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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-052
Date: September 2005

Long-Term Plan for Concrete Pavement Research and Technology - The Concrete Pavement Road Map: Volume I, Background and Summary

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Figure 1. Diagram. CP Road Map development process.

This diagram illustrates the steps taken in developing the CP Road Map. A research database of recent and in-progress concrete pavement-related research was developed, then several hundred stakeholders at five major brainstorming events identified critical issues in design, mix and materials, construction, and pavement management/business systems. Research objectives were then identified, and these objectives were filtered through the research database to identify gaps in research. These gaps became the basis for 250 problem statements, which were fine tuned, sorted and resorted, and scheduled into phased tracks of research. The resulting 12 tracks are mix design, design guide, nondestructive testing, surface characteristics, equipment advancements, innovative joints, rehabilitation and construction, long life concrete, data collection, pavement performance, business systems and economics, and advanced materials.

Figure 2. Illustration. Advanced labs for advanced mixture designs.

In this illustration of the lab of the future, researchers are using advanced computers, software, and other technology to develop innovative mix designs.

Figure 3. Illustration. Advanced models for performance-based design.

As shown in this illustration, researchers working on CP Road Map projects will develop tools and models to help designers manipulate multiple variables in paving projects—such as materials, weather, structural requirements, pavement characteristics, subgrade, and drainage—and understand the implications of various design scenarios.

Figure 4. Illustration. Technologies for monitoring pavement data and making real-time adjustments during construction. This illustration depicts a construction supervisor using a hand-held device to monitor various technologies. Technologies such as satellites, global positioning systems, pavement sensors, and advanced paving and construction equipment will help engineers make timely decisions during construction projects in response to weather and other variables.

Figure 5. Illustration. Optimized pavement surfaces for a safe, quiet, and smooth ride.

The illustration depicts a semitractor-trailer and passenger car driving on a road during the rain. An inset closeup of the truck’s tires emphasizes the goal of reducing splash and spray on the wet pavement surface. The inset of a sleeping child in the car emphasizes the need for pavement surfaces that reduce tire-pavement noise and provide adequate traction for safety.

Figure 6. Illustration. Equipment and technology advancements.

This illustration depicts a futuristic, one-step pavement lifter, crusher, and sorter. Developing advanced and automated equipment like this will help the concrete paving industry complete highway projects quickly and effectively with minimal disruption to traffic.

Figure 7. Illustration. Breakthrough techniques for designing and rehabilitating joints.

The illustration depicts two cars approaching a joint in a slab of concrete. The joint is drawn to look like a zipper, suggesting that in the future, workers will be able to replace joints as quickly and conveniently as zipping a zipper.

Figure 8. Illustration. Modular construction:

One of many potential high-speed rehabilitation techniques. This figure shows a closeup illustration of modular construction. A slab of concrete is inset with locking joints and is suspended by three wires that are attached to the top of the slab

Figure 9. Illustration.

Pavements that perform well for 60 years or more. Depicting pages in a calendar, this illustration shows various stages in the life of a concrete pavement system, including scenes showing rainy and sunny weather, surveyors, excavation equipment, paving equipment, and traffic on the finished roadway. Researchers aim to design concrete pavements that perform well year after year, achieving a lifespan of 60 years or more.

Figure 10. Illustration. Accelerated load testing and data collection to improve models and systems.

This illustration shows a grid of concrete slabs and a large truck on top of them, depicting the pavement deflection caused by a heavy truck. A future national program for research will involve constructing test sections and collecting data on long-term performance from accelerated load tests.

Figure 11. Illustration. Systemwide data collection and analysis to support long-term performance.

This illustration depicts data being collected by pavement monitoring devices placed throughout the roadway system. The data listed are air void system, traffic spectrum, material-related distress, density, noise, pavement surface conditions, International Roughness Index smoothness, satellite global positioning system relay, and high-speed detection and analysis system. Collecting detailed data on performance will help State departments of transportation determine how well their concrete pavements live up to agency and user expectations.

Figure 12. Illustration. Innovative business systems.

This illustration depicts several contractors at a project bidding conference. In addition to a focus on materials and construction technologies, the CP Road Map drives research into new contracting options, warranty provisions, technology transfer systems, public-private partnerships, and economic models.

Figure 13. Illustration. Innovative concrete materials.

Fostering innovation in the development of new materials for constructing concrete pavements is another research focus area, as depicted in this illustration of a lab technician viewing computer graphics resulting from advanced testing. The goal is to examine existing materials that may have been used on a smaller scale or in laboratory evaluations to identify those showing promise for broader applicability and success in the field.

Figure 14. Diagram. Research management plan.

This figure demonstrates how the research in the CP Road Map would be managed. There are three categories in the diagram: Executive Advisory Committee (composed of Federal, States, and industry), Research Track Team Leaders (oversee work within each track: schedules, budgets, integration, and plan updates), and Administrative Support Group (which primarily provides support for the Executive Advisory Committee). There are several potential sustaining organizations listed within the Executive Advisory Committee: American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, American Concrete Pavement Association, Federal Highway Administration, Midwest Concrete Consortium, National Cooperative Highway Research Program, National Ready Mixed Concrete Association, National Stone, Sand, and Gravel Association, Portland Cement Association, Transportation Research Board, individual DOTs, and others. Members of this committee would oversee CP Road Map updates, integration of research tracks, research database management, integration of new software products, communications and technology transfer, partnering and fund management, and innovative research. The Administrative Support Group will provide lists of potential track leaders; suggest and facilitate partnering arrangements; help integrate research across tracks; update and maintain the research database; obtain information from State and Federal agencies on current research; develop recommendations for improving, adjusting, or adding new research; solicit new and innovative ideas and concepts; organize continuous expert review and advice on conduct of research; recommend strategies to ensure software compatibility; address intellectual property rights issues; identify and recommend technology transfer activities; identify and facilitate the development of specific, track-related training efforts; and develop and implement a communications effort. The Research Track Team Leaders would oversee work on each track, with the exception of track 11; this track would be overseen by the Executive Advisory Committee.

Return to Figure 14.

Figure 15. Illustration. CP Road Map goal.

This illustration depicts a symbiotic relationship among the objectives illustrated previously in figures 2, 3, 4, 9, and 11, and includes another drawing of a construction worker in a mobile van that can collect data, by satellite, of various materials’ performance, weather, and construction activities

Figure 16. Chart. Critical issues for tracks 1 and 2.

This chart displays the critical issues and objectives identified at various outreach events for research tracks 1 and 2. The issues for each track are evaluated in terms of materials and mix designs, overall design, construction, and permanent management and business systems.

Figure 17. Chart. Critical issues for tracks 3 and 4.

This chart displays the critical issues and objectives identified at various outreach events for research tracks 3 and 4. The issues for each track are evaluated in terms of materials and mix designs, overall design, construction, and permanent management and business systems.

Figure 18. Chart. Critical issues for tracks 5, 6, and 7.

This chart displays the critical issues and objectives identified at various outreach events for research tracks 5, 6, and 7. The issues for each track are evaluated in terms of materials and mix designs, overall design, construction, and permanent management and business systems.

Figure 19. Chart. Critical issues for tracks 8, 9, and 10.

This chart displays the critical issues and objectives identified at various outreach events for research tracks 8, 9, and 10. The issues for each track are evaluated in terms of materials and mix designs, overall design, construction, and permanent management and business systems.

Figure 20. Chart. Critical issues for tracks 11 and 12.

This chart displays the critical issues and objectives identified at various outreach events for research tracks 11 and 12. The issues for each track are evaluated in terms of materials and mix designs, overall design, construction, and permanent management and business systems.

 


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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