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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-072
Date: July 2006

Assessing Stream Channel Stability At Bridges in Physiographic Regions

 

APPENDIX A, continued.

Figure 201. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Trout Run in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Both banks are heavily covered with shrubs and trees.

Figure 202. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge showing vegetation that is similar to that upstream. The channel is widened at the bridge and narrows back to normal width downstream.

Figure 201. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 202. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 203. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the two-span bridge. The channel is overwidened, and riprap is mounded against the pier and abutments.

Figure 204. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-upstream face of bridge. Photo. This is looking at the upstream face of the bridge. The channel is badly aligned and must make a very tight bend to flow through the right span. There is considerable debris built up against the center pier.

Figure 203. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 204. Trout Run, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream face of bridge.

Figure 205. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Blackrock Run in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge. There are sparse trees and shrubs on the banks. Trees are leaning into the channel.

Figure 206. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are covered with sparse trees, many of which are falling into the channel.

Figure 205. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 206. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 207. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel narrows considerably under the bridge.

Figure 208. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. Trees are leaning into the channel, indicating failing banks.

Figure 207. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 208. Blackrock Run, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 209. Indian Run, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Indian Run in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge. The right bank is on the outside of a gentle meander bend. Bank vegetation on the right bank is grass (new trees have been planted), and trees and shrubs are on the left bank.

Figure 210. Indian Run, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge at a large midchannel bar deposited just downstream of the bridge. Banks are lined with trees and shrubs.

Figure 209. Indian Run, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 210. Indian Run, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 211. Indian Run, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the arch bridge. Fiber logs have been placed on the right bank in an attempt to prevent lateral migration. The channel has migrated against the right abutment of the bridge.

Figure 212. Indian Run, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The large central bar causes an obstruction to flow, forcing the flow into the opposite bank.

Figure 211. Indian Run, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 212. Indian Run, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 213. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Middle Patuxent River in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of moderately dense trees and shrubs. A midchannel bar is in the channel.

Figure 214. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge at a large midchannel island. Tree growth on the island indicates slow-to-no movement of the bar. Banks are covered with sparse-to-moderate trees and shrubs.

Figure 213. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 214. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 215. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the two-span bridge. The midchannel gravel bar is upstream of the bridge. The flow is slightly misaligned toward the left abutment.

Figure 216. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The flow divides around the island.

Figure 215. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 216. Middle Patuxent River, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 217. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Atherton Tributary in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of moderately dense trees, many of which are leaning into the channel. There are large rocks at the toes of both banks.

Figure 218. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Banks are covered with sparsely-to-moderately dense trees.

Figure 217. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 218. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 219. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. There are large rocks in the channel material.

Figure 220. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is well-aligned with the bridge. There is considerable debris accumulation upstream of the bridge.

Figure 219. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 220. Atherton Tributary, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 221. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Little Elk Creek in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge toward a meander bend. Bank vegetation consists of moderately dense trees. There is a narrow gravel bar along the left bank.

Figure 222. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge toward another river bend. Banks are covered with moderately dense trees.

Figure 221. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 222. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 223. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the covered bridge. Although the bridge is midway between two meander bends, it is fairly well-aligned with the channel.

Figure 224. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The bed material contains large rocks. The right bank is slightly eroded due to slow lateral shifting of the channel.

Figure 223. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 224. Little Elk Creek, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 225. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Big Beaver Creek in the Piedmont region looking upstream from the bridge. All vegetation has been removed for farming and cattle within 152.5 meters upstream of the bridge. The flow divides around a very large midchannel bar. The obstruction causes the flow to impinge on the right bank causing considerable erosion and a highly irregular bank width.

Figure 226. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Banks are covered with moderately dense trees. The channel is much narrower than upstream.

Figure 225. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 226. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 227. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is poorly aligned with the channel due to the midchannel bar and bank erosion.

Figure 228. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The channel exits the bridge opening at the center of the span.

Figure 227. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 228. Big Beaver Creek, Piedmont-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 229. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Buffalo Run in the Valley and Ridge region looking upstream from the bridge. Few trees are on the banks. The remaining vegetation is grass. The right bank has experienced erosion, and some riprap bank stabilization is in place. The channel appears to have been straightened.

Figure 230. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge toward a meander. Banks are covered with grass. The low banks indicate that there is no mass wasting.

Figure 229. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 230. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 231. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is fairly well-aligned with the bridge.

Figure 232. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge and a moderate alignment.

Figure 231. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 232. Buffalo Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 233. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge and the rock wall on the left bank. The bridge is just downstream of a tight meander bend.

Figure 234. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Roaring Run in the Valley and Ridge region looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are covered with dense trees. The right bank toe has rock placed to stabilize the bank.

Figure 233. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 234. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 235. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge toward a high riprap wall that has been constructed on the left bank to prevent lateral migration. Rock from the wall has been deposited in the stream, causing cross currents toward the opposite bank.

Figure 236. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge as the flow exits the meander bend.

Figure 235. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 236. Roaring Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 237. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is the Potter Run in the Valley and Ridge region looking downstream from the bridge. The left bank has a single row of trees. The right bank is covered with trees. The rapid flow in the foreground is exiting a cross vane downstream of the bridge.

Figure 238. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The left bank is covered with trees, the right bank is covered with grass. There is some erosion of the right bank where the grass is, causing a slightly irregular bank width. The flow is rapid.

Figure 237. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 238. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 239. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The flow is well-aligned with the bridge opening; however the opening is very narrow.

Figure 240. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The cross vane helps to calm the flow under the bridge.

Figure 239. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 240. Potter Run, Valley and Ridge-
looking upstream at bridge.

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The hydraulics and hydrology research program at the TFHRC Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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