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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-072
Date: July 2006

Assessing Stream Channel Stability At Bridges in Physiographic Regions

 

APPENDIX A, continued.

Figure 51. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-downstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream under the bridge. The channel is completely dry and lacks definition.  Some channel mining is evident.

Figure 52. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge.

Figure 51. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-
downstream under bridge.

Figure 52. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 53. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Rio Puerco in the Trans Pecos region looking downstream from the bridge. The bed material is sand, and the bank vegetation is desert shrubs.

Figure 54. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The photo shows the vertical wall along left bank.

Figure 53. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 54. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 55. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The photo shows desert shrubs and sand in the bed in front of and under the bridge.

Figure 56. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-ooking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. Ripples in the fine sand can be seen.

Figure 55. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 56. Rio Puerco, Trans Pecos-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 57. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Rio San Jose in the Trans Pecos region looking upstream from the bridge. The bed material is sand, and the bank vegetation is desert shrubs. The photo shows a straightened, narrowed channel.

Figure 58. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Like figure 57, this photo shows a straightened, narrowed channel.

Figure 57. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 58. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 59. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The photo shows a nearly trapezoidal section under the bridge.

Figure 60. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. Like figure 59, this photo shows a nearly trapezoidal section under the bridge.

Figure 59. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 60. Rio San Jose, Trans Pecos-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 61. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is the Arkansas River in the southern Rocky Mountain region looking downstream at the bridge. The bed material is primarily gravel, and the bank vegetation is woody vegetation and annuals.

Figure 62. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The channel is relatively wide and shallow.

Figure 61. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 62. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 63. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge.

Figure 64. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-bridge number 2 downstream from other bridge. Photo. This is looking at a second bridge downstream from the study bridge.

Figure 63. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 64. Arkansas River, Rocky Mountains-
bridge #2 downstream from other bridge.

Figure 65. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Cochetopa River in the southern Rocky Mountain region looking downstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is primarily shrubs.

Figure 66. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge.

Figure 65. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 66. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 67. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The channel clearly has been straightened and bank vegetation removed. Bank stabilization has been added on the right bank.

Figure 68. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-upstream of bridge. Photo. This is North Rush Creek in the Great Plains region looking upstream of the bridge. The stream winds through the plains; the bank vegetation consists of grasses.

Figure 67. Cochetopa Creek, Rocky Mountains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 68. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-upstream of bridge.

Figure 69. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge.

Figure 70. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The photo shows high vertical bank walls on the left bank.

Figure 69. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 70. North Rush Creek, Great Plains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 71. Saline River, Great Plains-upstream under bridge. Photo. This is the Saline River in the Great Plains region looking upstream under the bridge. Bank vegetation is grass in the first river width, but thick and largely woody beyond that.

Figure 72. Saline River, Great Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge.

Figure 72. Saline River, Great Plains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 73. Saline River, Great Plains-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The arched bridge spans a large part of the flood plain.

Figure 71. Saline River,Great Plains-upstream under bridge.

Figure 73. Saline River, Great Plains-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 74. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-left bank. Photo. This is looking toward the left bank. The bridge has many spans to accommodate lateral movement and high water.

Figure 75. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-looking downstream at bridge, photo 1. Photo. This is the Solomon River in the Great Plains region looking downstream at the bridge. The bank vegetation consists of grasses and annuals, with woody vegetation several widths back from the banks.

Figure 74. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-
looking downstream at bridge, photo 1.

Figure 75. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-
looking downstream at bridge, photo 2.

Figure 76. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-looking downstream at bridge, photo 2. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The bridge spans a large part of the flood plain.

Figure 77. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-downstream. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The photo shows the grasses and woody vegetation.

Figure 76. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-
left bank.

Figure 77. South Fork Solomon River, Great Plains-downstream.

Figure 78. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-looking downstream at bridge, photo 1. Photo. This is the West Elk Creek in the Central Plains region looking downstream at the bridge. The bank vegetation is grasses and annuals.

Figure 79. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-looking downstream at bridge, photo 2. Photo. Like figure 78, this photo looks downstream at the bridge. The photo shows a large displacement in the left wingwall and the water line crossing the stream just upstream of the bridge.

Figure 78. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-
looking downstream at bridge, photo 1.

Figure 79. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-
looking downstream at bridge, photo 2.

Figure 80. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream of the bridge. Woody vegetation is shown on the right bank further upstream.

Figure 81. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. A single row of riparian trees is shown.

Figure 80. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 81. West Elk Creek, Central Plains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 82. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Beaver Creek in the Central Plains region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of grasses and annuals. Cows clearly have free access to the stream, causing considerable damage of the banks. The photo shows that the stream is both degrading and widening.

Figure 83. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Limited cattle access and riparian woody vegetation have limited the degradation in this part of the stream.

Figure 82. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 83. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 84. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-facing upstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream under the bridge. As shown in the photo, widening and bed degradation threaten the bridge.

Figure 85. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-facing downstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream under the bridge. The photo shows degradation with respect to the bridge.

Figure 84. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-
facing upstream under bridge.

Figure 85. Beaver Creek, Central Plains-
facing downstream under bridge.

Figure 86. Brush Creek, Central Plains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Brush Creek in the Central Plains region looking upstream from the bridge. A narrow row of riparian trees exists on the right bank. The left bank has experienced mass wasting, and the material is now the bank toe.
Figure 86. Brush Creek, Central Plains-upstream from bridge.

Figure 87. Brush Creek, Central Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The bank vegetation is thicker downstream than it is upstream.

Figure 87. Brush Creek, Central Plains- downstream from bridge.

Figure 88. Brush Creek, Central Plains-downstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream under the bridge. The bank material is beginning to slough.

 

Figure 88. Brush Creek, Central Plains-
downstream under bridge.

Figure 89. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is unnamed creek N 19 in the Central Plains region looking downstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is fairly thick; however, the bank width is irregular, indicating some mass wasting.

Figure 90. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The photo shows a high, fragile bank wall on the right bank.

Figure 89. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 90. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 91. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-upstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream under the bridge. Bank widening and bed degradation threaten the bridge.

Figure 92. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-downstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream under the bridge.

Figure 91. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-
upstream under bridge.

Figure 92. Unnamed creek (N 19), Central Plains-
downstream under bridge.

Figure 93. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is East Fork in the Interior Low Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is grasses, and the bank width is irregular due to lack of erosion resistance.

Figure 94. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-looking downstream at second bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge toward a second bridge. The bank width is again irregular.

Figure 93. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 94. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-
looking downstream at second bridge.

Figure 95. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The channel is well-aligned with the bridge.

Figure 96. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge.

Figure 95. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 96. East Fork, Interior Low Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 97. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Honey Run in the Interior Low Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation has been removed on the right bank and there mass wasting is occurring. Elsewhere, woody vegetation holds the banks in place.

Figure 98. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The stream exits the bridge at a high angle.

Figure 97. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 98. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 99. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The photo shows the high angle of exit.

Figure 100. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is fairly well-aligned with the bridge as it enters the opening.

Figure 99. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 100. Honey Run, Interior Low Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The hydraulics and hydrology research program at the TFHRC Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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