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Publication Number: FHWA-04-121
Date: February 2005

Computer-Based Guidelines for Concrete Pavements Volume I-Project Summary

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REFERENCES

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  23. Lytton, R.L., Pufhl, D.E., Michalak, C.H., Lian, H.S., and Dempsey, B.J., An Integrated Model of the Climatic Effects on Pavements, FHWA-RD-90-033, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, 1990.
  24. Tabatabaie, A.M., Barenberg, E.J., and Smith, R.E., Longitudinal Joint Systems in Slip-Formed Rigid Pavements, Volume II. Analysis of Load Transfer Systems for Concrete Pavements, USDOT FAA-RD-79-4, II, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, 1979.
  25. Khazanovich, Lev and Gotlif, Alex, Evaluation of Joint and Crack Load Transfer, FHWA-RD-02-088, Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA, May 2003.
  26. Tayabji, S.D. and Colley, B.E., Analysis of Jointed Concrete Pavements, FHWA-RD-86-041, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, February 1986.
  27. Yu, H.T., Smith, K.D., Darter, M.I., Jiang, J., and Khazanovich, L., Performance of Concrete Pavements Volume III-Improving Concrete Pavement Performance, FHWA-RD-95-111, Federal Highway Administration, McLean, VA, 1995.
  28. Lee, Y.H. and Darter, M.I., Loading and Curling Stress Models for Concrete Pavement Design, Transportation Research Record No. 1449, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 1994.
  29. Lee, Y.H. and Darter, M.I., "Mechanistic Design Models of Loading and Curling in Concrete Pavements, Airport Pavement Innovations: Theory to Practice," Airfield Pavement Committee, Proceedings of the Conference, ASCE, New York, NY, 1993.
  30. Lee, Y.H., Yen, S.-T., Lee, C.-T., Bair, J.-H., and Lee, Y.-M., "Development of New Stress Analysis and Thickness Design Procedures for Jointed Concrete Pavements," Proceedings of the 6th International Conference of Concrete Pavements, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 1997.
  31. Simpson, A.L., Rauhut, J.B., Jordahl, P.R., Owusu-Antwi, E., Darter, M.I., Ahmad, R., Pendleton, O.J., Lee, Y.-H., Sensitivity Analyses for Selected Pavement Distresses. Strategic Highway Research Program, SHRP-P-393, National Research Council, Washington, D.C. 1994.
  32. Titus-Glover, L., Owusu-Antwi, E.B., and Darter, M.I., Design and Construction of PCC Pavements. Volume III: Improved PCC Performance Models, FHWA-RD-98-113, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, January 1999.
  33. Darter, M.I., Becker, J.M., Snyder, M.B., and Smith, R.E., Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Evaluation System, COPES, National Cooperative Highway Research Program Report 277, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, DC, September 1985.
  34. Lee, Y.H., and Lee, Y.M. Corner Stress Analysis of Jointed Concrete Pavements, Transportation Research Record No. 1525, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 1996.
  35. Senadheera, S.P. and Zollinger, D.G., Framework for Incorporation of Spalling in Design of Concrete Pavements, Transportation Research Record No. 1449, Transportation Research Board, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 1994.
  36. Senadheera, S. P. and Zollinger, D.G., Influence of Coarse Aggregate in Portland Cement Concrete on Spalling of Concrete Pavements, Research Report 1244-11, Texas Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX, 1994.
  37. Perera, R.W., Byrum, C., and Kohn, S.D., Investigation of Development of Pavement Roughness, FHWA-RD-97-147, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, May 1998.
  38. Hoerner, T.E., Improved Prediction Models for PCC Pavement Performance Related Specifications, Volume I: Final Report, FHWA-RD-00-130, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, December 2000.
  39. Won, M., Hankins, K. and McCullough, B.F., Mechanistic Analysis of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements Considering Material Characteristics, Variability and Fatigue, Research Report 1169-2, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, March 1991.
  40. Kim, S.M., Won, M.C., and McCullough, B.F., Development of a Finite-Element Program for Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements, Research Report 1758-1F, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, November 1997.
  41. Palmer, R.P., Olsen, M.P., Lytton, R.L., TTICRCP-A Mechanistic Model for the Prediction of Stresses, Strains and Displacements in Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements, Research Report 371-2F, Texas Transportation Institute, The Texas A&M University System, College Station, TX, 1988.
  42. Jimenez, M.A., McCullough, B.F., and Hankins, K., Monitoring of Siliceous River Gravel and Limestone Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement Test Sections in Houston Two Years after Placement, and Development of a Crack Width Model for the CRCP-7 Program, Research Report 1244-4, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, March 1992.
  43. Hansen, W., Jensen, Elin, Mohr, P., Jensen, K., Pane, I. and Mohamed, A., The Effects of Higher Strength and Associated Concrete Properties on Pavement Performance, FHWA-RD-00-161, June 2001.
  44. Dossey, T. and McCullough, B.F., Characterization of Concrete Properties with Age, Research Report 1244-2, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, March 1992.
  45. Kim, S.M., Won, M., and McCullough, B.F., "Three-Dimensional Analysis of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements," Transportation Research Board 79th Annual Meeting, January 9-13, 2000.
  46. Zollinger, D.G., Buch, N., Xin, D., and Soares, J., Performance of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements, Volume VI: CRC Pavement Design, Construction and Performance, FHWA-RD-97-151, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, 1999.
  47. Zollinger, D. and Senadheera, S., "Spalling of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements," Journal of Transportation Engineering, Vol. 120, No. 3, May/June 1994.
  48. Lee, Y.H. and Darter, M.I., Development of Performance Prediction Models for Illinois Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavements, Research Report No. 1505, Transportation Research Record, pp. 75-84, 1995.
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  52. Hoerner, T.E. and Darter, M.I., Guide to Developing Performance-Related Specifications for PCC Pavements, Volume I: Practical Guide, Final Report, and Appendix A, FHWA-RD-98-155, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, February 1999.
  53. Hoerner, T.E., Darter, M.I., Tarr, S.M., and Okamoto, P.A., Guide to Developing Performance-Related Specifications for PCC Pavements, Volume II: Appendix B-Field Demonstrations, FHWA-RD-98-156, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, February 1999.
  54. Hoerner, T.E., Tarr, S.M., Darter, M.I., and Okamoto, P.A., Guide to Developing Performance-Related Specifications for PCC Pavements, Volume III: Appendixes C through F, FHWA-RD-98-171, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, February 1999.
  55. Hoerner, T.E., Guide to Developing Performance-Related Specifications for PCC Pavements, Vol. IV: Appendix G-PaveSpec 2.0 User Guide, FHWA-RD-99-059, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, February 1999.
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  59. Simon, M.J, Concrete Mixture Optimization Using Statistical Methods, FHWA-RD-03-060, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, September 2003.
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  61. Tia, M., Bloomquist, D., Yang, M.C.K., Soongswang, P., and Meletiou, C.A., Field and Laboratory Study of Modulus of Rupture and Permeability of Structural Concretes in Florida, Final Report FL/DOT/SMO/89/361, Department of Civil Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 1990.
  62. Ruiz, J.M, Rasmussen, R.O., Nelson, P.K., Merritt, D.K., Chang, G.K., and Dick, J.C., Computer-Based Guidelines for Job-Specific Optimization of Paving Concrete, FHWA Contract DTFH61-02-C-00081, Interim Report, The Transtec Group, 2003.
  63. Data Collection (LTPP), http://www.tfhrc.gov/pavement/ltpp/data.htm, date last modified 3/21/03. Last accessed on February 9, 2004.
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  65. Suh, Y.C., Hankins K., and McCullough, B.F., Early-Age Behavior of Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement and Calibration of the Failure Prediction Model in the CRCP-7 Program, Research Report 1244-3, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, March 1992.
  66. Otero, M.A., McCullough, B.F., and Hankins, K., Monitoring of Siliceous River Gravel and Limestone Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement Test Sections in Houston 2 Years After Placement, and Development of a Crack Width Model for the CRCP-7 Program, Research Report 1244-4, Center for Transportation Research, The University of Texas at Austin, March 1992.
  67. Nam, J.H., Kim, S.M, McCullough, B.F., and Dossey, T., Sensitivity Analysis of CRCP Computer Programs, Research Report 1700-4, Texas Department of Transportation, March 2003.
  68. Ruiz, J.M., Kim, P.J., Schindler, A.K., and Rasmussen, R.O., Validation of HIPERPAV for Prediction of Early-Age Jointed Concrete Pavement Behavior, Transportation Research Record No. 1778. Washington, DC, 2001.
  69. AASHTO Guide for Design of Pavement Structures 1993, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC, 1993.

[1] HIPERPAV alone with no preceding numeral refers to the overall concrete pavement design and construction guidelines, while HIPERPAV I and HIPERPAV II refer to the two different software generations.

[2] CEB stands for Euro-International Concrete Committee (Comité Euro-International du Béton), FIB stands for International Concrete Federation (Fédération Internationale du Béton)

 

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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