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Publication Number: FHWA-RD-01-143
Date: October 2003

Distress Data Consolidation Final Report

Appendix A. Illustrationof Various Discrepancies

Figure 5. Offsetting discrepancies between fatigue and longitudinal cracking noted on survey of January 1996.

a. Fatigue discrepancy noted in survey of January 1996.

Graph: Fatigue discrepancy noted in survey of January 1996. Click here for more detail

b. Discrepancies for longitudinal cracking in the wheel path noted in surveys of August 1991 and January 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies for longitudinal cracking in the wheel path noted in surveys of August 1991 and January 1996. Click here for more detail.


Figure 6. Illustration of offsetting discrepancies in longitudinal cracking caused by lack of distinction between wheel path and non-wheel path cracking

a. Discrepancy in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path noted in May 1991 survey.

Graph: Discrepancy in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path noted in May 1991 survey. Click here for more detail

b. Discrepancy in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking noted in May 1991 survey.

Graph: Discrepancy in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking noted in May 1991 survey. Click here for more detail.


Figure 7. Illustration of discrepancy caused by lack of distinction between block cracking and transverse and longitudinal cracking.

a. Discrepancies noted in block cracking in surveys of March 1993 and April 1996

Graph: Discrepancies noted in block cracking in surveys of March 1993 and April 1996

b. No discrepancies noted in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path.

Graph: No discrepancies noted in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path.

c. Discrepancies noted in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking noted on August 1989, March 1993, and April 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies noted in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking noted on August 1989, March 1993, and April 1996.

d. Discrepancies noted in number of transverse cracks noted on August 1989, March 1993, and April 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies noted in number of transverse cracks noted on August 1989, March 1993, and April 1996.

e. Discrepancies noted in length of transverse cracking.

Graph: Discrepancies noted in length of transverse cracking

Figure 8. Illustration of discrepancy in length of transverse cracks caused by a summarization error.

a. No discrepancy noted in number of transverse cracks.

Graph: No discrepancy noted in number of transverse cracks

b. Discrepancy in length of transverse cracks in survey of June 1988.

Graph: Discrepancy in length of transverse cracks in survey of June 1988


Figure 9. Illustration of discrepancy in area of patching caused by summarization error.

a. Discrepancies in number of patches noted in surveys of September 1993 and May 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies in number of patches noted in surveys of September 1993 and May 1996

b. Patch area in survey of May 1996 greater than 15 percent of total surface area of section.

Graph: Patch area in survey of May 1996 greater than 15 percent of total surface area of section.

Figure 10. Illustration of discrepancy caused by lack of distinction between wheel path and non-wheel path longitudinal cracking in PADIAS 1.x data.

a. Discrepancy noted in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path in the PADIAS 1.x survey of November 1991.

Graph: longitudinal cracking in the wheel path in the PADIAS 1.x. Click here for more detail.

b. Discrepancies noted in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking for all PADIAS 1.x surveys.

Graph: non-wheel path longitudinal cracking for all PADIAS 1.x. Click here for more detail.

Figure 11. Illustration of discrepancy caused by insufficient quantities of distress on an asphalt-surfaced section.

Graph: insufficient quantities of distress on  an asphalt-surfaced section. Click here for more detail.

Figure 12. Illustration of discrepancy caused by insufficient quantities of distress on a jointed concrete-surfaced section.

Graph: Illustration of discrepancy caused by insufficient quantities of distress on a jointed concrete-surfaced section. Click here for more detail.

Figure 13. Illustration of discrepancy caused by insufficient quantities of distress on a continuously reinforced concrete-surfaced section.

Graph: Illustration of discrepancy caused by insufficient quantities of distress on  a continuously reinforced concrete-surfaced section. Click here for more detail.

Figure 14. Illustration of discrepancy caused by an exponential growth rate.

Graph: Illustration of discrepancy caused by an exponential growth rate. Click here for more details.

Figure 15. Illustration of discrepancy caused by an undocumented maintenance or rehabilitation event.

a. Discrepancy noted in fatigue cracking in survey of August 1996.

Graph: Discrepancy noted in fatigue cracking in survey of August 1996. Click here for more details.

b. Discrepancy noted in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path in the survey of August 1996.

Graph: Discrepancy noted in longitudinal cracking in the wheel path in the survey of August 1996. Click here for more details.

c. Discrepancy noted in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking in survey of August 1996.

Graph: Discrepancy noted in non-wheel path longitudinal cracking in survey of August 1996. Click here for more details.

d. Discrepancies noted in number of transverse cracks in surveys of October 1995 and August 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies noted in number of transverse cracks in surveys of October 1995 and August 1996 Click here for more details.

e. Discrepancies noted in length of transverse cracks in surveys of October 1995 and August 1996.

Graph: Discrepancies noted in length of transverse cracks in surveys of October 1995 and August 1996. Click here for more details.

f. Discrepancy noted in block cracking in survey of August 1996

Discrepancy noted in block cracking in survey of August 1996. Click here for more details.

 

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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