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Publication Number:      Date:  Spring 1994
Issue No: Vol. 57 No. 4
Date: Spring 1994

 

Articles

Texas High-Strength Concrete Bridge Project

by Mary Lou Ralls and Ramon Carrasquillo

High-strength concrete is one of the most significant new materials available to federal, state, and local highway agencies to rehabilitate the nation's crumbling infrastructure. High-strength concrete, as defined in this article, has a specified design strength of 55.2 megapascals (8,000 pounds per square inch) or greater.

The Impact of Highway Infrastructure on Economic Performance

by Theresa M. Smith

In the United States, the importance of transportation facilities to the nation's economic strength and efficiency is generally accepted. A fundamental requirement of manufacturers is to distribute their products to appropriate markets quickly and inexpensively; people must be able to get to work and to conduct business.

Automatic Weather Station Installed at Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center

by Aramis Lopez

In the United States, the importance of transportation facilities to the nation's economic strength and efficiency is generally accepted. A fundamental requirement of manufacturers is to distribute their products to appropriate markets quickly and inexpensively; people must be able to get to work and to conduct business.

An Automatic Warning System to Prevent Truck Rollover on Curved Ramps

by by Hugh W. McGee and Rodney R. Strickland

Truck accidents on urban freeways occur more frequently at interchanges -- particularly on curved exit ramps -- than at any other location. In fact, trucks overturning on exit ramps at interstate interchanges account for five out of every 100 fatal truck accidents.

FHWA Assistance to Russia

by Bert Schacknies

The United States government has been standing behind the reformist platform of the Russian government since August 1991. The U.S. Congress has provided the legislative authorization for the Department of State (DOS) and other government agencies to assist in the reform process in Russia. The "Freedom for Russia Act," which authorizes DOS to provide assistance to the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), also includes a provision to provide support for the CIS transport sector.

Using Finite Element Analysis in Designing Roadside Hardware

by Malcolm Ray

Over the past several decades, the finite element method has become a popular technique in civil engineering for predicting the response of structures and materials; however, until recently it was rarely used in the design of roadside hardware such as guardrails, bridge rails, and sign supports.

National Crash Analysis Center

by Azim Eskandarian, Nabih E. Bedewi, and Leonard Meczkowski

The National Crash Analysis Center (NCAC) is a research and resource center for transportation safety studies on vehicles and highways. NCAC was established at The George Washington (GW) University--Virginia Campus in Ashburn, Va., on Oct. 1, 1992, through a contract from the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) and contributions from GW's School of Engineering and Applied Science.

 

 

 

Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000
Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center | 6300 Georgetown Pike | McLean, VA | 22101