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Publication Number: FHWA-RD-01-169
Date: October 2005

Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements: SPS-6, Initial Evaluation and Analysis

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FOREWORD

The Long-Term Pavement Performance (LTPP) program Specific Pavement Studies 6 (SPS-6) experiment, "Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements," is one of the key experiments of the LTPP program. The main objective of this experiment is to determine the effects of specific rehabilitation design features that directly influence the long-term effectiveness of rehabilitated jointed plain concrete pavements (JPCP) and jointed reinforced concrete pavements (JRCP). This report documents the first comprehensive review and evaluation of the SPS-6 experiment. The evaluation concludes that many important and useful findings and results can be obtained from the SPS-6 experiment despite several limitations resulting from not constructing a few of the test sites and the few construction deviations that occurred. In addition, some materials and traffic data are missing from some sites or sections, which are important to achieving the objectives of the experiment. These data are now being sought from the SPS-6 sites.

Some interesting and important early trends have already been identified that will be useful to the rehabilitation of JPCP, even though the sections were only a maximum of 10 years old at the time of this study. As time and traffic loadings accumulate on the SPS-6 sites, much more valuable performance data will be obtained. For example, the direct comparison of the performance of the designs with and without fractured concrete is of intense interest to State highway agencies. Future analyses of the performance data from the SPS-6 experiment will lead to significant new and important findings on the value of: minimum and maximum preparation with and without an asphalt concrete (AC) overlay; sawing and sealing of AC joints; fracturing of the concrete pavement prior to an AC overlay; existing concrete pavement conditions prior to rehabilitation; traffic level; and climate. These findings will lead to more reliable and cost-effective rehabilitation designs for JPCP.

This report will be of interest to highway agency engineers involved in the design, construction, and management of the pavements, and also to future researchers who will analyze the performance of the SPS-6 sections.

Steve Chase, Ph.D.
Acting Director, Office of Infrastructure
Research and Development

 

NOTICE

This document is disseminated under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Transportation in the interest of information exchange. The U.S. Government assumes no liability for the use of the information contained in this document. This report does not constitute a standard, specification, or regulation.

The U.S. Government does not endorse products or manufacturers. Trademarks or manufacturers' names appear in this report only because they are considered essential to the objective of the document.

Quality Assurance Statement

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) provides high-quality information to serve Government, industry, and the public in a manner that promotes public understanding. Standards and policies are used to ensure and maximize the quality, objectivity, utility, and integrity of its information. FHWA periodically reviews quality issues and adjusts its programs and processes to ensure continuous quality improvement.

 

Technical Report Documentation Page

1. Report No.
FHWA-RD-01-169
2. Government Accession No. 3. Recipient's Catalog No.
4. Title and Subtitle
REHABILITATION OF JOINTED PORTLAND CEMENT CONCRETE PAVEMENTS: SPS-6— INITIAL EVALUATION AND ANALYSIS
5. Report Date
October 2005
6. Performing Organization Code
7. Author(s)
Joanna K. Ambroz and Michael I. Darter
8. Performing Organization Report No.
9. Performing Organization Name and Address
ERES Consultants
A Division of Applied Research Associates, Inc.
9030 Red Branch Road, Suite 210
Columbia, MD 21045
10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS)
C6B
11. Contract or Grant No.
DTFH61-98-Y-50030
12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address
Office of Infrastructure Research and Development
Federal Highway Administration
6300 Georgetown Pike
McLean, VA 22101-2296
13. Type of Report and Period Covered
Final Report
October 1999 to February 2000
14. Sponsoring Agency Code
15. Supplementary Notes
Work was conducted as part of the LTPP data analysis technical support contract.
Contracting Officer's Technical Representative (COTR): Cheryl Allen Richter, HRDI-13
16. Abstract

The Specific Pavement Studies 6 (SPS-6) experiment, "Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements," was designed as a controlled field experiment that focuses on the study of specific rehabilitation design features of jointed plain concrete pavements (JPCP) and jointed reinforced concrete pavements (JRCP). This experiment examines the effects of climatic regions (wet-freeze, wet-no freeze, dry-freeze, or dry-no freeze), type of concrete pavement (plain or reinforced), condition of existing pavement prior to rehabilitation (fair or poor), and traffic rate (as a covariant), incorporating the different methods of rehabilitation with and without asphalt concrete (AC) overlays. This report documents the first comprehensive review and evaluation of the SPS-6 experiment. Fourteen SPS-6 projects have been constructed. At each site, there are eight core sections plus various numbers of supplemental sections.

Data availability and completeness for the SPS-6 experiment are good overall. In general, most of the data are at the releasable level E status. However, some data, such as traffic, climatic, and materials data, are not yet available in the Information Management System (IMS) database. These deficiencies need to be addressed before a comprehensive analysis of the SPS-6 experiment is conducted. The required experimental design factors were compared with the actual constructed values. This includes both the site condition factors and the pavement design features. Most SPS-6 sections follow the experimental design for the great majority of the design factors. Three of the 14 sites are still relatively new and, therefore, do not have much data available at this time. It is believed that the information has been collected and is in the process of being entered into the IMS database.

This evaluation has shown that several significant problems clearly limit the results that can be obtained from the SPS-6 experiment. Specifically, no SPS-6 projects were built in certain climatic regions. Some SPS-6 sites have construction deviations, and significant materials data and traffic data are missing from other sites or sections. However, even though the SPS-6 sections are relatively young, some interesting and important early trends have already been identified that will be useful to the rehabilitation of jointed portland cement concrete (PCC) pavements. As time and traffic loadings accumulate, much more valuable performance data will be obtained. It is believed that even more results can be obtained if a concerted effort is made to obtain missing data (materials, traffic, climate, and monitoring) and to perform proper analyses of the data. Specific recommendations for further analyses are included.

17. Key Words
AC overlay, CPR, crack and seal, design factors, experimental design, JPCP, JRCP, LTPP, performance trends, rehabilitation, SPS-6.
18. Distribution Statement
No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161.
19. Security Classif. (of this report)
Unclassified
20. Security Classif. (of this page)
Unclassified
21. No. of Pages
296
22. Price

Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-72) Reproduction of completed page authorized

SI (Modern Metric) Conversion Factors

Preface

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF FIGURES

LIST OF TABLES

FHWA-RD-01-169

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