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U.S. Department of Transportation, Office of Public Affairs, Washington, D.C., www.dot.gov/affairs/briefing.htm - News

FHWA 34-11
Tuesday, July 26, 2011
Contact: Nancy Singer
Tel: 202-366-0660

FHWA Administrator Mendez Joins in Dedication of New Ninth Street Bridge Over New York Avenue

WASHINGTON - Federal Highway Administrator Victor Mendez joined District of Columbia Mayor Vincent Gray today in dedicating the new Ninth Street Bridge over New York Avenue. The new bridge will improve safety and mobility in Northeast D.C.

"The new Ninth Street Bridge will help the people who live here and those who come to visit get to their jobs, to their homes and to the wonderful sights the city has to offer," said U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood.

As the first bridge drivers cross when traveling from Maryland to the District of Columbia on New York Avenue, the Ninth Street Bridge is considered a gateway to the city. It is also an important connector within the nation's capital, serving residents and businesses located in the Trinidad, Ivy City and Brentwood neighborhoods.

"Shoring up our roads and bridges is essential to the nation's economic competitiveness," Administrator Mendez said. "The more we can improve our infrastructure, especially in busy metropolitan areas, the more we'll help move economic recovery along."

The new bridge handles about 25,000 vehicles each day, including 2,000 trucks. To improve safety, travel lanes were widened from 44 to 52 feet. In addition, sidewalks were widened from five to nine feet to better accommodate pedestrians and bicycles. A median strip separates traffic to further improve safety, and railings were crash-tested to minimize injury.

The new bridge replaces an antiquated and deteriorating structure built in 1941 and is designed to last 75 years. The structural upgrades to this bridge that crosses over Amtrak and CSX railroads include high-performance concrete and steel, which is durable and resistant to corrosion.

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