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Publication Number: FHWA-RD-01-164
Date: March 2002

Figure IIi-2

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Figure III-2: Flowchart. Flowchart for the selection of durable aggregates. This flowchart shows how to evaluate an aggregate source that has already passed ASTM 33 requirements.

The following represent scenarios when aggregates that perform satisfactorily in the field under similar conditions and are potentially non-durable should be mitigated or rejected. If the aggregate does not perform satisfactorily in the field under similar conditions, it should be rejected or mitigated and the failure should be investigated using Guideline 2.

  1. Aggregate is ASR susceptible, and has expanded beyond the limits set forth in ASTM C 12 60 and 12 93.
  2. Aggregate is comprised of a sufficient quantity of potentially unstable minerals so as to be deleterious.
  3. Aggregate is susceptible to freeze-thaw, fails the AASHTO 1 0 3 soundness test, and does not meet the ASTM 6 6 6A durability requirements.
  4. Aggregate is not potentially ASR susceptible or exceed the ASTM C 12 60 or 12 93 expansion limits, and it does not meet all of the durability requirements.
  5. Aggregate is not potentially ACR susceptible and it does not meet all of the durability requirements.
  6. Aggregate is potentially ACR susceptible, does not exceed the ASTM C 11 05 expansion limit, but the aggregate does not meet all durability requirements.
  7. Aggregate is potentially ACR susceptible, exceeds the ASTM C 11 05 expansion limits, however expansion is not due to ACR and the aggregate does not meet all durability requirements.
  8. Aggregate is not freeze-thaw susceptible and it does not meet all durability requirements.
  9. Aggregate is freeze-thaw susceptible and passes the AASHTO T 1 0 3 soundness test, but the aggregate does not meet all durability requirements.
  10. Aggregate is not made of potentially unstable materials and does not meet all durability requirements.
  11. Aggregate is made of potentially unstable materials, however the materials are not present in a sufficient quantity to be deletetorious, and the aggregate does not meet all durability requirements.

The following represents a scenario when aggregates that perform satisfactorily in the field under similar conditions and are potentially non-durable should be rejected.

  1. Aggregate is ACR susceptible, exceeds the ASTM C 11 05 expansion limits and expansion is due to ACR.

The following represents scenarios when aggregates that perform satisfactorily in the field under similar conditions should be accepted for use and are non-durable should be accepted for use. Note that all aggregates that are not potentially non-durable should be accepted for use in concretes.

  1. Aggregate is not potentially ASR susceptible and meets all durability requirements.
  2. Aggregate is potentially ASR susceptible, has expansion that does not exceed ASTM C 12 60 and/or 12 93 limits, and meets all durability requirements.
  3. Aggregate is not potentially ACR susceptible and meets all durability requirements.
  4. Aggregate is potentially ACR susceptible, has expansion that does not exceed ASTM C 11 05 limits, and meets all durability requirements.
  5. Aggregate is potentially ACR susceptible, has expansion that exceeds the ASTM C 11 05 limits but is not due to ACR, and meets all durability requirements.
  6. Aggregate is not potentially freeze-thaw susceptible and meets all durability requirements.
  7. Aggregate is potentially freeze-thaw susceptible, passes the AASHTO T 1 0 3 soundness test, and meets all durability requirements.
  8. Aggregate is not made of potentially unstable minerals and meets all durability requirements.
  9. Aggregate is made of potentially unstable materials but they are not present in a quantity sufficient to be deleterious, and meets all durability requirements.

 

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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