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This report is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
Publication Number: FHWA-RD-03-088
Date: November 2003

Introduction to The LTPP Information Management System (IMS)

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A.1 GENERAL

America's Highways, Accelerating the Search for Innovation, Special Report 202, TRB, National Research Council, June 1984.

Data Collection Guide for Long-Term Pavement Performance Studies, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, revised October 1993.

Fulfilling the Promise of Better Roads, A Report of the TRB Long-Term Pavement Performance Committee, TRB, 2001.

An Investment Benefiting America's Highways, The Long-Term Pavement Performance Program, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, 2001.

LTPP Product Plan, Publication No. FHWA-RD-01-086, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, 2001.

SHRP-LTPP Overview: Five-Year Report, Publication No. SHRP-P-416, SHRP, National Research Council, June 1994.

Strategic Highway Research Program, Research Plans, Final Report, TRB, National Research Council, National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP), May 1986.

Strategic Highway Research Program, Saving Lives, Reducing Congestion, Improving Quality of Life, Special Report 260, TRB, National Research Council, 2001.

A.2 PAVEMENT MONITORING

Analysis of Pavement Homogeneity, Non-Representative Test Pit and Section Data, and Structural Capacity, FWDCHECK, Version 2.0, Volume I: Technical Report, Volume 2: Users Guide, Publication Nos. SHRP-P-633 and SHRP-P-634, SHRP, National Research Council, January 1991.

Calibration of Reference Load Cell, Software User's Guide and Instruction Manual, LDCELCAL, Version 1.7, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1993.

Distress Identification Manual for the Long-Term Pavement Performance Studies, Operational Guide No. SHRP-LTPP-OG-001, SHRP, National Research Council, 1993.

Falling Weight Deflectometer, Relative Calibration Analysis, FWDCAL, Version 2.00, Program Manual, SHRP, National Research Council, April 1992.

Falling Weight Deflectometer, Relative Calibration Analysis, RELCAL, Version 3.00, Program Manual, SHRP, National Research Council, May 1994.

Guidelines for Users of the SHRP FWD Calibration Centers, Publication No. FHWA-SA-95-038, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1994.

Long-Term Pavement Performance PROQUAL User's Documentation, Version 2.08, FHWA, June 1998.

LTPP Manual for Profile Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 3.1, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1999.

LTPP Manual for Falling Weight Deflectometer Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 2.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, February 1993.

LTPP Manual for Falling Weight Deflectometer Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 3.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, January 2000.

TPP Manual for Falling Weight Deflectometer Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 2.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, February 1993.

LTPP Manual for Falling Weight Deflectometer Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 3.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, January 2000.

LTPP Manual for Falling Weight Deflectometer Measurements, Operational Field Guidelines, Version 3.1, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, LTPP Division, August 2000.

Manual for Profile Measurement: Operational Field Guidelines, Publication No. SHRP-P-378, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1994.

PROQUAL, Version 1.4, User Documentation, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1992.

Reference Calibration of Falling-Weight Deflectometers, Software User's Guide and Instruction Manual, FWDREFCAL, Version 3.72, SHRP, National Research Council, March 1994.

SHRP/LTPP FWD Calibration Protocol, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1994.

Study of LTPP Distress Data Variability, Volumes I and II, Report Nos. FHWA-RD-99-074 and FHWA-RD-99-075, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1999.

A.3 MATERIALS SAMPLING AND TESTING

SHRP-LTPP Guide for Field Materials Sampling, Handling, and Testing, Operational Guide No. SHRP-LTPP-OG-006, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1991.

SHRP-LTPP Interim Guide for Laboratory Materials Handling and Testing, Operational Guide No. SHRP-LTPP-OG-004, SHRP, National Research Council, November 1989, revised July 1997.

A.4 SEASONAL MONITORING PROGRAM

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: MOBFIELD Users Guide, Version 2.4, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: MOBFIELD Users Guide, Version 3.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1999.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: ONSFIELD Users Guide, Version 1.2, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: ONSFIELD Users Guide, Version 2.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1999.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: SMPCheck Users Guide, Version 2.5, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: SMPCheck Users Guide, Version 5.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 2000.

A.5 GPS EXPERIMENTS

Recruitment Guidelines for Additional GPS Candidate Projects, SHRP, National Research Council, October 1988.

 

A.6 SPS EXPERIMENTS

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Participation Requirements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-005R, SHRP, National Research Council, July 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Pavement Layering Methodology, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1994.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-1 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-017, SHRP, National Research Council, December 1990, revised FHWA, December 1993.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-1 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-026, SHRP, National Research Council, December 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-1 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, revised February 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-1 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-008, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-1 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised January 1994.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-2 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-018, SHRP, National Research Council, 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-2 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-028, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-2 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, April 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-2 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-009, SHRP, National Research Council, April 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-2 , Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised June 1994.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-3 , Maintenance Effectiveness for Asphalt Concrete Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, June 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-4 , Maintenance Effectiveness for Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, November 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-5 , Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-012, SHRP, National Research Council, June 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-5 , Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-015, SHRP, National Research Council, October 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-5 , Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, April 1989.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-5 , Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-006, SHRP, National Research Council, November 1989.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-5 , Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-014, SHRP, National Research Council, October 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-6 , Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-013, SHRP, National Research Council, July 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-6 , Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-023, SHRP, National Research Council, May 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-6 , Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, November 1989.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-6 , Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-007, SHRP, National Research Council, November 1989.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-6 , Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-019, SHRP, National Research Council, January 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-7 , Bonded Portland Cement Concrete Overlays, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-016, SHRP, National Research Council, December 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-7 , Bonded Portland Cement Concrete Overlays, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-024, SHRP, National Research Council, July 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-7 , Bonded Portland Cement Concrete Overlays, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-7 , Bonded Portland Cement Concrete Overlays, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-011, SHRP, National Research Council, June 1990.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-7 , Bonded Portland Cement Concrete Overlays, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-020, SHRP, National Research Council, January 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-8 , Study of Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-029, SHRP, National Research Council, March 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Data Collection Guidelines for Experiment SPS-8 , Study of Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-031, SHRP, National Research Council, September 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-8 , Study of Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, SHRP, National Research Council, August 1991.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-8 , Study of Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, Operational Memorandum No. SHRP-LTPP-OM-030, SHRP, National Research Council, August 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-8 , Study of Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised October 1997.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-9 , Validation of SHRP Asphalt Specifications and Mix Design and Innovations in Asphalt Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-9 , Validation of SHRP Asphalt Specifications and Mix Design and Innovations in Asphalt Pavements, SHRP, National Research Council, February 1992.

Specific Pavement Studies , Construction Guidelines for Experiment SPS-9 A, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1995.

Specific Pavement Studies , Experimental Design and Research Plan for Experiment SPS-9 A, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1995.

Specific Pavement Studies , Guidelines for Nomination and Evaluation of Candidate Projects for Experiment SPS-9 A, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1994.

Specific Pavement Studies , Materials Sampling and Testing Requirements for Experiment SPS-9 A, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

A.7 TRAFFIC DATA

Flexible Pavement Load Equivalency Factors (LEF) Based on Structural Number Estimates Using the SHRP-LTPP IMS Inventory Data, Tech Memo No. AU-167, November 1990.

Guide to LTPP Traffic Data Collection and Processing, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 2001.

Load Equivalency Factors (LEF) Estimates for GPS-LTPP Rigid Pavements Based on SHRP-LTPP IMS Inventory Data, Tech Memo No. AU-168, November 1990.

Long-Term Pavement Performance Program Protocol for Calibrating Traffic Data Collection Equipment, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1998.

LTPP Traffic Database Librarian Software, Version 4.0, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1997.

LTPP Traffic QC Software, Technical Documentation, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, 1997.

LTPP Traffic Software Technical Documentation, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1997.

LTPP Traffic Software Users Guide, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

Managing Purge Documents Using Purge Operations Software, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1998.

Revised Data Collection Plan for LTPP Sites, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1998.

Running the Level 4 Traffic Quality Control Filter Program, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

Traffic Analysis Software, Volume 1: User's Guide, FHWA, Office of Infrastructure Research, Development, and Technology, August 2002.

Users Manual for Level 3 Through 1LTPP Traffic Quality Control Software, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1997.

A.8 CLIMATIC DATA 

Climate Data Collection Plan for SPS Test Sites, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1993, revised May 1993.

LTPP Climatic Database Revision and Expansion, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1999.

LTPP-SPS Automated Weather Stations: Automated Weather Station (AWS) Installation, Arizona DOT Open House, Phoenix, AZ, July 20-21, 1994.

LTPP-SPS Automated Weather Stations: AWSCheck Users Guide, Version 1.1, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1996.

LTPP-SPS Automated Weather Stations: AWSScan Program Background and Users Guide, Version 1.11, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

A.9 DYNAMIC LOAD RESPONSE DATA

Development of an Instrumentation Plan for the Ohio SPS Test Pavement, Final Report, Publication No. DEL-23-17.48, Ohio DOT and FHWA, October 1994.

SPS-2 Seasonal and Load Response Instrumentation, North Carolina DOT Open House, Lexington, NC, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 9-11, 1994.

A.10 SITE REPORTS

A.10.1 SPS Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plans

The SPS materials sampling, field testing, and laboratory testing plans are very valuable sources of information for data users who want to interpret the materials data collected at SPS sites. Unlike the GPS materials sampling and testing plans, which are relatively uniform from site to site, the sampling plans for SPS sites vary substantially between sites since they are tailored to site conditions, construction sequence, test section sequence, etc. For example, to compute certain material properties, the test results from samples obtained at different test sections must be combined.

A.10.1.1 North Atlantic Region

Report of Site Investigation on Delaware SPS-2 Problem Test Sections, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1995.

Revised Materials Sampling and Testing Plans SPS-2 , US 113, SBL, Delaware, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1994.

Revised Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, SPS-2 , US 52 SB, Lexington, By-Pass, North Carolina, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1995.

SPS-5 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 230500, I-95 NB, Argyle, Maine, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1994.

SPS-5 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 240500, US-15 NB, Frederick, Maryland, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1992.

SPS-5 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 340500, I-195 WB, Imlaystown, New Jersey, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1994.

SPS-6 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 420600, I-80 WB, Centre County, Pennsylvania, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1994.

SPS-8 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 340800, Port Authority of NY/NJ, JFK Airport, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1994.

SPS-8 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 360800, Lake Ontario State Parkway, Brockport, New York, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

SPS-8 Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 370800, SR 1245, Jacksonville, North Carolina, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised August and October 1997.

SPS-9 Pilot, Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 240900, I-70 WB, Frederick, Maryland, Memo, July and September 1992.

SPS-9 A Materials Sampling and Testing Plan Revisions, Connecticut, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1997.

Revised SPS-9 A Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 340900, I-195 EB, Allentown, New Jersey, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1997, revised May 1998.

SPS-9 A Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 370900, NB/SB, Sanford, North Carolina, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised February and June 1997.

SPS-9 A Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Project 870900, Hwy. 17 WB, Petawawa, Ontario, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised May 1997.

SPS-9 A Materials Sampling and Testing Plans, Projects 890900, NR 170 WB, and 89A900, NR 170 EB, Jonquiere, Quebec, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, revised February 1997.

A.10.1.2 North Central Region

As-Sampled, Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-1 Experimental Project, US-27 Southbound, Clinton County, Michigan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-1 Experimental Project, US-27 Southbound, Clinton County, Michigan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-1 Experimental Project, STH 29, Marathon County, Wisconsin, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, updated July 1997.

Mix Designs and Summary of Concrete Test Results, SPS-2 I-70 Westbound, Kansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1993.

Summary of Test Run at the Kansas SPS-2 Project in 1992, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1993.

As-Sampled Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-2 Experimental Project, US-23 Northbound, Monroe County, Michigan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-2 Experimental Project, Westbound and Eastbound, Marathon County, Wisconsin, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, updated July 1997.

Sampling, Testing, and Monitoring Activities, SPS-5 , Plan for Test Sections Located on Highway 1 Westbound Near Brokenhead River, Manitoba, Canada, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1989.

As-Sampled Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Ramp A, Delaware County, Ohio, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1995.

Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Ramp A, Delaware County, Ohio, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1994.

Draft Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Apple Lane, Marathon County, Wisconsin, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, updated July 1997.

Work Plan, Materials Sampling and Testing, Missouri SPS-9 A, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, updated July 1996.

Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-9 A Experimental Project, US-23 Southbound, Delaware County, Ohio, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, SPS-9 A, Highway 16 (Yellowhead Highway), Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1996.

A.10.1.3 Southern Region

Sampling and Testing Plan for SPS-1 Test Site in Alabama, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1992.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Arkansas SPS-1 Project 050100, US-63 NBL, Craighead County, Arkansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1993.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Florida SPS-1 Project 120100, US-27 SBL, Palm Beach County, Florida, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1996.

Laboratory Materials Testing for LTPP SPS-1 Project 2201, US-171, Calcasiu Parish, Louisiana, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1995.

Louisiana SPS-1 (220100), Revised Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1993, revised December 1993.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, New Mexico SPS-1 Project 350100, IH-25 NBL, Dona Ana County, New Mexico, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Oklahoma SPS-1 Project 400100, US-62 EBL, Comanche County, Oklahoma, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1996.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Texas SPS-1 Project 480100, US-281 SBL, Hidalgo County, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1996.

Arkansas SPS-2 (050200), Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Arkansas SPS-2 Project 050200, IH-30 WBL, Hot Spring County, Arkansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1997.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Alabama SPS-5 Project 010500, US-84 EBL, Houston County, Alabama, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1996.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Florida SPS-5 Project 120500, US-1 SBL, Martin County, Florida, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1994.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Georgia SPS-5 Project 130500, IH-75 SBL, Bartow County, Georgia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1993.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, New Mexico SPS-5 Project 350500, IH-10 EBL, Grant County, New Mexico, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Oklahoma SPS-5 Project 400500, US-62 WBL, Comanche County, Oklahoma, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1996.

Sampling, Testing, and Monitoring Activities, Specific Pavement Studies -Experiment 5, Rehabilitation of Asphaltic Concrete Pavements, Plan for Test Sections, SHRP, National Research Council, July 1989.

Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan for SPS Section 48A5 in Kaufman, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1990.

Alabama SPS-6 Project (010600), Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1998.

Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan, Arkansas SPS-6 Project 05A6, US-65 Southbound, Jefferson County, Arkansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan, Oklahoma SPS-6 Project 4006, IH-35 Southbound, Kay County, Oklahoma, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1992.

Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan, Tennessee SPS-6 Project 4706, IH-40 Westbound, Madison County, Tennessee, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1995.

Materials Sampling and Field Testing Plan, Louisiana SPS-7 Project 2207, IH-10 Eastbound, Ascension Parish, Louisiana, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1991.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Arkansas SPS-8 Project 050800, US-65 East Terminal Interchange, Right Frontage Road, Jefferson County, Arkansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1996.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Mississippi SPS-8 Project 280800, SR-315 NBL, Panola County, Mississippi, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, New Mexico SPS-8 Project 350800, Grant County, New Mexico, IH-10 Frontage Road Eastbound, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Texas SPS-8 Project 480800, FM-2223 EBL, Brazos County, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Texas SPS-8 Project 48A800, FM-2670, Bell County, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 2000.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Arkansas SPS-9 A Project 050900, US-65 Southbound, Jefferson County, Arkansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Florida SPS-9 A Project 120900, Columbia County, Florida, IH-10 Eastbound, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1996.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Mississippi SPS-9 A Project 280900, Panola County, Mississippi, IH-55 Southbound, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, New Mexico SPS-9 A Project 350900, Grant County, New Mexico, IH-10 Eastbound, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1995.

Materials Sampling and Testing Plan, Texas SPS-9 A Project 480900, Bexar County, Texas, Loop 1604 Southbound, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1995.

A.10.1.4 Western Region

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-1 Experimental Project, Federal Aid Project No. F-39-1-509, State Highway No. US-93, Mohave County, Arizona, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1993.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-1 and SPS-2 Experimental Projects, Interstate Highway No. I-80, Humboldt and Lander Counties, Nevada, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1994.

Addendum to Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-1 and SPS-2 Experimental Projects, Interstate Highway No. I-80, Humboldt and Lander Counties, Nevada, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1995.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-1 and SPS-9 Experimental Projects, I-15, Cascade County, Montana, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1997.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-2 Experimental Project, Federal Aid Project No. IR-10-2(146), Ehrenberg-Phoenix State Highway, Maricopa County, Arizona, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1993.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-2 Experiment Project, Federal Aid Project No. ACNH-P099(370)Y, SR 99 at and Near Delhi and Various Locations, Merced County, California, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1999.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-2 Experimental Project, Federal Aid Project No. ACDPS-0027(001), 395-Lind to Ritzvile, Washington, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1993.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-2 and SPS-8 Experimental Projects, Federal Aid Project No. I 076-1(138), State Highway No. I-76, Adams County, Colorado, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1992.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-8 Experimental Project (Flexible and Rigid), Federal Aid Project No. ACNH-P099(370)Y, Sycamore Street, Delhi, Merced County, California, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1999.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Federal Aid Project No. RS 273-1(2)0, State Highway No. RS 273, Deerlodge County, Montana, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1994.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Utah Forest Highway and Federal Lands Highway Project 5-2(3), State Highway 35 (Wolf Creek Road), Wasatch County, Utah, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-8 Experimental Project, Project Nos. PFH 176-1(1) and RS-A070(002), North Touchet Road, Columbia County, Washington, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

Materials Sampling, Field Testing, and Laboratory Testing Plan, Strategic Highway Research Program, SPS-8 Experimental Project (Rigid), Project No. CRP 93-13, Smith Springs Road, Walla Walla County, Washington, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1999.

A.10.2 SPS Construction Reports

The SPS construction reports provide data users with site-specific information and notes on the general layout of the site, site features, construction problems, nonstandard construction features, and other information not easily captured on the data sheets.

A.10.2.1 North Atlantic Region

Construction Report on SHRP 100100, SPS-1 Project, Ellendale, Delaware, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-10-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

Construction Report on LTPP 510100, SPS-1 Project, Danville, Virginia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

Construction Report on LTPP 100200, SPS-2 Project, Ellendale, Delaware, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-10-04, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1996.

Report of Site Investigation on Delaware SPS-2 Problem Test Sections, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1995.

Construction Report on LTPP 370200, SPS-2 Project, Lexington, North Carolina, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1994.

Construction Report on LTPP 24A300, SPS-3 Project, Ocean City, Maryland, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 36A300 and 36B300, SPS-3 Projects, Glen Falls and Cranberry Lake, New York, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 42A300 and 42B300, SPS-3 Projects, Lewisburg and Knoxville, Pennsylvania, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 51A300, SPS-3 Project, Petersburg, Virginia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 87A300 and 87B300, SPS-3 Projects, Moonstone and Bracebridge, Ontario, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 89A300, SPS-3 Project, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, 1990.

Construction Report on LTPP 230500, SPS-5 Project, Argyle, Maine, Publication No. FHWA-TS-95-23-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1995.

Construction Report on LTPP 240500, SPS-5 Project, Frederick, Maryland, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1993.

Construction Report on LTPP 340500, SPS-5 Project, Imlaystown, New Jersey, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1994.

Construction Report on LTPP 420600, SPS-6 Project, Snowshoe, Pennsylvania, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1995.

Construction Report on LTPP 340800, SPS-8 Project, NY/NJ, JFK Airport, Port Authority, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-34-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1994.

Construction Report on LTPP 360800, SPS-8 Project, Lake Ontario State Parkway, Brockport, New York, Publication No. FHWA-TS-95-36-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

Construction Report on LTPP 370800, SPS-8 Project, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Publication No. FHWA-TS-98-37-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1998.

Construction Report on LTPP 240900, SPS-9 Project, Frederick, Maryland, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1992.

Construction Report on LTPP 090900, SPS-9 A Project, Colchester, Connecticut, Publication No. FHWA-TS-98-09-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1998.

Construction Report on LTPP 340900, SPS-9 A Project, Allentown, New Jersey, Publication No. FHWA-TS-00-34-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 2000.

Construction Report on LTPP 370900, SPS-9 A Project, NB and SB, Sanford, North Carolina, Publication No. FHWA-TS-00-37-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 2000.

Construction Report on LTPP 870900, SPS-9 A Project, Petawawa, Ontario, Publication No. FHWA-TS-98-87-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1998.

Construction Report on LTPP 890900 and 89A900, SPS-9 A Projects, Jonquiere, Quebec, Publication No. FHWA-TS-98-89-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1998.

A.10.2.2 North Central Region

SPS-1 Construction Report, US-54 Near Fort Madison, Iowa, Sections 190101 to 190112, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1994.

SPS-1 Construction Report, US-54 Near Greensburg, Kansas, Sections 200101 to 200164, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1994.

SPS-1 Construction Report, U.S. Highway 81 Southbound, 80 Miles Southwest of Lincoln, Nebraska, (4 Miles) North of the Kansas Border, Sections 310113 to 310124, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-1 Construction Report, U.S. Highway 23 Southbound, Delaware County, Ohio, Sections 390101 to 390112, 390159, and 390160, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

SPS-1 Construction Report, STH 29 Westbound, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Sections 550113 to 550124, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 2000.

SPS-2 Construction Report, US-65 Northbound, Polk County, Iowa, Sections 190213 to 190224, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-2 Construction Report, I-70 Near Abilene, Kansas, Sections 200201 to 200212, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1993.

SPS-2 Construction Report, US 23 Northbound, Monroe County, Michigan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1995.

SPS-2 Construction Report, I-94 Eastbound, West of Fargo, North Dakota, Sections 380213 to 380224, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-2 Construction Report, U.S. Highway 23 Northbound, Delaware County, Ohio, Sections 390201 to 390212 and 390259 to 390265, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

SPS-2 Construction Report, STH 29 Westbound, Marathon County, Wisconsin, Sections 550213 to 550224 and 550259 to 550266, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1999.

SPS-5 Construction Report, Trunk Highway 2 Westbound, 14 Miles West of Bemidji, Minnesota, Core Sections 270501 to 270509 and Supplemental Sections 270559 to 270561, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-5 Construction Report, PTH No. 1 Westbound, 35 Miles East of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Sections 830501 to 830509, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-6 Construction Report, I-35 Southbound, Between Ames and Des Moines, Iowa, Test Sections 190601 to 190608, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-6 Construction Report, US-10 Eastbound, Bay County, Michigan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1995.

SPS-6 Construction Report, US Highway 12 Westbound, Approximately 15 Miles East of Aberdeen, South Dakota, Test Sections 460601 to 460608, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-7 Construction Report, I-35 Near Ames, Iowa, Sections 190701 to 190710, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1994.

SPS-7 Construction Report, Interstate 94 Eastbound, Between Moorhead and Barnesville, Minnesota, Sections 270701 to 270709, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

Construction Report for SPS-7 , Route 67 Northbound, Jefferson County, Missouri, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1995.

Construction Report for SPS-8 , Ramp A, Delaware County, Ohio, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1995.

SPS-8 South Dakota, Construction Report, State Highway 1804, Pollock, South Dakota, Sections 460803 and 460804, Supplemental Section 460859, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-9 Construction Report, US-54 Near Greensburg, Kansas, Sections 200901 to 200903, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1993.

SPS-9 Construction Report, US-169, Near Belle Plaine, Minnesota, Sections 270901 to 270903, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1995.

SPS-9 Construction Report, I-94 Near Tomah, Wisconsin, Sections 550901 to 550909, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

SPS-9 Construction Report, I-43 Near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Sections 55A901 to 55A909 and Sections 55B901 to 55B909, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

SPS-9 A Construction Report, U.S. 65 Southbound, Sedalia, Missouri, Sections 290901 to 290903 and 290959 to 290964, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

SPS-9 A Construction Report, U.S. Highway 81 Southbound, 80 Miles Southwest of Lincoln, Nebraska, (4 Miles) North of the Kansas Border, Sections 310901 to 310903, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

SPS-9 A Construction Report, Yellow Head Highway Westbound, Radisson, Saskatchewan, Sections 900901 to 900903 and 900959 to 900962, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

A.10.2.3 Southern Region

Southern Region SPS Tour, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1995.

SPS-1 Project 0101, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-280 Westbound, Lee County, Alabama, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

SPS-1 Project 0501, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-63 Northbound, Craighead County, Arkansas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1996.

SPS-1 Project 1201, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-27 Southbound, Palm Beach County, Florida, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1996.

SPS-1 Project 2201, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-171 Northbound, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1998.

SPS-1 Project 3501, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, IH-25 Northbound, Dona Ana County, New Mexico, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

SPS-1 Project 4001, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-62 Eastbound, Comanche County, Oklahoma, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1998.

SPS-1 Project 4801, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements, US-281 Southbound, Hidalgo County, Texas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1997.

SPS-2 Project 0502, Strategic Study of Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements, I-30 Westbound, Hot Springs County, Arkansas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1997.

Report on the SPS-3 Experiment of the Long-Term Pavement Performance Project in the Southern Region, Publication No. FHWA-IF-00-026, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 2000.

SPS-3 Construction Report, SHRP Southern Region Coordination Office, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1991.

SPS-4 Construction Report, SHRP Southern Region Coordination Office, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1991.

SPS-5 Project 0105, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, US-84 Eastbound, Houston County, Alabama, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1996.

SPS-5 Project 1205, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, US-1 Southbound, Martin County, Florida, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

SPS-5 Project 1305, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, IH-75 Southbound, Bartow County, Georgia, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

SPS-5 Project 2805, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, IH-55 Northbound, Yazoo County, Mississippi, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1993.

SPS-5 Project 3505, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, IH-10 Eastbound, Grant County, New Mexico, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

SPS-5 Project 4005, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study, US-62 Westbound, Comanche County, Oklahoma, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1998.

SPS-5 Project 4805, Asphalt Rehabilitation Study on US-175 in Kaufman County, Texas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1992.

SPS-6 Project 0106, Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, I-59 Southbound, Etowah County, Alabama, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1999.

SPS-6 Project 05A6, Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, US-65 Southbound, Jefferson County, Arkansas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1997.

SPS-6 Project 4006, Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, IH-35 Southbound, Kay County, Oklahoma, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1993.

SPS-6 Project 4706, Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, IH-40 Westbound, Madison County, Tennessee, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1997.

SPS-7 Project 2207, Bonded Concrete Overlay of a Concrete Pavement, IH-10 Eastbound, Ascension Parish, Louisiana, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1993.

SPS-8 Project 0508, Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, US-65 East Terminal Interchange, Right Frontage Road, Jefferson County, Arkansas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1998.

SPS-8 Project 2808, Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, SR-315 Westbound, Panola County, Mississippi, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1998.

SPS-8 Project 3508, Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, IH-10 Frontage Road, Grant County, New Mexico, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

SPS-8 Project 4808, Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, FM-2223 Eastbound, Brazos County, Texas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1996.

SPS-8 Project 48A8, Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads, FM-2670 Eastbound, Bell County, Texas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 2000.

SPS-9 A Project 0509, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, US-65 Southbound, Pulaski County, Arkansas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1997.

SPS-9 A Project 1209, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, IH-10 Eastbound, Columbia County, Florida, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1997.

SPS-9 A Project 2809, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, IH-55 Southbound, Panola County, Mississippi, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1996.

SPS-9 A Project 3509, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, IH-10 Eastbound, Grant County, New Mexico, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

SPS-9 A Project 4809, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, FM-1604 Southbound, Bexar County, Texas, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

A.10.2.4 Western Region 

Construction Report on Site 040200, Interstate Highway No. I-10, Maricopa County, Arizona, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1994.

Construction Report on Site 040500, Interstate Highway No. I-8, Casa Grande, Arizona, Final Report, Arizona Transportation Research Center, Arizona DOT, October 1990.

Construction Report on Site 040600, Interstate Highway No. I-40, Flagstaff, Arizona, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 1992.

Construction Report on Site 040900/04A900, U.S. 93, Arizona Department of Transportation, Kingman, Arizona, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1997.

Construction Report on Site 060200, SR 99, Delhi, California, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 2002.

Construction Report on Site 060500, Interstate 40, California Department of Transportation, Barstow, California, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

Construction Report on Site 060600, Interstate Highway No. I-5, Mt. Shasta City, California, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1996.

Construction Report on Site 060800, Sycamore Street, Delhi, California, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 2002.

Construction Report on Site 06A800, Sycamore Street, Delhi, California, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 2002.

Construction Report on Site 080500, Interstate 70, Colorado Department of Transportation, Lincoln County, Colorado, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 1994.

Construction Report on Site 080800, Chestnut Street, Colorado Department of Transportation, Adams County, Colorado, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1998.

Construction Report on Site 300100, Interstate Highway 15, Cascade County, Montana, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, November 2002.

Construction Report on Site 300500, Interstate 90, Big Timber, Montana, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1992.

Construction Report on Site 300900, Interstate Highway 15, Cascade County, Montana, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 2002.

Construction Report on Site 320100, Interstate Highway No. I-80, Humboldt and Lander Counties, Nevada, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1998.

Construction Report on Site 320200, Interstate Highway No. I-80, Humboldt and Lander Counties, Nevada, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1998.

Construction Report on Site 300800, SR 273, Adams County, Washington, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1996.

Construction Report on Site 530200, SR 395, Adams County, Washington, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1997.

Construction Report on Site 530800, North Touchet Road, Dayton, Washington, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1997.

Construction Report on Site 53A800, Smith Springs Road, Clyde, Washington, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 2002.

Construction Report on Site 810500, Highway 16, Alberta Transportation and Utilities Department, Edson, Alberta, Final Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, July 1993.

Construction Report on Site 81A900, Highway 2, Alberta Transportation and Utilities Department, Okotoks, Alberta, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1997.

FHWA LTPP Specific Pavement Studies , Arizona SPS-1 , Construction Report on SHRP 040100, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, April 1995.

Investigation of Premature Distress in Asphalt Overlays on IH-70 in Colorado, Cooperative Applied Research between the Asphalt Institute and Colorado DOT, Denver, Colorado.

SPS-2 Construction Report, SHRP 080200, Federal Aid Project No. I 076-1 (138), I-76 Eastbound, Milepost 18.43, Adams County, Colorado, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

SPS-3 Construction Report, SHRP Western Region, Final Report, SHRP, National Research Council, December 1990.

SPS-8 Construction Report on Site 490800, State Route 35 (Wolf Creek Road), Utah, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1998.

SPS-9 A I-10 Westbound Milepost 112-123, Construction Report on Site 04B900, Arizona, Draft Report, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, August 1998.

A.10.3 SMP Installation Reports

The SMP site installation reports provide valuable information to analysts interested in the LTPP SMP data. Information contained in these reports includes: sensor installation, sensor check and calibration, site layout, problems during installation, nonstandard installation features, gravimetric moisture measurements taken during TDR installation, site photographs, and pavement layer structure in the instrumentation hole.

A.10.3.1 North Atlantic Region

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 091803, Groton, Connecticut, Publication No. FHWA-TS-95-09-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 100102, Ellendale, Delaware, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-10-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 231026, East Dixfield, Maine, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-23-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 241634, Ocean City, Maryland, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-24-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 251002, Chicopee, Massachusetts, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-25-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 331001, Concord, New Hampshire, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-33-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 360801 Hamlin, New York, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-36-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 364018, Oneonta, New York, Publication No. FHWA-TS-95-36-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, September 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Sections 370201, 370205, 370208, and 370212, Lexington, North Carolina, Publication No. FHWA-TS-97-37-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 371028, Elizabeth City, North Carolina, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-37-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 421606, Altoona, Pennsylvania, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-42-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 501002, New Haven, Vermont, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-50-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 510113, Danville, Virginia, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-51-03, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 510114, Danville, Virginia, Publication No. FHWA-TS-96-51-02, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 871622, Bracebridge, Ontario, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-87-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 893015, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, Publication No. FHWA-TS-94-89-01, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1996.

Seasonal Testing Instrumentation Pilot, GPS 361011, 1H 481 SB, E. Syracuse, New York, SHRP, National Research Council, October 1991.

A.10.3.2 North Central Region

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 183002 (18A), Lafayette, Indiana, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 204054 (20A), Enterprise, Kansas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 271018 (27A), Little Falls, Minnesota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 271028 (27B), Detroit Lakes, Minnesota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 274040 (27D), Grand Rapids, Minnesota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 276251 (27C), Bemidji, Minnesota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for SPS Section 310114 (31A), Hebron, Nebraska, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 313018 (31B), Kearney, Nebraska, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for SPS Section 460804 (46A), Pollock, South Dakota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 469187 (46B), Faith, South Dakota, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 831801 (83A), Oak Lake, Manitoba, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 833802 (83B), Glenea, Manitoba, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program, Site Installation Report for GPS Section 906405 (90A), Plunkett, Saskatchewan, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1996.

A.10.3.3 Southern Region

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 010102, Opelika, Alabama, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 131005, Warner Robins, Georgia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 131031, Dawsonville, Georgia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 133019, Gainesville, Georgia, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 281016, Kosciusko, Mississippi, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 281802, Laurel, Mississippi, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1996.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 351112, Hobbs, New Mexico, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 404165, Cleo Springs, Oklahoma, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 481060, Victoria, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 481068, Paris, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 481077, Estelline, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 481122, Floresville, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 483739, Kingsville, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 484142, Jasper, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1995.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 484143, Beaumont, Texas, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, March 1995.

A.10.3.4 Western Region

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 040113, Kingman, Arizona, Publication No. FHWA-04-0113, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 040114, Kingman, Arizona, Publication No. FHWA-04-0114, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 040215, Kingman, Arizona, Publication No. FHWA-04-0215, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 041024, Flagstaff, Arizona, Publication No. FHWA-04-1024, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 063042, Lodi, California, Publication No. FHWA-06-3042, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 081053, Delta, Colorado, Publication No. FHWA-08-1053, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, January 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 161010, Idaho Falls, Idaho, Publication No. FHWA-16-1010, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 300114, Great Falls, Montana, Publication No. FHWA-30-0114, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, October 2001.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 320101, Battle Mountain, Nevada, Publication No. FHWA-32-0101, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 320204, Battle Mountain, Nevada, Publication No. FHWA-32-0204, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, June 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 491001, Bluff, Utah, Publication No. FHWA-49-1001, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 493011, Nephi, Utah, Publication No. FHWA-49-3011, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 533813, Camas, Washington, Publication No. FHWA-53-3813, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, May 1997.

LTPP Seasonal Monitoring Program: Site Installation and Initial Data Collection, Section 561007, Cody, Wyoming, Publication No. FHWA-56-1007, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, February 1994.

Seasonal Instrumentation Pilot Study, Instrumentation Installation, Section 163023 in Idaho, SHRP, May 1992.

Seasonal Instrumentation Pilot Study, Instrumentation Installation, Montana Section 308129, FHWA, Pavement Performance Division, December 1992.

APPENDIX B. EXPERIMENT DEFINITIONS

B.1 GPS EXPERIMENTS

B.1.1 GPS-1: Asphalt Concrete on Granular Base

Pavements in the GPS-1 experiment include a dense-graded hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) surface layer, with or without other HMAC layers, constructed over an untreated granular base or no base. One or more subbase layers may be present, but are not required. A treated subgrade is classified as a subbase layer. Full-depth AC pavements (defined as an HMAC surface layer combined with one or more subsurface HMAC layers beneath the surface layer, with a minimum total HMAC thickness of 152 mm (6 inches), placed directly on a treated or untreated subgrade) are also allowed in this study.

Seal coats or porous friction courses are allowed on the surface, but not in combination with each other (e.g., a porous friction course placed over a seal coat

is not acceptable). Seal coats are permissible on top of granular base layers. At least one layer of dense-graded HMAC is required, regardless of the existence of seal coats or porous friction courses.

B.1.2 GPS-2: Asphalt Concrete on Bound Base

Pavements in the GPS-2 experiment consist of a dense-graded HMAC surface layer, with or without other HMAC layers, placed over a bound base layer. Bound bases are defined as those in which the cementing action of the stabilizing material is used to improve the structural characteristics of the base material. Binder types used in the base include bituminous and nonbituminous (pozzolans, PCC, lime, etc.). One or more subbase layers can be present, but are not required. Seal coats or porous friction courses are permitted on the surface, but not in combination (e.g., a porous friction course placed over a seal coat is not acceptable).

B.1.3 GPS-3: Jointed Plain Concrete Pavement (JPCP)

Pavements in the GPS-3 experiment consist of jointed plain (i.e., unreinforced) PCC slabs placed over either stabilized or unbound granular base layer. One or more subbase layers can be present, but are not required. A seal coat (prime coat) is permissible just above a granular base layer. The joints can include either no load-transfer devices or smooth dowel bars; however, jointed slabs with load-transfer devices other than dowel bars are accepted in the study on a case-by-case basis only. Slabs placed directly on a treated or untreated subgrade are not acceptable.

B.1.4 GPS-4: Jointed Reinforced Concrete Pavement (JRCP)

Pavements in the GPS-4 experiment include jointed reinforced PCC pavements with doweled joints spaced less than 13 m (40 ft) apart. The PCC slab must rest on a base layer or on unstabilized coarse-grained subgrade soils. A base layer and one or more subbase layers may exist, but are not required. JRCP placed directly on a fine-grained soil/aggregate layer or fine-grained subgrades is excluded from this study. JRCP's without load-transfer devices or with devices other than smooth dowel bars at the joints are not acceptable.

B.1.5 GPS-5: Continuously Reinforced ConcretePavement (CRCP)

Pavements in the GPS-5 experiment include continuously reinforced PCC pavements placed directly on a base layer or on unstabilized coarse-grained subgrade. One or more subbase layers can exist, but are not required. A seal coat (prime coat) is permissible just above a granular base layer. CRCP placed directly on a fine-grained soil/aggregate layer or fine-grained subgrades is not acceptable.

B.1.6 GPS-6: Asphalt Concrete Overlay of Asphalt Concrete Pavement

Pavements in the GPS-6A, -6B, -6C, -6D, and -6S experiments include a dense-graded HMAC surface layer, with or without other HMAC layers, placed over an existing AC pavement.

The designation 6A refers to those sections that were overlaid prior to acceptance in the GPS program.

The 6B, 6C, 6D, and 6S designations refer to LTPP sections on which an overlay was placed after the section had been accepted into the LTPP program.

Seal coats or porous friction courses are allowed, but not in combination. Fabric interlayers and stress-absorbing membrane interlayers (SAMIs) are permitted between the original surface and the overlay . The total thickness of HMAC used in the overlay is required to be at least 25.4 mm (1.0 inch).

B.1.7 GPS-7: Rehabilitated Portland Cement Concrete Pavement

Pavements in the GPS-7A, -7B, -7C, -7D, -7F, -7R, and -7S experiments primarily consist of JPCP, JRCP, or CRCP pavements in which a dense-graded HMAC surface layer, with or without other HMAC surface layers, was constructed.

The exception is the 7R designation that was added to account for PCC pavement test sections rehabilitated using concrete pavement restoration techniques. (To date, no test sections have been designated as 7R.)

The designation 7A refers to sections that were overlaid prior to acceptance in the GPS program. The 7B, 7C, 7D, 7F, and 7S designations refer to those test sections on which an overlay

was placed after the section had been accepted into the LTPP program.

The PCC slab may rest on a combination of base and/or subbase layers. The existing concrete slab can also be placed directly on lime- or cement-treated, fine- or coarse-grained subbase or on untreated coarse-grained subgrade soil. Slabs placed directly on untreated fine-grained subgrade are not acceptable.

Seal coats or porous friction courses are permissible, but are not allowed in combination. Fabric interlayers and SAMIs are acceptable when placed between the original surface (concrete) and the overlay . Overlaid pavements involving aggregate interlayers and open-graded AC interlayers are not included in this study. The total thickness of HMAC used in the overlay is required to be at least 38 mm (1.5 inches).

B.1.8 GPS-9 : Unbound PCC Overlays of PCC

Pavements acceptable in the GPS-9 experiment include unbonded JPCP, JRCP, or CRCP overlays with a thickness of 129 mm (5 inches) or more placed over an existing JPCP, JRCP, or CRCP pavement. An interlayer used to prevent bonding of the existing slab and the overlay slab is required. The overlaid concrete pavement can rest on a base and/or subbase, or directly on the subgrade.

B.2 SPS EXPERIMENTS

The following definitions apply solely to the core sections within each experiment. Any supplemental sections constructed at each SPS project are based on the highway agency's research interests. These sections are not consistent from one agency to the next.

B.2.1 SPS-1 : Structural Factors for Flexible Pavements

The experiment on the structural factors for flexible pavements (SPS-1 ) examines the performance of specific AC-surfaced pavement structural factors under different environmental conditions. Pavements within SPS-1 must start with the original construction of the entire pavement structure or removal and complete reconstruction of an existing pavement. The pavement structural factors in this experiment include the in-pavement drainage

layer, surface thickness, base type, and base thickness. The experiment design stipulates a traffic loading level in the study lane in excess of 100,000 80-kN [GE16] (18-kip) ESALs per year. The combination of the study factors in this experiment results in 24 different pavement structures. The experiment is designed using a fractional factorial approach to enhance implementation practicality, permitting the construction of 12 test sections at one site and a complementary 12 test sections to be constructed at another site within the same climatic region on a similar subgrade type.

B.2.2 SPS-2 : Structural Factors for Rigid Pavements

The experiment on the structural factors for rigid pavements (SPS-2 ) examines the performance of specific JPCP structural factors under different environmental conditions. Pavements within SPS-2 must start with the original construction of the entire pavement structure or removal and complete reconstruction of an existing pavement. The pavement structural factors included in this experiment are in-pavement drainage layer, PCC surface thickness, base type, PCC flexural strength, and lane width. The experiment requires that all test sections be constructed with perpendicular doweled joints at 4.9-m (15-ft) spacing and stipulate a traffic loading level in the lane in excess of 200,000 ESALs /year. The experiment is designed using a fractional factorial approach to enhance implementation practicality, permitting the construction of 12 test sections at one site and a complementary 12 test sections to be constructed at another site within the same climatic region on a similar subgrade type.

B.2.3 SPS-3 : Preventive Maintenance Effectiveness of Flexible Pavements

The experiment on the preventive maintenance effectiveness of flexible pavements (SPS-3 ) examines the performance of four preventive maintenance treatments (crack seal, chip seal , slurry seal , and thin overlay ) on AC surface pavement sections within the four climatic regions on the two classes of subgrade soil. The experiment design stipulates that the effectiveness of each of the four treatments be evaluated independently. The effectiveness of combinations of treatments is not considered. Therefore, each test site includes four treated test sections in addition to a control section. In most cases, the control (or "do nothing") section is classified as a GPS test section.

B.2.4 SPS-4: Preventive Maintenance Effectiveness of Rigid Pavements

The experiment on the preventive maintenance effectiveness of rigid pavements (SPS-4 ) was designed to study the effects of crack/joint seal ing and undersealing on jointed PCC pavement structures. Both JRCP and JPCP are included in the study. Undersealing is included as an optional factor and is only performed on a section in which the need for undersealing is indicated. The experiment design stipulates that the effectiveness of each of the two treatments be evaluated independently. The effectiveness of combinations of treatments is not considered. Each test site includes two treated test sections and a control section. The treatment sections on joint-/crack-sealing test sites consist of one section in which all joints have no sealant and one in which a watertight seal is maintained on all cracks and joints.

B.2.5 SPS-5 : Rehabilitation of Asphalt Concrete Pavements

The experiment on the rehabilitation of AC pavements (SPS-5 ) examines the performance of eight combinations of AC overlays on existing AC-surfaced pavements. The rehabilitation treatment factors included in the study are the intensity of surface preparation, recycled versus virgin AC overlay mixture, and overlay thickness. The experiment design includes all four climatic regions and the condition of the existing pavement. The experiment design stipulates a traffic loading level in the study lane in excess of 100,000 80-kN (18-kip) ESALs /year.

B.2.6 SPS-6 : Rehabilitation of Jointed Portland Cement Concrete (JPCC) Pavements

The experiment on the rehabilitation of JPCC pavements (SPS-6 ) examines the performance of seven rehabilitation treatment options as a function of the climatic region, type of pavement (plain or reinforced), and the condition of the existing pavement. The rehabilitation methods include surface preparation (limited preparation or full concrete pavement restoration) with a 102-mm- (4-in-) thick AC overlay or without an overlay, crack/break and seat with two AC overlay thicknesses (102 or 203 mm (4 or 8 inches)), and limited surface preparation with a 102-mm- (4-in-) thick AC overlay with sawed and sealed joints.

B.2.7 SPS-7 : Bonded Concrete Overlays of Concrete Pavements  

The experiment on the bonded concrete overlays of concrete pavements (SPS-7 ) examines the performance of eight combinations of bonded PCC treatment alternatives as a function of the climatic region, pavement type (jointed or continuously reinforced), and the condition of the existing pavement. The rehabilitation treatment factors include combinations of surface preparation methods (cold milling plus sand-blasting and shot-blasting), bonding agents (neat cement grout or none), and overlay thicknesses (76 or 127 mm (3 or 5 in)). The experiment design stipulates a traffic loading level in the study lane in excess of 200,000 80-kN (18-kip) ESALs /year. Only four SPS-7 projects were constructed.

B.2.8 SPS-8 : Environmental Effects in the Absence of Heavy Loads

The experiment on the environmental effects in the absence of heavy loads (SPS-8 ) examines the effects of climatic factors in the four environmental regions and on the subgrade types (frost-susceptible, expansive, fine, and coarse) on pavement sections incorporating flexible and rigid pavement designs that are subjected to limited traffic loading. The experiment design requires either two flexible pavement or two rigid pavement structures to be constructed at each site. The two flexible pavement sections consist of a 102-mm (4-inch) AC surface on a 203-mm- (8-in-) thick untreated granular base and a 178-mm (7-inch) AC surface over a 305-mm- (12-in-) thick granular base. Rigid pavement test sections consist of doweled JPCP with a 203-mm (8-inch) and 279-mm (11-inch) PCC surface thickness on 152-mm- (6-in-) thick dense-graded granular base. The pavement structures included in this study match pavement structures included in the SPS-1 and -2 experiments. The experiment design stipulates that traffic volume in the study lane be at least 100 vehicles per day, but not more than 10,000 80-kN (18-kip) ESALs /year. The flexible and rigid pavement sections may be constructed at the same site or at different sites.

B.2.9 SPS-9 : Validation of SHRP Asphalt Specifications and Mix Design

SPS-9 P was a pilot effort started at the end of the SHRP program to get some experience in implementing the Superpave specifications. Test sections classified as SPS-9P were constructed using a very limited set of guidelines. In some instances, specifications were based on interim Superpave specifications that were changed at a later date. Many of these test sections were constructed before materials sampling and testing guidelines were established.

The SPS-9 A experiment, Superpave Asphalt Binder Study, requires construction of a minimum of two test sections at each project site. Construction can include new construction, reconstruction, or overlay . The minimum test sections consist of the highway agencies' standard mix, the Superpave level 1 designed standard mix, and the Superpave mix with an alternate binder grade either higher or lower than the specified Superpave binder. The minimum of two test sections at some sites results from the agency's declaration that the Superpave test section is the same as the standard agency mix. This will provide the opportunity to evaluate and improve the practical aspects of implementing the Superpave mix design by: (1) a hands-on field trial by interested highway agencies, (2) a comparison of the performance of the Superpave mixes against mixes designed using current highway agencies' asphalt specifications, (3) asphalt-aggregate specifications and mix design procedures, and (4) testing of the sensitivity of the Superpave asphalt binder specifications relative to low-temperature cracking, fatigue, or permanent deformation distress factors.


APPENDIX C. DATA EXTRACTION EXAMPLES

This appendix contains two data extraction examples. They illustrate productive practices for dealing with data from the LTPP database using the SQL. These examples provide one method for organizing data from an RDBMS. Some software packages provide other methods of querying data, such as the query interface in Microsoft Access 2000.

For those unfamiliar with SQL, a reference book on SQL is highly recommended. The SQL statements that follow have been written for and tested with Microsoft Access 2000. Some of them, especially the ones that make use of aliasing and subqueries, will need to be modified for use with previous versions of Microsoft Access. In addition, those that use domain aggregate functions may need slight modifications for use with RDBMS's such as Oracle.

C.1 SMP DATA

In the following example, we will extract the data necessary to track air temperature, precipitation, and subsurface temperature on an hourly basis for a single section for a period of one week. The section of choice is 360801, a test section in the SPS-8 experiment located in New York. The time period being selected is March 1-8, 1996.

C.1.1 Ambient Temperature and Precipitation

First of all, we will need the ambient air temperature and precipitation. Since we want hourly data, we need to go to SMP_ATEMP_RAIN_HOUR. The required query is straightforward:

SELECT smp_date, atemp_rain_time, avg_hour_air_temperature, rain_hour

FROM smp_atemp_rain_hour

WHERE state_code = 36

AND shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date BETWEEN #3/01/1996# AND #3/08/1996#;

The first 10 rows of the 192 rows in the result set are as follows:

smp_date

atemp_rain_time

avg_hour_air_temperature

rain_hour

3/01/1996
0100
-8.3
0
3/01/1996
0200
-7.6
0
3/01/1996
0300
-7.5
0
3/01/1996
0400
-7.3
0
3/01/1996
0500
-7.3
0
3/01/1996
0600
-7.3
0
3/01/1996
0700
-7.8
0
3/01/1996
0800
-7.8
0
3/01/1996
0900
-6.2
0
3/01/1996
1000
-4.8
0

The time is in a 24-hour military-style string format, the temperature is in degrees Celsius, and the precipitation is in millimeters.

C.1.2 Subsurface Temperatures

Next, we need to get the subsurface temperatures. This will require a join, since the temperatures themselves and the depth at which they were taken are stored in separate tables. The necessary query is:

SELECT smp_date, temperature_time, avg_hour_temperature, therm_depth

FROM smp_mrctemp_auto_hour a, smp_mrctemp_depths b

WHERE a.state_code = 36

AND a.shrp_id = '0801'

AND a.state_code = b.state_code

AND a.shrp_id = b.shrp_id

AND a.therm_no = b.therm_no

AND smp_date BETWEEN #3/01/1996# AND #3/08/1996#;

The first 10 rows of the 960 rows in the result set are as follows:

smp_date

temperature_time

avg_hour_temperature

therm_depth

3/01/1996
2400
-4.7
0.025
3/04/1996
2200
-3.1
0.025
3/03/1996
0600
-5.4
0.025
3/08/1996
1700
-1.9
0.025
3/02/1996
0100
-4.9
0.025
3/08/1996
1800
-3.5
0.025
3/05/1996
2200
-1.7
0.025
3/08/1996
1900
-5.0
0.025
3/08/1996
1500
0.5
0.025
3/08/1996
2000
-5.6
0.025

The time is in a 24-hour military-style string format, the temperature is in degrees Celsius, and the depth is in meters from the pavement surface.

C.1.3 Subsurface Moisture

Subsurface moisture data are only available in approximately monthly intervals. A quick query of SMP_TDR_MOISTURE_AUTO will reveal that there is no subsurface moisture data available between 3/01/1996 and 3/08/1996. The following query can be conducted to determine which dates are available:

SELECT DISTINCT smp_date

FROM smp_tdr_auto_moisture

WHERE state_code = 36

AND shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date BETWEEN #2/01/1996# AND #4/01/1996#;

The result set is as follows:

smp_date

2/08/1996
3/11/1996
3/26/1996

We can then extract the moisture gradient for the day closest to our time period as follows:

SELECT smp_date, tdr_time, gravimetric_moisture_content, tdr_depth

FROM smp_tdr_auto_moisture a, smp_tdr_depths_length b

WHERE a.state_code = b.state_code

AND a.shrp_id = b.shrp_id

AND a.tdr_no = b.tdr_no

AND a.smp_date = #3/11/1996#

The result set is as follows:

smp_date

tdr_time

gravimetric_moisture_content

tdr_depth

3/11/1996
1206
4.1
0.24
3/11/1996
1207
14.6
0.39
3/11/1996
1207
18.9
0.54
3/11/1996
1210
16.5
1.13
3/11/1996
1210
15.6
1.30
3/11/1996
1211
17.3
1.61

The time is in a 24-hour military-style string format, the gravimetric moisture content is in percent by weight of dry soil, and the depth is in meters from the pavement surface.

C.1.4 Electrical Resistance and Resistivity

Like subsurface moisture gradients, electrical resistance and resistivity measurements are only available in approximately monthly intervals. To determine the available dates, we can run the following query:

SELECT DISTINCT smp_date

FROM smp_eresist_man_contact

WHERE state_code = 36

AND shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date BETWEEN #2/01/1996# AND #5/01/1996#

The query returns the following result set:

smp_date

2/08/1996
4/09/1996

Since 2/08/1996 is marginally closer to our target date, we will use that date. However, you should note that these tests are commonly conducted twice during a given day, as can be shown in the following query:  

SELECT DISTINCT smp_date, COUNT(*) as num_repetitions

FROM smp_eresist_man_contact

GROUP BY smp_date, electrode_start;

The result set is:

smp_date

num_repetitions

2/08/1996
2
4/09/1996
2

This query shows that the resistance was measured across all of the electrodes twice during each day. We will look at the data collected in the afternoon. Electrical resistivity measurements are taken between electrodes at different depths. We will treat the depth at which the measurement was taken as the mean depth between the two electrodes. The query is as follows:  

SELECT g.avg_depth, contact_resistance, bulk_resistivity

FROM

(SELECT contact_resistance, (depth_1 + depth_2)/2 as avg_depth

FROM

(SELECT elct_depth as depth_1, electrode_start, resistance as contact_resistance

FROM smp_eresist_man_contact a, smp_eresist_depths b

WHERE a.electrode_start = b.electrode_no

AND a.state_code = b.state_code

AND a.shrp_id = b.shrp_id

AND a.state_code = 36

AND a.shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date = #2/08/1996#

AND VAL(eresist_time) > 1200) c,

(SELECT elct_depth as depth_2, electrode_start

FROM smp_eresist_man_contact d, smp_eresist_depths e

WHERE d.electrode_end = e.electrode_no

AND d.state_code = e.state_code

AND d.shrp_id = e.shrp_id

AND d.state_code = 36

AND d.shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date = #2/08/1996#

AND VAL(eresist_time) > 1200) f

WHERE c.electrode_start = f.electrode_start) g,

(SELECT bulk_resistivity, (depth_1 + depth_2)/2 as avg_depth

FROM

(SELECT elct_depth as depth_1, eamp_start, resistivity as bulk_resistivity

FROM smp_eresist_man_4point h, smp_eresist_depths i

WHERE h.eamp_start = i.electrode_no

AND h.state_code = i.state_code

AND h.shrp_id = i.shrp_id

AND h.state_code = 36

AND h.shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date = #2/08/1996#

AND VAL(eresist_time) > 1200) j,

(SELECT elct_depth as depth_2, eamp_start

FROM smp_eresist_man_4point k, smp_eresist_depths l

WHERE k.eamp_end = l.electrode_no

AND k.state_code = l.state_code

AND k.shrp_id = l.shrp_id

AND k.state_code = 36

AND k.shrp_id = '0801'

AND smp_date = #2/08/1996#

AND VAL(eresist_time) > 1200) m

WHERE j.eamp_start = m.eamp_start) n

WHERE g.avg_depth BETWEEN n.avg_depth - 0.01 AND n.avg_depth + 0.01;

The result set is as follows:

avg_depth

contact_resistance

bulk_resistivity

0.3035
396
13
0.354
243
13
0.4045
256
12
0.4555
298
10
0.5065
342
14
0.557
598
13
0.6075
954
22
0.6585
757
15
0.7095
466
23
0.76
443
14
0.8105
416
17
0.8615
384
15
0.912
414
18
0.963
475
15
1.014
525
20
1.064
506
15
1.115
479
18
1.1665
412
18
1.217
398
17
1.268
453
17
1.3195
468
19
1.37
323
17
1.42
218
17
1.4705
222
16
1.5205
222
16
1.572
223
14
1.6235
218
16
1.6725
227
14
1.723
252
15
1.775
262
15
1.8265
251
13
1.8765
223
14
1.9265
203
13

The depth is in meters below the pavement surface, the contact resistance is in ohms, and the bulk resistivity is in ohm-meters. The above query is quite complex since it uses four nested subqueries. When dealing with such queries, always be certain that they are working as intended before relying on the results. A good method for checking such queries is to determine ahead of time how many records should be returned and then cross-check that number against the actual number of records returned. Also, each subquery can be run and examined on its own before assembling them.

C.2 BACKCALCULATION

This example outlines a typical data extraction that involves queries of deflection and materials tables for data in support of backcalculation analysis to determine the elastic layer moduli of flexible pavements. The SQL statements required for this task illustrate a relatively complex set of instructions involving the linkage of tables from a variety of database modules. It requires careful evaluation of the tables to ensure that the correct data are used for the purpose.

The minimum requirements for data in order to support backcalculation analysis are:

In this example, we will perform the data extraction in the following sequence:

C.2.1 MON_DEFL Database Tables

Since deflection test data are distributed among a number of related tables in the MON_DEFL submodule, it is necessary to familiarize oneself with it before attempting to extract data. Prominent tables in the submodule include MON_DEFL_DROP_DATA, which contains the drop heights, load, and measured deflections for each FWD drop, and MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO, which contains the location information for the drops. The two tables are related through the STATE_CODE, SHRP_ID, TEST_DATE, and TEST_TIME fields. The offsets of each FWD geophone sensor are in MON_DEFL_DEV_SENSORS, which can be related to MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO through the CONFIGURATION_NO field.

Pavement temperatures that were measured during each FWD test can be extracted from the MON_DEFL_TEMP_VALUES and MON_DEFL_TEMP_DEPTHS tables, which are related to the previously discussed tables and to each other through the STATE_CODE, SHRP_ID, and TEST_DATE fields.

Information about the relationships among all database tables can be found within the Table Navigator software. It is recommended that the software be consulted before attempting any extraction of data from the LTPP database.

C.2.2 Temperature Tables

For sections within SMP, subsurface temperatures can be extracted from the SMP_MRCTEMP_* tables. However, temperature gradients in the pavement surface layer are also manually collected during FWD testing for both SMP and non-SMP test sections. These pavement temperature readings were taken at regular 30- to 60-minute intervals during deflection testing at each LTPP site and are stored within the MON_DEFL_TEMPS_DEPTHS and MON_DEFL_TEMPS_VALUES tables. We will have to extract the temperatures, depths, and times into a single table and the deflection values, deflection test locations, and times into another table. An interpolation process must then be used to estimate the temperature gradient present within the AC pavement layers at the time of the actual deflection test. Assuming that we want data from site 341003 for a test conducted on 3/11/99, the required SQL statement is:

SELECT

d.shrp_id, d.state_code, d.test_date, layer_temp_depth_1, layer_temperature_1, time_layer_temp, d.point_loc

FROM

mon_defl_temp_depths d, mon_defl_temp_values v

WHERE

d.state_code = v.state_code

AND

d.shrp_id = v.shrp_id

AND

d.test_date = v.test_date

AND

d.point_loc = v.point_loc and d.state_code = 34

AND

d.shrp_id = '1003'

AND

d.test_date = #3/11/1999#

ORDER BY

v.time_layer_temp, d.point_loc;  

For the purpose of brevity, only the first depth at which the temperature was measured is queried. To retrieve the other temperatures and their respective depths, simply add

LAYER_TEMP_DEPTH_2, LAYER_TEMPERATURE_2, etc., to the SELECT statement. The partial result set is listed below:

state_code

shrp_id

test_date

layer_temp_depth_1

layer_temperature_1

time_layer_temp

point_loc

34
1003
3/11/1999
25
-1.4
910
-3
34
1003
3/11/1999
25
3.9
1015
-3
34
1003
3/11/1999
25
8.2
1125
-3

The depth is in millimeters, the temperature is in degrees Celsius, and the point location is in meters.

C.2.3 Deflection Tables

Having established the temperature gradient for FWD tests conducted on March 11, 1999, on LTPP test site 341003, the next step is to extract deflection values for the purpose of establishing the deflection basins. Data resulting from a single FWD test are distributed among five tables. The relationships between these tables are illustrated below.

The peak deflection values recorded by all sensors are stored within the MON_DEFL_DROP_DATA table. The sensor spacing figures can be extracted from MON_DEFL_DEV_SENSORS. A suitable SQL statement must be constructed to relate the tables so that the recorded deflection values can be matched to the appropriate sensor spacing. This can be done with the CONFIGURATION field from the MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO table. The first step is to extract the raw deflection data for the section and date in question, in this case, 341003 on March 11, 1999:

SELECT

state_code, shrp_id, test_date, test_time, defl_unit_id, point_loc, lane_no, drop_no, drop_load, peak_defl_1

FROM

mon_defl_drop_data

WHERE

state_code = 34

AND

shrp_id = '1003'

AND

test_date = #3/11/1999#;  

For the purposes of clarity and brevity, this query was written to extract deflection data from sensor 1 only. Obviously, it would need to be modified by the addition of PEAK_DEFL_2, etc., to the SELECT clause to fully characterize the deflection bowl shapes at each test location. A partial listing of the result set from that query is as follows:

This figure shows how the fields STATE_CODE, SHRP_ID, TEST_DATE and DEFL_UNIT_ID can be used to link records in the MON_DEFL_MASTER table to recrods in the MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO table. Adding LANE_NO and POINT_NO to the previous specified fields, allow a link between MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO and MON_DEFL_DROP_DATA. From the MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO table, CONFIGURATION_NO can be used to link to recrods in the MON_DEFL_DEV_CONFIG and MON_DEFL_DEV_SENSORS tables.
 

state_code

shrp_id

test_date

test_time

defl_unit_id

point_loc

lane_no

Drop_no

drop_load

peak_defl_1

34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
1
384
156
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
2
381
155
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
3
387
156
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
4
382
154
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
5
606
234
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
6
608
234
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
7
610
234
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
8
607
234
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
9
805
300
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
10
805
300
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
11
806
300
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
12
805
299
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
13
1067
376
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
14
1068
377
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
15
1068
377
34
1003
3/11/1999
0852
8002-129
0
F1
16
1067
377

The table above represents a series of 16 drops at station 0+00 in the outer wheel path of LTPP site 341003 conducted at 8:52 a.m. on March 11, 1999. The drop load is in kilonewtons and the peak deflection is in micrometers. For this information to be of any use in backcalculation, we must also determine the offsets of the deflection sensors. To do this, we must first determine the CONFIGURATION_NO from the MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO table and then query the MON_DEFL_DEV_SENSORS table using this value as follows:

SELECT DISTINCT a.configuration_no, sensor_no, center_offset

FROM mon_defl_dev_sensors a, mon_defl_loc_info b

WHERE a.configuration_no = b.configuration_no

AND state_code = 34

AND shrp_id = '1003'

AND test_date = #3/11/1999#;

The result set from the above query is as follows:

configuration_no

sensor_no

center_offset

100642
1
0
100642
2
203
100642
3
305
100642
4
457
100642
5
610
100642
6
914
100642
7
1524

The above query does not fully specify all of the key fields in MON_DEFL_LOC_INFO; however, this is generally not necessary. In the unlikely event that two different FWDs were tested on the same section on the same day or that the unit changed configuration during the test (this would be evidenced by the query returning more than one record per sensor), the query should be further refined by specifying the DEFL_UNIT_ID and TEST_TIME.

The EXPERIMENT_SECTION table indicates that on 4/08/1994, this site was assigned a CONSTRUCTION_NO = 2. With this information, we can extract the relevant layer information.

C.2.4 Layer Information Tables

Thus far, we have deflection and temperature information for the site, but have not extracted pavement layer and material properties. The database contains two types of layer information: agency-supplied layer information and LTPP-determined layer information. The agency-supplied information is not considered to be research-grade data, and we do not recommend that it be used for backcalculation purposes. However, this alternate source of information may be of use to researchers conducting indepth investigations of a specific section. For GPS test sections, this information is located in the INV_LAYER table. For SPS test sections, similar information is located in the SPS?_LAYER tables, where "?" is the SPS experiment number. The exceptions are the SPS-3 and -4 sections, which do not have this information.

LTPP-determined layer thickness information is available from the TST_L05A and TST_L05B tables (TST_L05B is described in detail within the description of the Materials Testing module). The thicknesses recorded within these tables DO NOT necessarily match. The values within the TST_L05A table are the measured thicknesses of layers either from materials sampled immediately before and/or immediately after the test section location or from elevation surveys. In some cases, notably for subgrade thicknesses, there are also numbers from shoulder probe samples taken midway along the section's length. In contrast, the TST_L05B tables contain one field for a single representative thickness for each layer of the section. This value is derived from the measured values from the TST_L05A table and from analysis of the deflection data. It is a single subjective best estimate of a value that, in reality, is variable throughout the section's length. A simple SQL statement to extract layer thickness information from TST_L05B is as follows:

SELECT layer_no, inv_layer_no, description, layer_type, repr_thickness, matl_code, construction_no

FROM tst_l05b

WHERE state_code = 34

AND shrp_id = '1003';

The result set is as follows:

 

layer_no

inv_layer_no

description

layer_type

repr_thickness

matl_code

construction_no

1
1
7
SS
54.0
282
1
2
1
6
GS
24.9
308
1
3
2
5
GB
7.4
308
1
4
3
4
AC
5.9
1
1
5
4
3
AC
1.6
1
1
1
1
7
SS
54.0
282
2
2
1
6
GS
24.9
308
2
3
2
5
GB
7.4
308
2
4
3
4
AC
5.5
1
2
5
4
3
AC
0
1
2
6
 
1
AC
2.2
1
2

Because we did not specify a CONSTRUCTION_NO, we received two sets of layer information. The differences are attributable to a mill and AC overlay operation that occurred in 1994. (The type of operation can be determined by querying CN_CHANGE_REASON in the EXPERIMENT_SECTION table.) The thickness of layer 5 was reduced to 0, layer 4 was reduced in thickness, and layer 6 was added to the cross section of this site at that time. This example illustrates two important aspects of TST_L05B:

The deflection tests were conducted after the overlay date, so the layer information from CONSTRUCTION_NO = 2 should be used.

C.2.5 Laboratory Materials Testing Data

Any attribute of the materials used in the construction of these layers can be extracted from the appropriate table. For example, the following query retrieves the gradation of the unbound materials at this test section:

SELECT

layer_no, loc_no, sample_no, test_no, one_half_passing, no_10_passing, no_200_passing

FROM

tst_ss01_ug01_ug02

WHERE

state_code = 34

AND

shrp_id = '1003';

The result set from this query is as follows:

 

layer_no

loc_no

sample_no

test_no

one_half_passing

no_10_passing

no_200_passing

2 BA* BG** 1 73 49 9.5
2 TP1 BG56 2 83 57 6.2
3 BA* BG** 1 76 45 8.9
3 TP1 BG55 2 75 49 11.0
 

Two observations can be made about this data. First, we have two different test results for the granular subbase (LAYER_NO = 2) and base layers (LAYER_NO = 3). How to resolve this is left up to the user of the data; however, the user should note that the tests with a TEST_NO of 1 (TEST_NO is a code of the type TEST) are based on samples from the approach end of the section, while those with a TEST_NO of 2 are from the leave end of the section (152- m (500-ft) apart). Also, samples with a LOC_NO like TP? are from test pits, while those with a LOC_NO like BA? are from material extracted through a core hole.

A more significant issue is that there is no information on the subgrade (LAYER_NO = 1). A fallback option is to check the agency-supplied data in INV_GRADATION with the following query:

SELECT layer_no, one_half_passing, no_10_passing, no_200_passing

FROM inv_gradation

WHERE state_code = 34

AND shrp_id = '1003';

The result set from this query is as follows:

layer_no

one_half_passing

no_10_passing

no_200_passing

1      
2     5
3 70    
4 100   7

Note that LAYER_NO in any INV table must be mapped as INV_LAYER_NO in TST_L05B. However, in this case, the agency did not supply any useful data. Our last resort for information on the subgrade is to use MATL _CODE in TST_L05B. Checking the LTPPDD, we find that MATL_CODE is a code of the type MATERIAL. Therefore, we can conduct the following query (this can also be done with the Table Navigator software):

SELECT detail

FROM codes

WHERE codetype = 'MATERIAL'

AND code = '282';

Our result is:

detail

Rock

This, of course, explains why we could not find any laboratory test information on this subgrade.

Likewise, information about the AC layers may be of use in setting modulus seed values in backcalculation. The following query extracts useful information from TST_AC02, TST_AC03, and TST_AC04.

SELECT

a.layer_no, avg_bsg, avg_max_sg, (100 * (1 - (avg_bsg / avg_max_sg))) as air_voids, asphalt_content

FROM

(SELECT

layer_no, AVG(bsg) as avg_bsg

FROM

tst_ac02

WHERE

state_code = 34

AND

shrp_id = '1003'

GROUP BY

state_code, shrp_id, layer_no) a, (SELECT layer_no, AVG(max_spec_gravity) as avg_max_sg

FROM

tst_ac03

WHERE

state_code = 34

AND

shrp_id = '1003'

GROUP BY

state_code, shrp_id, layer_no) b, (SELECT layer_no, AVG(asphalt_content_mean) as asphalt_content

FROM

tst_ac04

WHERE

state_code = 34

AND

shrp_id = '1003'

GROUP BY

state_code, shrp_id, layer_no) c

WHERE

VAL(a.layer_no) = VAL(b.layer_no)

AND

VAL(a.layer_no) = VAL(c.layer_no);

The VAL function is used here to work around an apparent bug in Microsoft Access' data type handling routine. The result set from this query is as follows:

layer_no

avg_bsg

avg_max_sg

air_voids

asphalt_content

4 2.42516666666666666666667 2.542 4.59611854183058 4.4
5 2.3805 2.4845 4.18595290802978 5.85
6 2.386 2.5115 4.99701373681067 9

The above query shows the power of SQL to easily and quickly bring together data elements spread across different tables. The researcher may want to add count(*), min(*), max(*), and even stdev(*) functions where the avg(*) function is used to identify outliers, and as a general indication of data quality. Complex queries such as the one above should certainly be examined thoroughly to ensure that they function as intended. Because SPS sections are co-located and often share maximum specific gravity specimens between them, calculating air voids sometimes requires more finesse.



INDEX

A

Administration module, 13

Codes, 16

Data Dictionary, 15

Experiment Section, 13

Admixtures, 40, 41

Aggregate, 87, 90, 91

Gradation, 92

Shape, 87

Air voids, 89

Asphalt cement

Bulk samples, 100

Extraction, 86

Penetration, 86

Viscosity, 86

Asphalt cement properties, 38, 39, 40, 71

Asphalt concrete

Aggregate gradation, 87

Air voids, 30, 31, 82, 85, 87, 89, 105

Asphalt cement extraction, 86

Coarse aggregate, 87

Creep compliance, 83

Fine aggregate, 87

Fine aggregate shape, 87

Indirect tensile strength, 83

Moisture damage, 83

Moisture susceptibility, 31, 82

Remolded specimen, 101

Resilient modulus, 83

Asphalt Concrete core exam, 81

Asphalt concrete overlay, 37

Asphalt concrete properties, 38, 39

Asphalt content, 31, 38, 39, 82, 91

Asphalt emulsions, 90, 91

Atterberg limits, 94

Automated vehicle classification, 74

Automated weather stations, 19

Axle load distribution, 75

B

Backcalculation, 51

Base material, 92, 93, 94

Benkelman beam, 63, 68, 69

Bond shear strength, 89

Bulk specific gravity asphalt concrete cores, 30, 31, 82, 85, 87, 89, 105

C

Chip seal, 68, 91, 92, 101, 144

Climate data, 21

Codes, 16

Coefficient of thermal expansion, 88

Comments, 17

Compaction, 31, 37, 41, 63, 64, 65, 66, 72, 83

Compressive strength, 88

Construction quality control, 66

CONSTRUCTION_NO, 13, 106

Continuously reinforced concrete pavement, viii, 4, 142

Cost, 7, 30, 36, 42, 109

Crack and seat, 5, 41

Crack sealing, 11, 13, 36, 42, 66, 69, 100, 106

Creep compliance, 83, 84, 85

Curing, 31, 36, 40, 41, 42, 67, 68, 71

Cut / fill locations, 64

D

Data dictionary, 15

Data release, 109

DataPave, 110

Date of material sampling, 97

Deflection data

Pavement temperature gradient, 8, 49, 51

Peak deflections, 50

Sensor spacing, 51

Time history, 49

Deflection measurements, 49

Delamination, 70

Density, 88, 93, 94

Design mixture properties, 71

Distress measurement, 43

Drainage, 30, 42, 43, 53, 54, 64, 67, 143

Dynaflect measurements, 70

Dynamic load response, 10, 25

E

Electrical resistivity, 16, 55, 58

Equivalent single axle load, 75, 76, 143, 144, 145

F

Faulting, 44

FIELD_SET, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97

Flakiness index, 90

Flexural strength, 89

Freezing index, 24

Friction, 11, 53

FWD backcalculation, 51

G

General pavement studies, viii, 2, 3, 9

Experiments, 4

Gradation, 30, 31, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 57, 67, 87, 91, 92, 93, 158, 159

Grinding, 36, 41, 42, 67, 71, 158

Grooving, 33, 36, 42

Grout, 70, 145

H

Heater scarification, 41

Hydraulic conductivity measurements, 94

I

IMP_TYPE, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41

Indirect tensile strength, 83

International Roughness Index, 49

Intersection, 64

Inventory data, 29

J

Joint seal, 11, 30, 36, 42, 69, 101, 144

Joint sealants

Hot poured, 90

Silicone, 90

K

K-value, 93

L

LAB_CODE, 81

Layer

SPS, 63, 65

TST module, 101, 102

Link

SPS project layers, 103

SPS to GPS, 21, 23, 29, 64, 65

TST layers to INV layers, 103

Load transfer, 30, 40, 41, 44, 50, 60, 66, 67, 68, 71, 141

Load transfer restoration, 41, 67

LOC_NO, 97

Location coordinates, 10, 29, 64, 65

Location of material sampling, 97

Longitudinal profile, 48

Low temperature cracking, 43

LTPP objectives, 1

M

Maintenance data, 33

Material classification, 93

Material properties

Air voids, 89

Coefficient of thermal expansion, 88

Compressive strength, 88, 92

Creep compliance, 83

Flexural strength, 89

Indirect tensile strength, 83

Modulus of elasticity, 89

Modulus of subgrade reaction, 93

Permeability, 94

Resilient modulus, 83, 95

Material sampling location, 97

Material tests

FIELD_SET, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97

SAMPLE_AREA, 80

Test types and protocols, 77

TEST_NO, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97, 158

Maxim specific gravity asphalt concrete cores, 82, 105

Milling, 33, 36, 41, 42, 67, 70, 102, 145, 158

MNT_IMP, 33, 35, 36, 42

Modules, 10

Modulus of elasticity, 89

Modulus of subgrade reaction, 93

Moisture content, 88, 93, 94

N

Nuclear density gauge, 88

Nuclear density measurements, 67

O

Obtaining data, 109

Operating weather station, 21

Overlays, 33, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 43, 66, 67, 68, 70, 71, 77, 80, 100, 102, 106, 142, 143, 144, 145, 158

P

Patching, 11, 35, 36, 42, 43, 67, 68

Pavement performance database

Introduction, 7

Pavement temperature, 51, 56, 153

Permeability, 94

Photographic images, 43

Plant-mixed asphalt concrete, 30, 31, 34, 35, 37, 63, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 71

Portland cement concrete

Air voids, 89

Bond shear strength, 89

Bulk specific gravity, 89

Compressive strength, 88

Core exam, 89

Density, 89

Flexural strength, 89

Modulus of elasticity, 89

Sampling, 101

Tensile strength, 88

Thermal coefficient, 88

Portland cement concrete mixture properties, 40, 41

Portland cement concrete overlay, 3, 40, 41, 70, 71

Bonded, 3, 4, 70, 71, 117, 118, 124, 129, 130, 132, 144

Unbonded, 4, 143

Potential vertical rise, 94

Profile measurement

Longitudinal, 48, 49

Transverse, 45, 47

Profilograph, 67

R

Recycled asphalt concrete, 37, 38, 39, 40

Reflection cracking, 43

Rehabilitation data, 33

Reinforcing steel, 30, 40, 41, 68

Resilient modulus

Asphalt concrete, 83

Unbound material, 95

RHB_IMP, 11, 33, 35, 37

Rubblization, 41

Rutting, 45, 48

S

SAMPLE_AREA, 80

SAMPLE_NO, 99

Sand equivalency, 90

Saw and seal, 70

Seal coat, 33, 36, 42, 141, 142

Seasonal monitoring program, 11, 15, 55

Air temperature and precipitation, 55, 147

Frost, 58

Joint opening and faulting, 60

Measurement locations, 60

moisture content, 56

Pavement temperature gradient, 56

Surface elevation, 59

Water table, 59

Shoulder, 34

Shoulder drop off, 45

SHRP_ID, 13, 105

Slurry seal, 68, 91, 97, 101, 144

Slurry seals, 90, 91

Specific pavement studies, 2, 3, 9, 11, 63, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 124, 133, 134

Experiments, 4

SPS-1, 2, 3, 4, 19, 25, 53, 63, 65, 66, 67, 82, 94, 115, 116, 121, 122, 123, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 133, 134, 143, 145

SPS-2, 3, 4, 25, 53, 67, 68, 116, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 129, 131, 134, 135, 143

SPS-3, 4, 29, 45, 48, 63, 65, 68, 79, 86, 87, 90, 91, 92, 99, 100, 101, 116, 127, 131, 134, 135, 144, 157

SPS-4, 4, 63, 68, 69, 70, 116, 131, 144, 157

SPS-5, 4, 66, 67, 68, 83, 117, 121, 122, 124, 127, 129, 131, 132, 144

SPS-6, 4, 5, 53, 66, 67, 70, 117, 121, 124, 127, 129, 132, 144

SPS-7, 3, 4, 70, 71, 117, 118, 124, 129, 130, 132, 144

SPS-8, 3, 4, 118, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 128, 130, 132, 133, 134, 135, 145, 147

SPS-9, 4, 63, 67, 71, 72, 98, 100, 118, 119, 121, 122, 123, 125, 128, 130, 133, 134, 135, 145

Standard data release, 109

Standard Proctor, 94

STATE_CODE, 13

Strategic Highway Research Program, 1

Structured query language, 8

Subgrade, 92, 93, 94

Subgrade preparation, 66, 72

Supplemental sections, 15

Surface treatments, 90, 91

T

Table Navigator, 7, 17, 153, 159

Tensile strength, 88

Test sections Layout, 5

Locations, 5

TEST_NO, 80, 82, 83, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90, 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 97, 158

Thermal coefficient of expansion, 88

Time domain reflectometry, 56

Traffic data, 73

Automated vehicle classification, 74

Axle load distribution, 75

ESAL, 75, 76, 143, 144, 145

Historical, 75

Vehicle classification, 73, 74, 75

Volume counts, 75

Weigh-in-motion, 74, 76

Transverse profile

Data, 47

Distortion indices, 46

Measurements, 45, 47

Truth-in-data, 73

TST_L05A, 101

TST_L05B, 102

U

Unbound base, 66

Unconfined compressive strength, 92, 93

Undersealing, 67, 70, 144

V

Vehicle classification, 73, 74, 75

Virtual weather station, 21

W

Weigh-in-motion, 74, 76



As of this writing, LTPP had not established support for non-English language database formats. Please contact LTPP customer support for nonstandard data extraction requests.

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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