons by race and ethnicity; Public transit; Social factors; Travel demand; Travel patterns; Walking; California; Immigrants; Public Use Microdata Sample; U.S. Bur

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Immigration, Residential Location, Car Ownership, and Commuting Behavior: Multivariate Latent Class Analysis from California

Authors: Beckman, Jarad David; Goulias, Konstadinos G Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 87th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2008

Abstract:

Utilizing a latent class cluster analysis, this paper investigates spatial and social and economic determinants of the joint distribution among travel time, mode choice, and departure time for work using the 2000 Census long form data. Through a latent tree structure analysis, age, residential location, immigration stage, gender, personal income, and race are found to be the primary determinants in the workplace commute decision-making process. By defining several relatively homogeneous population segments, the likelihood of falling into each segment is found to differ across age groups and geography, with different indicators affecting each group differentially. This analysis complements past studies that used regression models to investigate socio-demographic indicators and their impact on travel behavior in two distinct ways: a) analyses is done by considering travel time, mode choice, and departure time for work simultaneously, and b) heterogeneity in behavior is accounted for using methods that identify different groups of behavior and then their determinants. Conclusively the method here is richer than many other methods used to study the ethnically diverse population of California and shows the addition of geographic location and latent segment identification to greatly improve our understanding of specific behaviors.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Geotechnology; Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Safety and Human Factors; Society; I10: Economics and Administration; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Behavior; Cluster analysis; Commuting; Departure time; Gender; Geography; Mode choice; Socioeconomic areas; Travel time; Workplaces; California; Immigrants

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Is Shorter Still Better? Updated Analysis of Gender, Race, and Industrial Segregation in San Francisco Bay Area Commuting Patterns

Authors: Weinberger, Rachel R Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 85th Annual Meeting, 2006

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

In 1998, Chapple and Weinberger found that neither human capital nor labor market segmentation theories explain why women's journey to work travel times are typically shorter than men's. This paper updates the 1998 paper, adding analysis based on the 2000 PUMS data for the San Francisco Bay Area. Analysis of the 1980, 1990 and 2000 census data offer insights but show that neither theory satisfactorily explains the differences in male and female commute times. Findings include that in the study area both men and women who live in urban areas tend to have shorter commute times than their suburban counterparts; that gendered differences disappear for urban dwellers even while they persist between men and women controlling for many other socio-demographic characteristics; and that black men and women have disproportionately long commutes even when controlling for income and mode. Understanding the trend in travel time differences gives greater insight into questions of mobility and accessibility when we consider questions of transportation/land use interactions and transportation supply. Coupling this with our increased understanding of job opportunity distribution will aid our ability to make policy decisions that are both equitable and efficient.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society; I10: Economics and Administration

Accessibility; Blacks; Commuting; Females; Gender; Income; Industrial areas; Jobs; Males; Mobility; Opportunity models; Race; Suburbs; Transportation modes; Travel patterns; Travel time; Trend (Statistics); Urban areas; Work trips; San Francisco Bay Area

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=1121

Population Dynamics

Older Driver Safety: Attitudes and Beliefs

Authors: White, Marie; McKay, Mary Pat; Shaffer, Alison Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine-P.O. Box 4176 Barrington, IL 60011-4176

Annals of Advances in Automotive Medicine

Publication Date: Oct 2009

Abstract:

This paper describes how America is graying. The United States (U.S.) Census projections estimate of the population 65 years and older will more than double between the 2000 census and 2030. With 6,738 fatalities in 2006, motor vehicle crashes are the second leading cause of injury-related death in this age group. In 2003, the 28.6 million licensed drivers over 65 comprised 14.6 percent of all drivers. By 2030, there will be more than 57 million older drivers who will encompass more than 20 percent of all drivers. As drivers age over 65, their risk of being involved in a fatal crash increases, partly because this age group is more vulnerable to crash forces and resulting injuries due to increased fragility. The choice to alter driving behavior or to stop driving altogether appears to be highly personal and multi-factorial, including concerns about independence, driver confidence, ease of access to alternative methods of transportation, and family influences. As relicensing regulations vary from state to state, it is important to understand individual reasons impacting the decision to drive as well as society's level of risk tolerance. The objectives of this paper were to: (1) assess the waiting area of a geriatrics clinic as location to study older drivers and their families; (2) identify barriers to family involvement in addressing older driver safety; (3) understand attitudes towards licensure and retesting; and (4) describe concerns around alternate transportation systems.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Safety and Human Factors; Society; I83: Accidents and the Human Factor

Accident risk forecasting; Aged drivers; Attitudes; Driver licensing; Fatalities; Human factors in accidents; Risk analysis; Social factors; Traffic accidents

Availability: Association for the Advancement of Automotive Medicine; Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/issn/19432461

Population Dynamics

Planning for Demographic Diversity: The Case of Immigrants and Public Transit

Authors: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Evans, Alexandra Elizabeth

Journal of Public Transportation

Publication Date: 2010

Abstract:

This research examines the significant effects of immigration on transit use. Drawing on data from the U.S. Census, we examine how the enormous influx of immigrants to California has altered the demographics of transit commuting in the state and contributed importantly to a growth in transit ridership. California immigrants commute by public transit at twice the rate of native-born commuters, comprise nearly 50 percent of all transit commuters in the state, and are responsible for much of the growth in transit commuting in the state. But over time, immigrants' reliance on transit declines. Transit managers would be well advised to plan for these inevitable demographic changes by enhancing transit services in neighborhoods that serve as ports to entry for new immigrants, those most likely to rely on public transportation.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Public Transportation; Society

Commuters; Commuting; Demographics; Ethnic groups; Public transit; Ridership; California; Immigrants; Immigration; Social norms

Availability: Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/oclc/30755822

Population Dynamics

Policy of Enforcement: Red Light Cameras and Racial Profiling

Authors: Eger III, Robert J; Fortner, C Kevin; Slade, Catherine P Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 86th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2007

Abstract:

The use of red light cameras has focused on traffic safety issues with well established results. In this paper we explore the potential public policy benefits of red light cameras as tools to assess information relating to racial profiling. Specifically, we explore the question of whether or not some of the often conflicting rhetoric about racial profiling and gaps in the literature concerning the prevalence of racial profiling can be cleared up using red light camera observations to measure racial disparities in traffic violations. Using data from cameras at intersections matched to census data, we find that although citations from the red light cameras are issued to a disproportionate number of minorities based on the racial composition of the population surrounding the location of the infraction, the racial composition of the violators is consistent with the racial composition of the block group in which they reside. This confirms those studies of racial profiling that show the fallacy of measuring racial disparities of persons stopped, cited, or arrested for traffic violations based on location of the violation. Instead, we propose that racial profiling in traffic stops is not occurring if the distribution of violators cited by a red light camera is consistent with the distribution of violators cited by law enforcement officers. Using the red light camera violation information and census data, this study finds no evidence of differential behavior in red-light running based on race and evidence of a decrease in red-light running behavior for low-income groups. Our study indicates that red light cameras may have a present and future role in assisting public policy makers on issues of racial profiling thresholds.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Data and Information Technology; Economics; Highways; Society; I10: Economics and Administration

Demographics; Digital cameras; Race; Red light running; Regression analysis; Socioeconomic factors; Statistical analysis; Traffic law enforcement; Racial profiling

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://gulliver.trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7286

Population Dynamics

Spatial Decision Support System for Low-Income Families: Relocation Tool for the Chicago, Illinois, Region

Authors: Sriraj, P S; Minor, Mark; Thakuriah, Piyushimita

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

Housing relocation or housing mobility is not uncommon in the United States, with the average family relocating once every 6 years. As part of this process, individuals and families take into account a variety of factors. One of the important factors is that of transportation and its availability. Various researchers have studied the impact of transportation information on relocation choice. However, the need for a structured methodology that incorporates various factors, such as transportation, has been highlighted from a study of the current practice of relocation counseling. The objectives of this paper are threefold: (a) to develop an analytical hierarchy process to rank census tracts for relocation purposes of individuals, (b) to present a prototype of the spatial decision support system (SDSS) with an example, and (c) to evaluate the impact of relocation choice of individuals by using a spatially unconstrained approach. With data from the six-county northeastern Illinois region, the SDSS is developed and showcased with the help of a sample application. Two scenarios are tested for each respondent. The first is based on only housing criteria, and the second compares all criteria in the analytical hierarchy process matrix with each other. The improvements in travel time determined from the results of the two scenarios are compared, and the results are discussed to highlight the salient features of the decision support system.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Society; Transportation (General); I10: Economics and Administration

Decision support systems; Families; Jobs; Low income groups; Transportation; Travel time; Chicago (Illinois); Northeastern Illinois; Access to jobs; Affordable housing; Family relocation; Relocation

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://www.trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7207

Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/030909965X

Population Dynamics

Transportation Assimilation: Immigrants, Race and Ethnicity, and Mode Choice

Authors: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Shiki, Kimiko Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 86th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2007

Abstract:

Immigration has altered the demographic composition of California where the foreign-born population now comprises more than one-quarter of the population. Despite this staggering figure, surprisingly little academic scholarship has focused on the travel patterns and behavior of immigrants. In this study, we use data from the 2000 Public Use Microdata Sample (PUMS) of the U.S. Census to examine the commute mode choice of California's foreign-born population and, more specifically, the relationship between length of residency in the U.S. and transit usage rates, controlling for other factors likely to influence mode choice. We find that recent immigrants "regardless of race or ethnicity" are significantly more likely to commute by transit than native-born adults. After the first five years in the U.S., assimilation to automobile use occurs across all immigrant groups; however, the rate of assimilation varies significantly by racial and ethnic group even controlling for income. Asian immigrants rapidly move to automobile use while Hispanic immigrants remain more likely to use transit than native-born commuters even after 20 years in the U.S. The findings from this study suggest that factors in addition to income and residential location "such as cultural differences" affect commute mode choice. Further, since assimilation to automobile use occurs across all immigrant groups, without a steady stream of new immigrants as well as policy changes to either slow the assimilation process or attract new riders, transit ridership in California likely will decline.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society

Demographics; Ethnic groups; Hispanics; Mode choice; Persons by race and ethnicity; Transportation planning; Travel patterns; California; Immigrants; Ethnicity; Inequality (Ethnic groups); Sociodemographics

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://gulliver.trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7286

Population Dynamics

Transportation Barriers and Travel Mode Preferences of Mexican Immigrants In California

Authors: Donahue, Moira; Rodier, Caroline J Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 87th Annual Meeting, 2008

Publication Date: 2008

Abstract:

In 2000, more than a quarter of California's Mexican immigrants lived in poverty, and a little more than half of Mexican-immigrant adults had access to a car for travel to work. Despite their large population share and propensity to use public transit, there is a dearth of research specific to Mexican-immigrant travel as well as for immigrant travel in general. To provide insights into this area, we present the results of interviews with representatives from community-based organizations throughout the state of California that serve large Mexican-immigrant communities. We investigated transportation use, common destinations, travel needs, travel mode preferences, and travel mode challenges. From our findings, common destinations of Mexican immigrants included workplaces, grocery stores, health care facilities, social service agencies, schools, and recreation sites. Cars and carpools were described as the primary modes of travel; in some areas with high quality transit service, transit also was described as a primary mode. Inaccessible destinations were associated with one's access to transportation; pursuing job opportunities, access to health care, making grocery store trips, and isolation in rural areas were reoccurring themes. The car was described as the most preferred mode, yet it was made evident that transit is often preferable to driving when it is accessible. Car travel barriers included lack of drivers' licenses and costs of car ownership. Transit barriers included access issues in rural areas, limited service hours for commute needs, possible encounters with Immigration officials, and fear of crime and discrimination. Bicycle and pedestrian travel were described as modes of last resort.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Highways; Operations and Traffic Management; Pedestrians and Bicyclists; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society; I10: Economics and Administration; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Automobiles; Behavior; Bicycle travel; Carpools; Commuting; Demographics; Ethnic groups; Mode choice; Origin and destination; Public transit; Rural areas; Social factors; Travel demand; Walking; California; Immigrants; Mexican Americans; U.S. Bureau of th

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Transportation Costs, Inequities, and Trade-Offs

Authors: Sanchez, Thomas W; Makarewicz, Carrie; Haas, Peter M; Dawkins, Casey J Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 86th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2007

Abstract:

Transportation costs are frequently identified as having socially inequitable effects, especially for low-income households who have limited financial resources. The concerns are that low-income persons spend a disproportionately larger proportion of their total income on transportation due to the fixed costs associated with financing automobile purchase. Furthermore, low income persons unable to purchase an automobile often reside in locations that are not well connected by public transit to employment concentrations. This study examines neighborhood housing and transportation choices available to working households in 28 metropolitan regions in the U.S. The study is unique because it analyzes household characteristics at the census travel level. We first describe the trends in transportation costs by household income levels. We then argue that based on microeconomic theory predicting trade-offs between housing and transportation costs (HT) as households choose residential locations, transportation cost burdens should not be considered separate from housing costs. In addition, we perform a cluster analysis to show that low income households are significantly burdened by the combination of housing and transportation costs and that these households and their neighborhoods potentially experience other social and economic burdens because of it.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Energy; Environment; Society; Transportation (General); I15: Environment

Alternatives analysis; Costs; Economic analysis; Economics; Fixed costs; Households; Income; Low income groups; Operating costs; Social factors; Transportation; Fuel costs; Inequality; Transportation costs

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://gulliver.trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7286

Population Dynamics

Transportation Network Analysis to Access Community Resources by Older Populations

Authors: Pulugurtha, Srinivas Subrahmanyam; Hirshorn, Barbara A; Krishnakumar, Vanjeeswaran K; Steward, John F American Society of Civil Engineers-1801 Alexander Bell Drive Reston, VA 20191-4400

Applications of Advanced Technology in Transportation. The Ninth International Conference, 2006

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

This paper discussed the need for, and illustration of, a methodology for accessing community-based resources by older resident populations. The methodology involves: (1) identifying census blocks groups with older, non-institutionalized populations that may be "at high-risk" or "at moderate risk" of a decreased ability to reside in a non-institutionalized community-based setting, (2) geocoding locations of community-based resources (e.g.) health and social services, law enforcement and emergency services, and local government offices) that are the key to the well being of older residents, (3) conducting a transportation network analysis, and (4) identifying the best travel path for older residents to access various needed community-based resources. "At high-risk" and "at moderate-risk" census blocks groups are identified as a function of three demographic characteristics: (1) with income below the poverty threshold, (2) with one or more disabilities, and, given these two factors, and (3) living alone. Network analysis tools in standard geographic information system (GIS) software are used to identify the best travel path to access community resources from "at high-risk" and "at moderate-risk" census block groups. The identified "best travel path" is based on travel distance, travel time, traffic volumes, number of intersections along the path, and the number of crashes involving older residents. The methodology is illustrated using data from a project that used GIS methods to indicate the physical relationship of older sub-populations to needed community resources in a section of the Las Vegas, Nevada metropolitan area.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Operations and Traffic Management; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Safety and Human Factors; Society; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Aged; Community action programs; Geographic information systems; High risk drivers; Intersections; Risk assessment; Traffic volume; Transportation disadvantaged persons; Travel; Travel behavior; Travel demand; Travel time; Las Vegas Metropolitan Area; Com

Availability: American Society of Civil Engineers; Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/0784407991

Population Dynamics

Travel Behavior of Immigrant Groups in California

Authors: Handy, Susan L; Blumenberg, Evelyn; Donahue, Moira; Lovejoy, Kristin; Shaheen, Susan A; Rodier, Caroline J; Shiki, Kimiko; Song, Lily; Tal, Gil

Intellimotion

Publication Date: 2008

Abstract:

This article describes a project which is examining the needs, constraints, attitudes and preferences influencing travel choices for immigrants in California. Three components of the research are related: 1) investigating commute travel of California immigrants using Census data; 2) examining transportation experiences and needs of Mexican immigrants using focus groups; and, 3) looking at transportation needs and recommendations of Mexican immigrants through interview with community-based organization. Key findings from the study look at travel and commute mode trends involving automobiles, public transit, carpooling, and walking/biking. Land use issues are also briefly discussed. The article concludes with a look at two strategies for improving the degree to which the needs of California's immigrants are met. The first strategy is directed at making car travel more attainable, while the second is focused on enhancing the quality of transit service.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Highways; Passenger Transportation; Public Transportation; Society; I10: Economics and Administration

Commuters; Commuting; Mode choice; Travel behavior; Travel by mode; Travel patterns; California; Immigrants

Availability: Available from UC Berkeley Transportation Library through interlibrary loan or document delivery

Order URL: http://library.its.berkeley.edu; Find a library where document is available

Order URL: http://worldcat.org/oclc/24617439

Population Dynamics

Travel Behavior of Immigrants in California: Trends and Policy Implications

Authors: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Song, Lily Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 87th Annual Meeting, 2008

Publication Date: 2008

Abstract:

This article examines the travel behavior of immigrants in California. Drawing on data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 Public Use Microdata Sample of the U.S. Census, we describe immigrants' travel patterns in California, focusing on commute mode. We find that immigrants rely more extensively on alternative commute modes (carpooling and transit) than native-born commuters. But with time in the U.S., immigrants quickly assimilate away from these alternative modes and increasingly rely on solo driving. We then explore the effects of this transportation assimilation process for immigrant families and on public transit usage. Cars may provide immigrants with increased access to employment and, consequently, contribute to their economic assimilation. However, declining transit use among recent immigrants and slowing immigration suggest that, unless transit planners intervene, transit ridership in California will decline. We conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for transportation policy.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Economics; Highways; Planning and Forecasting; Public Transportation; Society; I10: Economics and Administration; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Automobiles; Carpools; Demographics; Mode choice; Persons by race and ethnicity; Public transit; Social factors; Travel behavior; Travel demand; Travel patterns; California; Immigrants; Public Use Microdata Sample; Resource sharing

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Travel In the 'Hood: Ethnic Neighborhoods and Mode Choice

Authors: Blumenberg, Evelyn; Smart, Michael Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 88th Annual Meeting

Publication Date: 2009

Abstract:

Many urban planners promote mixed-use developments as one component of a broader sustainable development strategy. Scholars and advocates argue that these neighborhoods have the potential to reduce congestion by promoting fewer trips, shorter travel distances, and alternative modes of travel. With their mix of ethnic residents, businesses, services, and community institutions, ethnic enclaves share many of the characteristics of these mixed-use neighborhoods. We hypothesize, therefore, that residents living in these ethnic neighborhoods will exhibit different travel behavior than those living outside of ethnic neighborhoods. Drawing on data from the 2000 U.S. Census, we examine whether residents of ethnic neighborhoods are more likely to commute by carpool and public transit than other workers. We find a relationship between residential location in ethnic clusters and travel behavior. The findings provide insight into the relationship among social networks, land use, and travel behavior.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Safety and Human Factors; Society; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Carpools; City planning; Commuting; Ethnic groups; Land use; Mixed use development; Neighborhoods; Public transit; Residential areas; Traffic congestion; Travel behavior; Social media

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Trends in Minority Commuting Behavior: What Does the American Community Survey Tell Us?

Authors: Sööt, Siim; Berman, Joost Gideon Transportation Research Board-500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001

Transportation Research Board 85th Annual Meeting, 2006

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

Two currently important aspects of transportation research are addressed in this paper, the changing nature of travel behavior among the growing minority groups and the potential utility of the American Community Survey (ACS) as an emerging source of travel information. With minority groups growing in population (the Chicago metropolitan area is projected to be more than half ‘minority' by 2030), the commuting patterns and trends of this population need close examination. We find that, overall, minorities have higher travel times to work, but in suburban Chicago they have lower travel times. We now have sufficient data in the ACS to make this assessment and address some of the key questions regarding commuting behavior. We find that the ACS data for Illinois, from 2000 to 2003, reveals only a few short-term trends, such as growing minority populations and increasing tendency to drive to work, but that the travel times and mode use have not changed substantially throughout the study period, 2000-2003. These findings support the intent of the US Census Bureau to aggregate several years of data, at increased sample sizes, so that researchers and planners alike may study patterns and trend at small levels of geographic detail. At the same time, caution needs to be exercised in analyzing aggregate data for variables that exhibit change over time. The key here is the change over short periods of time, five years, rather than long-term changes that are common in travel behavior.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Operations and Traffic Management; Passenger Transportation; Planning and Forecasting; I21: Planning of Transport Infrastructure; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Commuters; Commuting; Data collection; Transportation planning; Travel behavior; Travel time; Chicago Metropolitan Area

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=1121

Population Dynamics

Understanding Carpool Use by Hispanics in Texas

Authors: Cline, Michael E; Sparks, Corey; Eschbach, Karl

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board

Publication Date: 2009

Abstract:

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board Issue: 2118

Subject Areas and Index Terms

The Hispanic population in Texas has increased numerically faster than any other racial or ethnic group in the past 2 decades. If these trends continue, Texas is likely to become a Hispanic majority state by 2040. Despite this change in the ethnic composi

Carpools; Culture (Social sciences); Ethnic groups; Hispanics; Occupations; Social factors; Socioeconomic factors; Travel behavior; Trend (Statistics); Texas; Immigrants

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Population Dynamics

Working Retirement: Travel Trends of the Aging Workforce

Authors: Srinivasan, Nanda; McGuckin, Nancy; Murakami, Elaine

Transportation Research Record: Journal of the Transportation Research Board

Publication Date: 2006

Abstract:

The proportion and number of older workers (those older than 65) are expected to increase significantly in the coming decades, and examining this cohort's travel behavior may provide insight into this potential boom. This study is an exploratory analysis to describe working patterns of the older population today, to examine their work trips, and to make some guesses about how the baby boom generation will be similar to or differ from today's older population. With the available literature on travel by the elderly and data from the 2000 U.S. decennial census and the 2001 National Household Travel Survey, the commute and occupational characteristics of older workers in the work force are explored. Topics covered include projected increase in miles driven by older population groups, trends in labor force participation, occupations of older workers, overall travel patterns, travel time, and mode-to-work characteristics; examination of race and ethnic origin of older workers; and description of the older work-at-home population.

Subject Areas and Index Terms

Highways; Planning and Forecasting; I72: Traffic and Transport Planning

Aged; Ethnic groups; Labor force; Mode choice; Occupations; Retirement; Telecommuting; Travel behavior; Travel patterns; Travel time; Trend (Statistics); Vehicle miles of travel; Work trips; 2000 Census; 2001 National Household Travel Survey

Availability: Transportation Research Board Business Office

Order URL: http://trb.org/news/blurb_detail.asp?id=7745

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Order URL: http://worldcat.org/isbn/0309099951

Updated: 06/06/2011
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