Skip to contentUnited States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration FHWA Home
Research Home   |   Pavements Home
REPORT
This report is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-12-030
Date: August 2012

 

Estimation of Key PCC, Base, Subbase, and Pavement Engineering Properties From Routine Tests and Physical Characteristics

PDF Version (4.44 MB)

PDF files can be viewed with the Acrobat® Reader®

REFERENCES

1.            American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. (2008). Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide, Interim Edition: A Manual of Practice, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

2.            National Cooperative Highway Research Program. (2004). Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide, NCHRP Project 1-37A, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC. Obtained from: http://www.trb.org/mepdg/guide.htm. Site last accessed April 2010.

3.            Federal Highway Administration. (2009). Long-Term Pavement Performance Program Standard Data Release 23.0, VR2009.01, DVD Version, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

4.            National Cooperative Highway Research Program. (2006). Research Results Digest 308: Changes to the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design Guide Software Through Version 0.900, NCHRP Project 1-40D, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

5.            Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center. How to Get LTPP Data, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC. Obtained from: http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/research/ tfhrc/programs/infrastructure/pavements/ltpp/getdata.cfm.

6.            National Cooperative Highway Research Program. (2009). User Manual and Local Calibration Guide for the Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Guide and Software, Final Report, Project NCHRP 1-40B, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

7.            Irick, P.E., Seeds, S.B., Myers, M.G., and Moody, E.D. (1990). Development of Performance-Related Specifications for Portland Cement Concrete Pavement Construction, Final Report, Report No. FHWA-RD-89-211, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

8.            Okamoto, P., Wu, C.L., Tarr, S.M., Darter, M.I., and Smith, K.D. (1993). Performance Related Specifications for Concrete Pavements, Report No. FHWA-RD-93-044, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

9.            Hoerner, T.E., Darter, M.I., Khazanovich, L., Titus-Glover, L., and Smith, K.L. (2000). Improved Prediction Models for PCC Pavement Performance-Related Specifications, Volume I: Final Report, Report No. FHWA-RD-00-130, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

10.        Rao, C., Darter, M.I., Smit, A.F., Mallela, J., Smith, K.L., Von Quintus, H.L., and Grove, J. (2006). Advanced Quality Systems: Guidelines for Establishing and Maintaining Construction Quality Databases, Report No. FHWA- HRT-07-019, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

11.        Hoerner, T.E. and Darter, M.I. (2000). Improved Prediction Models for PCC Pavement Performance-Related Specifications, Volume II: PaveSpec 3.0 User’s Guide Report, Report No. FHWA-RD-00-131, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

12.        AASHTO. (1993). Guide for Design of Pavement Structures, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

13.        Rao, C., Mallela, J., Darter, M.I., and Titus-Glover, L. (2007). Concrete Mix Properties to Optimize Concrete Pavement Performance Using the MEPDG, Proceedings for International Conference on Optimizing Paving Concrete Mixtures and Accelerated Concrete Pavement Construction and Rehabilitation, Atlanta, GA.

14.        Bazant, Z.P. (2000). “Criteria for Rational Prediction of Creep and Shrinkage of Concrete,” Adam Neville Symposium: Creep and Shrinkage—Structural Design Effects, ACI SP–194, A. Al-Manaseer, Ed., American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI.

15.        Mallela, J., Titus-Glover, L., Ayers, M.E., and Wilson, T.P. (2001). Characterization of Mechanical Properties and Variability of PCC Materials for Rigid Pavement Design, Proceedings from the 7th International Conference on Concrete Pavements, Orlando, FL.

16.        Mallela, J., Abbas, A., Harman, T., Rao, C., Liu, R., and Darter, M.I. (2005). “Measurement and Significance of the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Concrete in Rigid Pavement Design,” Transportation Research Record 1919, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

17.        AASHTO T 22. (2006). Standard Test Method for Compressive Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

18.        ASTM C 469. (2010). “Standard Test Method for Static Modulus of Elasticity and Poisson's Ratio of Concrete in Compression,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.02, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

19.        AASHTO T 97. (2010). Standard Method of Test for Flexural Strength of Concrete (Using Simple Beam with Third-Point Loading), American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

20.        AASHTO T 198. (2002). Standard Method of Test for Splitting Tensile Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

21.        AASHTO T 121. (2005). Standard Method of Test for Density (Unit Weight), Yield, and Air Content (Gravimetric) of Concrete, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

22.        AASHTO T 152. (2005). Standard Method of Test for Air Content of Freshly Mixed Concrete by the Pressure Method, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

23.        AASHTO T 196M/T 196. (2005). Standard Method of Test For Air Content of Freshly Mixed Concrete by the Volumetric Method, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

24.        AASHTO TP 60. (2000). Standard Test Method for the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

25.        ASTM E1952. (2006). “Standard Test Method for Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Diffusivity by Modulated Temperature Differential Scanning Calorimetry,” Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Vol. 14.02, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

26.        ASTM D2766. (2009). “Standard Test Method for Specific Heat of Liquids and Solids,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 05.01, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

27.        ASTM D4694. (2009). “Standard Test Method for Deflections with a Falling-Weight-Type Impulse Load Device,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.03, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

28.        AASHTO T 307. (1999). Standard Method of Test for Determining the Resilient Modulus of Soils and Aggregate Materials, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

29.        National Cooperative Highway Research Program. (2004). Research Results Digest No. 285: Laboratory Determination of Resilient Modulus for Flexible Pavement Design, National Cooperative Highway Research Program, Washington, DC.

30.        AASHTO T 180. (2010), Standard Method of Test for Moisture-Density Relations of Soils Using a 4.54-kg (10-lb) Rammer and a 457-mm (18-in.) Drop, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

31.        AASHTO T 100. (2006), Standard Method of Test for Specific Gravity of Soils, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

32.        AASHTO T 215. (2003), Standard Method of Test for Permeability of Granular Soils (Constant Head), American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

33.        AASHTO T 99. (2010), Standard Method of Test for Moisture-Density Relations of Soils Using a 2.5-kg (5.5-lb) Rammer and a 305-mm (12-in.) Drop, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

34.        ASTM D5858. (2008). “Standard Guide for Calculating In Situ Equivalent Elastic Moduli of Pavement Materials Using Layered Elastic Theory,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.03, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

35.        The Transtec Group. HIPERPAV: High-Performance Paving Software, Austin, TX. Obtained from: www.hiperpav.com.

36.        ASTM C 39. (2012). “Standard Test Method for Compressive Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.02, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

37.        Ozyildirim, C. and Carino, N.J. (2006). “Concrete Strength Testing,” Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete & Concrete Making Materials, Chapter 3, ASTM STP 169D, West Conshohocken, PA.

38.        Carino, N.J. (2006). “Prediction of Potential Concrete Strength at Later Ages,” Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete & Concrete Making Materials, Chapter 4, ASTM STP 169D, West Conshohocken, PA.

39.        Mehta, P.K. and Monteiro, P.J.M. (2005). Concrete, 3d Edition, McGraw Hill Companies, New York, NY.

40.        Neville, A.M. (1996). Properties of Concrete, 4th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY.

41.        Abrams, D.A. (1918). Design of Concrete Mixtures, Structural Materials Research Lab, Lewis Institute Bulletin No. 1, Chicago, IL.

42.        Colak, A. (2006). “A New Model for the Estimation of Compressive Strength of Portland Cement Concrete,” Cement and Concrete Research, Netherlands36(7).

43.        Alexander, M.G. and Mindess, S. (2005). Aggregates in Concrete, Taylor & Francis, New York, NY.

44.        Gilkey, H.J. (1961). “Water-Cement Ratio Versus Strength—Another Look,”ACI Materials Journal, 57(4), Farmington Hills, MI.

45.        Bloem, D.L. and Gaynor, R.D. (1963). “Effects of Aggregate Properties on Strength of Concrete,” ACI Materials Journal, 60(10), Farmington Hills, MI.

46.        Kaplan, M.F. (1959). “Flexural and Compressive Strength of Concrete as Affected by the Properties of Coarse Aggregates,” Proceedings ACI, 55, Farmington Hills, MI.

47.        Bennett, E.W. and Khilji, Z.M. (1964). “The Effect of Some Properties of the Coarse Aggregate in Hardened Concrete,” Journal of the British Granite and Whinstone Federation, 3(2).

48.        De Larrard, F. and Bellock, A. (1997). “The Influence of Aggregate on the Compressive Strength of Normal and High Strength Concrete,” ACI Material Journal, 94(5), Farmington Hills, MI.

49.        ACI 318-05. (2005). Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete and Commentary, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI.

50.        Namyong, J., Sangchun, Y., and Hongbum, C. (2004). “Prediction of Compressive Strength of In Situ Concrete Based on Mixture Proportions,” Journal of Asian Architecture and Building Engineering, 3(1), Farmington Hills, MI.

51.        Committee Euro-International du Beton (CEB-FIP). (1993). CEB-FIP Model Code 1990, Thomas Telford, London, United Kingdom.

52.        Ruiz, J.M., Rasmussen, R.O., Chang, G.K., Dick, J.C., Nelson, P.K., Schindler, A.K., Turner, D.K., and Wilde J.W. (2006). Computer-Based Guidelines for Concrete Pavements, Volume III: Technical Appendices, Report No. FHWA-HRT-04-127, Federal Highway Administration, Washington DC.

53.        Wang, K., Hu, J., and Zhi, G.E. (2008). Task 4: Testing Iowa Portland Cement Concrete Mixtures for the AASHTO Mechanistic-Empirical Pavement Design Procedure, CTRE Project 06-270, Ames, IA.

54.        Powers, T.C. (1949). The Nonevaporable Water Content of Hardened Portland Cement Paste—Its Significance for Concrete Researchers and Its Method of Determination, ASTM Bulletin No. 158, West Conshohocken, PA.

55.        Tango, C.E.S. (2000). Time-Generalization of Abrams’ Model for High-Performance Concrete and Practical Application Examples, Proceedings of the International Symposium on High-Performance Concrete, Hong Kong, China.

56.        Forster, S.W. (1997). Concrete Materials and Mix Design for Assuring Durable Pavements, Volume 1, Sixth International Purdue Conference on Concrete Pavement Design and Materials for High Performance, Indianapolis, IN.

57.        Mohamed, A.R. and Hansen, W. (1999). “Micromechanical Modeling of Crack-Aggregate Interaction in Concrete Materials,” Journal of Cement and Concrete Composites, 21, 349–359.

58.        ASTM C 78-02. (2006). “Standard Test Method for Flexural Strength of Concrete (Using Simple Beam with Third-Point Loading),” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.02, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

59.        Kaplan, M.F. (1959). Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity, Dynamic Modulus of Elasticity, Poisson Ratio, and Strength of Concrete Made with Thirteen Difference Coarse Aggregates, RILEM Bulletin No. 1, Bagneux, France.

60.        ASTM C 496-90. (1995). “Standard Test Method for Splitting Tensile Strength of Cylindrical Concrete Specimens,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.02, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

61.        Wood, S.L. (1992). “Evaluation of the Long-Term Properties of Concrete,” Research and Development Bulletin RD102T, Portland Cement Association, Skokie, IL.

62.        Teychenne, D.C. (1954). Discussion on the Design of Concrete Mixes on the Basis of Flexural Strength, Proceedings of a Symposium on Mix Design and Quality Control of Concrete, 153, Cement and Concrete Association, London, United Kingdom.

63.        The Concrete Society. (2003). Concrete Industrial Ground Floors—A Guide to Their Design and Construction, Technical Report 34, Third Ed, Crowthorne, Berkshire, UK.

64.        Carrasquillo, R.L., Nilson, A.H., and Slate, F.O. (1981). “Properties of High-Strength Concrete Subjected to Short-Term Loads,” ACI Materials Journal, Proceedings, 78(3), Farmington Hills, MI.

65.        Legeron, F. and Paultre, P. (2000). “Prediction of Modulus of Rupture of Concrete,” ACI Materials Journal, 97(2), Farmington Hills, MI.

66.        Sozen, M.A., Zwoyer, E.M., and Siess, C.P. (1959). Strength in Shear of Beams Without Web Reinforcement, University of Illinois Engineering Experiment Station Bulletin No. 452, Urbana, IL.

67.        Mindess, S. and Young, J.F. (1981). Concrete, Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ.

68.        Iravani, S. (1996). “Mechanical Properties of High-Performance Concrete,” ACI Materials Journal, 93(5), Farmington Hills, MI.

69.        Gardner, N.J. and Poon, S.M. (1976). “Time and Temperature Effects on Tensile, Bond, and Compressive Strengths,” ACI Materials Journal, 73(7), Farmington Hills, MI.

70.        Oluokun, F.A. (1991). “Prediction of Concrete Tensile Strength From Compressive Strength: Evaluation of Existing Relations for Normal Weight Concrete,” ACI Materials Journal, 88(3), Farmington Hills, MI.

71.        Kim, J-K., Han, S.H., and Song, Y.C. (2002). “Effect of Temperature and Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Concrete—Part I: Experimental Results,” Cement and Concrete Research, Netherlands.

72.        Kim, J-K., Han, S.H., and Song, Y.C. (2002). “Effect of Temperature and Aging on the Mechanical Properties of Concrete—Part II: Prediction Model,” Cement and Concrete Research, Netherlands.

73.        La Rue, H. (1946). “Modulus of Elasticity of Aggregates and Their Effect on Concrete,” ASTM Proceedings, 46, West Conshohocken, PA.

74.        Meininger, R.C. (2006). “Degradation Resistance, Strength, and Related Properties of Aggregates,” Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete & Concrete-Making Materials, ASTM STP 169D, West Conshohocken, PA.

75.        Hashin, Z. (1962). “The Elastic Moduli of Heterogeneous Materials,” Journal of Applied Mechanics, 29(1), Santa Barbara, CA.

76.        Hirsh, T.J. (1962). “Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete affected by Elastic Moduli of Cement Paste Matrix and Aggregate,” Journal Proceedings, 59(3), Farmington Hills, MI.

77.        Counto, U.J. (1964). “The Effect of Elastic Modulus of the Aggregate on the Elastic Modulus, Creep, and Creep Recovery of Concrete,” Magazine of Concrete Research, 16.

78.        Hansen, T.C. and Nielsen, K.E.C. (1965). “Influence of Aggregate Properties on Concrete Shrinkage,” Journal ACI, 63(7), Farmington Hills, MI.

79.        Hobbs, D.W. (1971). “The Dependence of Bulk Modulus, Young’s Modulus, Creep, Shrinkage and Thermal Expansion of Concrete upon Aggregate Volume Concentration,” Materials and Structures, 4.

80.        Ahmad, S.H. (1994). “Short Term Mechanical Properties,” High-Performance Concrete and Applications, London, United Kingdom.

81.        Alexander, M.G. and Davis, D.E. (1991). “Aggregate in Concrete—New Assessment of Their Role,” Concrete Beton, 59, 10–20.

82.        Alexander, M.G. and Davis, D.E. (1992). “The Influence of Aggregates on the Compressive Strength and Elastic Modulus of Concrete,” The Civil Engineer in South Africa, 34.

83.        Noguchi, T., Tomosawa, F., Nemati, K., Chiaia, B., Fantilli, A. (2009). “A Practical Equation for Elastic Modulus of Concrete,” ACI Structural Journal, 106(5), Farmington Hills, MI.

84.        Tomosawa, F., Noguchi, T., and Onoyama, K. (1990). Investigation of Fundamental Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Concrete, Summaries of Technical Papers of Annual Meeting of Architectural Institute of Japan, 497–498.

85.        TS 500 Ankara. (2000). Turkish Standardization Institute Requirements for Design and Construction of Reinforced Concrete Structures, Turkish Standards Institute, Ankara, Turkey.

86.        Westergard, H.M. (1927). “Analysis of Stresses in Concrete Pavements Due to Variations of Temperature,” Highway Research Board Proceedings, 6, 201–215, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

87.        AASHTO T 336. (2009), Standardized Test Method for the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Hydraulic Cement Concrete, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington, DC.

88.        Al-Ostaz. (2007). Inputs of Portland Cement Concrete Parameters Needed for the Design of New and Rehabilitated Pavements in Mississippi, Report No. FHWA/MSDOT-RD-07-177, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

89.        ACI. (1971). Temperature and Concrete, ACI SP-25, American Concrete Institute, Detroit, MI.

90.        Lane, D.S. (1994). “Thermal Properties of Aggregates,” Significance of Tests and Properties of Concrete and Concrete-Making Materials, ASTM STP 169C, West Conshohocken, PA.

91.        Neekhra, S. (2004). A New Mineralogical Approach to Predict the Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Aggregate and Concrete: A Thesis, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX.

92.        Powers, T.C. (1971). “Fundamental Aspects of Concrete Shrinkage,” Materials and Structures/Materiaux et Constructions, (545), 79–85.

93.        Troxell, G.E., Raphael, J.M., and Davis, R.E. (1958). “Long-Time Creep and Shrinkage Tests of Plain and Reinforced Concrete,” ASTM Proceedings, 58, 1–20, West Conshohocken, PA.

94.        Bazant, Z.P. and Baweja, S. (2000). “Creep and Shrinkage Prediction Model for Analysis and Design of Concrete Structures: Model B3,” Adam Neville Symposium: Creep and Shrinkage—Structural Design Effects, ACI SP–194, American Concrete Institute, Farmington Hills, MI.

95.        Arellano, D. and Thompson, M.R. (1998). Final Report: Stabilized Base Properties (Strength, Modulus, Fatigue) for Mechanistic-Based Airport Pavement Design, COE Report No. 4, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL.

96.        Thompson, M.R. (1986). Mechanistic Design Concept for Stabilized Base Pavements, Transportation Engineering Series No. 46, Illinois Cooperative Highway and Transportation Series No. 214, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL.

97.        ASTM D1633. (2007). “Standard Test Methods for Compressive Strength of Molded Soil-Cement Cylinders,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.08, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

98.        American Coal Ash Association. (1991). Flexible Pavement Manual, American Coal Ash Association, Washington, DC.

99.        ASTM C593. (2006). “Standard Specification for Fly Ash and Other Pozzolans for Use With Lime for Soil Stabilization,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.01, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

100.    Little, D.N. (2000). Evaluation of Structural Properties of Lime Stabilized Soils and Aggregates, Volume 3: Mixture Design and Testing Protocol for Lime Stabilized Soils, National Lime Association, Arlington, VA.

101.    ASTM D5102. (2009). “Standard Test Method for Unconfined Compressive Strength of Compacted Soil-Lime Mixtures,” Annual Book of Standards Volume 04.08, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA.

102.    National Cooperative Highway Research Program. (2008). NCHRP Synthesis 382: Estimating Stiffness of Subgrade and Unbound Materials for Pavement Design, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

103.    Transportation Research Board. (2003). Harmonized Test Methods for Laboratory Determination of Resilient Modulus for Flexible Pavement Design, NCHRP Project 1-28A, National Cooperative Highway Research Program, Washington, DC.

104.    Carmichael III, R.F. and Stuart, E. (1985). “Predicting Resilient Modulus: A Study to Determine the Mechanical Properties of Subgrade Soils,” Transportation Research Record 1043, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

105.    Drumm, E.C., Boateng-Poku, Y., and Johnson Pierce, T. (1990). “Estimation of Subgrade Resilient Modulus from Standard Tests,” Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, 116(5), Reston, VA.

106.    George, K.P. (2004). Prediction of Resilient Modulus from Soil Index Properties, Report No. FHWA/MS-DOT-RD-04-172, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

107.    Heukelom, W. and Klomp, A.J.G. (1962). Dynamic Testing as a Means of Controlling Pavements During and After Construction, Proceedings of the First International Conference on Structural Design of Asphalt Pavements, Ann Arbor, MI.

108.    Asphalt Institute. (1982). Research and Development of the Asphalt Institute’s Thickness Design Manual, Report No. 82-2, Ninth Edition, Asphalt Institute, Lexington, KY.

109.    Webb, W.M. and Campbell, B.E. (1986). Preliminary Investigation into Resilient Modulus Testing for New AASHTO Pavement Design Guide, Georgia Department of Transportation, Atlanta, GA.

110.    Yeh, S.T. and Su, C.K. (1989). Resilient Properties of Colorado Soils, Report No. CDOH-DH-SM-89-9, Colorado Department of Highways, Denver, CO.

111.    Jones, M.P. and Witczak, M.W. (1972). “Subgrade Modulus on the San Diego Test Road,” Transportation Research Record 641, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

112.    Thompson, M.R. and LaGrow, T.G. (1988). A Proposed Conventional Flexible Pavement Thickness Design Procedure, Report No. FHWA-IL-UI-223, Illinois Department of Transportation, Springfield, IL.

113.    Thompson, M.R. and Robnett, Q.L. (1979). “Resilient Properties of Subgrade Soils,” Journal of Transportation Engineering, 105(1), Reston, VA.

114.    Elliot, R.P., Thorton, S.I., Foo, K.Y., Siew, K.W., and Woodbridge, R. (1988). Resilient Properties of Arkansas Subgrades, Report No. FHWA/AR-89/004, Arkansas Highway and Transportation Research Center, Little Rock, AK.

115.    Rahim, A.M. (2005). “Subgrade Soil Index Properties to Estimate Resilient Modulus for Pavement Design,” The International Journal of Pavement Engineering, 6(3), London, England.

116.    Farrar, M. and Turner, J. (1991). Resilient Modulus of Wyoming Subgrade Soils, Report No. MPC 91-1, Mountains-Plains Consortium, Fargo, ND.

117.    Hudson, J.M., Drumm, E.C., and Madgett, M. (1994). Design Handbook for the Estimation of Resilient Response of Fine-Grained Subgrades, 4th International Conference on the Bearing Capacity of Roads and Airfields, Minneapolis, MN.

118.    Li, D. and Selig, E.T. (1994). “Resilient Modulus for Fine-Grained Subgrade Soils,” Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, 120(6), Reston, VA.

119.    Gupta, S., Ranaivoson, A., Edil, T., Benson, C., and Sawangsuriya, A. (2007). Pavement Design Using Unsaturated Soil Technology, MN/RC-2007-11, Minnesota Department of Transportation, St. Paul, MN.

120.    Berg, R.L., Bigl, S.R., Stark, J.A., and Durell, G.D. (1996). Resilient Modulus Testing of Materials from Mn/ROAD: Phase 1, CRREL Special Report 96-19, Minnesota Department of Transportation, St. Paul, MN.

121.    Pezo, R.F. and Hudson, W.R. (1994). “Prediction Models of Resilient Modulus for Nongranular Materials,” Geotechnical Testing Journal, 17(3), Washington, DC.

122.    Powell, W.D., Potter, J.F., Mayhew, H.C., and Nunn, M.E. (1984). Transport and Road Research Laboratory: The Structural Design of Bituminous Roads, TRRL Report 1132, Department of Transport, Berkshire, United Kingdom.

123.    Asphalt Institute. (1999). Thickness Design: Asphalt Pavements for Highways and Streets, Series No. 1, Asphalt Institute, Lexington, KY.

124.    Buu, T. (1980). “Correlation of Resistance R-Value and Resilient Modulus of Idaho Subgrade Soil,” Special Report No. ML-08-80-G, Idaho Department of Transportation, Boise, ID.

125.    Lee, W., Bohra, N.C., Altschaeffl, A.G., and White, T.D. (1997). “Resilient Modulus of Cohesive Soils,” Journal of Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering, 123(2), Reston, VA.

126.    Hassan, A. (1996). The Effect of Material Parameters on Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Results for Fine-Grained Soils and Granular Materials, Ph.D. Dissertation, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK.

127.    Chen, J.Z., Mustaque, H., and LaTorella, M.T. (1999). “Use of Falling Weight Deflectometer and Dynamic Cone Penetrometer in Pavement Evaluation,” Transportation Research Record 1655, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

128.    George, K.P. and Uddin, W. (2000). Subgrade Characterization for Highway Design, FHWA/MS-DOT-RD-00-131, Mississippi Department of Transportation, Jackson, MS.

129.    Chen, D.H., Lin, D.F., Liau, P.H., and Bilyeu, J. (2005). “A Correlation Between Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Values and Pavement Layer Moduli,” Geotechnical Testing Journal, 28(1), Washington, DC.

130.    Mohammad, L.N., Herath, A., Gaspard, K., Abu-Farsakh, M.Y., and Gudishala, R. (2007). “Prediction of Resilient Modulus of Cohesive Subgrade Soils from Dynamic Cone Penetrometer Test Parameters,” Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, 19(11), Reston, VA.

131.    Mohammad, L.N., Titi, H.H., and Herath, A. (2000). Investigation of the Applicability of Intrusion Technology to Estimate the Resilient Modulus of Subgrade Soil, FHWA/LA-00/332, Louisiana Transportation Research Center, Baton Rouge, LA.

132.    Von Quintus, H. and Killingsworth, B. (1998). Analyses Relating to Pavement Material Characterizations and Their Effects on Pavement Performance, Report No. FHWARD-97-085, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

133.    Dai, S. and Zollars, J. (2002). “Resilient Modulus of Minnesota Road Research Project Subgrade Soil,” Transportation Research Record 1786, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

134.    Santha, B.L. (1994). “Resilient Modulus of Subgrade Soils: Comparison of Two Constitutive Equations,” Transportation Research Record 1462, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

135.    Yau, A. and Von Quintus, H.L. (2002). Study of LTPP Laboratory Resilient Modulus Test Data and Response Characteristics, Final Report, Report No. FHWA-RD-02-051, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

136.    Larson, G. and Dempsey, B.J. (1997). Enhanced Integrated Climatic Model, Version 2.0, Final Report, Contract DTFA MN/DOT 72114, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL.

137.    Zapata, C. and Houston, W.N. (2008). NCHRP Report 602: Calibration and Validation of the Enhanced Integrated Climatic Model for Pavement Design, NCHRP Project 9-23, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

138.    Titi, H., Elias, M.B., and Helwany, S. (2006). Determination of Typical Resilient Modulus Values for Selected Soils in Wisconsin, Report No. WHRP 0092-03-11, Wisconsin Department of Transportation, Madison, WI.

139.    Rahim, A.M. and George, K.P. (2005). “Models to Estimate Subgrade Resilient Modulus for Pavement Design,” The International Journal of Pavement Engineering, 6(2), London, England.

140.    Mohammad, L.N., Huang, B., Puppala, A.J., and Allen, A. (1999). “Regression Model for Resilient Modulus of Subgrade Soil,” Transportation Research Record 1687, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

141.    Titus-Glover, L., Mallela, J., Jiang, J., Ayres, M.E., and Shami, H.I. (2001). Assessment of Selected LTPP Material Data Tables and Development of Representative Test Tables, Report No. FHWA-RD-02-001, Federal Highway Administration, Washington DC.

142.    Federal Highway Administration (2010). Long-Term Pavement Performance Program—Standard Data Release 24.0, VR2010.0, DVD Version, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

143.    Mallows, C.L. (1973). “Some Comments on CP,” Technometrics, 15(4), Alexandria, VA.

144.    Crawford, G., Gudimettla, J., and Tanesi, J. (2010). “Inter-Laboratory Study on Measuring Coefficient of Thermal Expansion of Concrete,” Paper 10-2068, Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington DC.

145.    Tanesi, J., Crawford, G., Nicolaescu, M., Meininger, R., Gudimettla, J. (2010). “How Will the New AASHTO T336-09 CTE Test Method Impact You?,” Paper 10-1631, Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board, Washington DC.

 


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
FHWA
United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration