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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-068
Date: October 2005

Achieving A High Level of Smoothness in Concrete Pavements Without Sacrificing Long-Term Performance

REFERENCES

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  2. Perera, R.W. and Kohn, S.D., Issues in Pavement Smoothness, National Cooperative Highway Research Program, Washington, DC, 2001.
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  4. Spangler, E.B. and Kelley, W.J., "GMR Road Profilometer-A Method for Measuring Road Profile," Research Publication GMR-452, General Motors Research Laboratory, Warren, MI, 1964.
  5. Sayers, M.W. and Karamihas, S.M., The Little Book of Profiling: Basic Information about Measuring and Interpreting Road Profiles, University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, September 1998.
  6. California Test 526, Operation of the California Profilograph and Evaluation of Profiles, California Department of Transportation, January 2000.
  7. Scofield, L., Profilograph Limitations, Correlations, and Calibration Criteria for Effective Performance-Based Specifications, National Cooperative Highway Research Program, Project 20-7, Task 53, 1993.
  8. Sayers, M.W., Gillespie, T.D., and Queiroz, C.A.V., International Experiment to Establish Correlations and Standard Calibration Methods for Road Roughness Measurements, Technical Paper Number 45, World Bank, Washington, DC, 1986.
  9. American Society for Testing and Materials, Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Volume 4.03, Road and Paving Materials, Philadelphia, PA, 1999.
  10. Byrum, C.R., "Analysis by High-Speed Profile of Jointed Concrete Pavement Slab Curvature," Transportation Research Record 1730, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2000.
  11. Zachlehner, I., Restraint Stress in Young Concrete Pavements, Proceedings of the 6th International Symposium on Concrete Roads, Madrid, Spain, 1990.
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  13. Janoff, M.S., Pavement Roughness and Rideability Field Evaluation, NCHRP Report 308, National Research Council, Washington, DC, 1988.
  14. Sayers, M.W. and Karamihas, S.M, Interpretation of Road Roughness Profile Data, FHWA-RD-96-101, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC, 1996.
  15. Hancock, J. and Hossain, M., An Update on Kansas Experience with PCC Smoothness Specifications and Incentives, Proceedings of Mid-Continent Transportation Symposium, Ames, IA, 2000.
  16. "From the Project's Startup-Rideability is a Concern in Preparing for Paving," GOMACO World, 17(3), Ida Grove, IA, 1989, pp. 14-16.
  17. American Concrete Pavement Association, Constructing Smooth Concrete Pavements, Skokie, IL, 2003.
  18. American Concrete Pavement Association, Constructing Smooth Concrete Pavements, Skokie, IL, 2003.
  19. Capper, M.R., A Paving Superintendent's Viewpoint of Factors that Affect Ride, National Ride Workshop, American Concrete Pavement Association, March 1987.
  20. "Pavement's Rideability is Affected by Concrete," GOMACO World, 18(2), Ida Grove, IA, 1990, pp. 18-20.
  21. "Workable Concrete Mixes Go With Ride," GOMACO World, 19(1), Ida Grove, IA, 1991, pp. 20-21.
  22. U.S. Air Force, Proportioning Concrete Mixtures with Graded Aggregates-A Handbook for Rigid Airfield Pavements, Attachment 1, Engineering Technical Letter (ETL) 97-5, Florida, 1997.
  23. Shilstone, J.M., Sr. and Shilstone, J.M., Jr., Performance-Based Concrete Mixtures and Specifications for Today, The Shilstone Companies, Inc., Dallas, TX, 2002.
  24. Shilstone, J.M., Sr., Engineering Normal Strength, High-Performance Concrete for Bridges, Paper presented at the 79th Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 9-13, 2000.
  25. Grogg, M.G. and Smith, K.D., PCC Pavement Smoothness: Characteristics and Best Practices for Construction, Publication No. FHWA-IF-02-025, March 2002.
  26. "Paver Guidance Put to the Rideability Test," GOMACO World, 20(1), Ida Grove, IA, 1992, pp. 20-21.
  27. "Consistency is a Key to the Resulting Ride," GOMACO World, 19(3), Ida Grove, IA, 1991, pp. 24-25.
  28. Dalimier, M. and Torrent, R., Improvement in IRI Values of Concrete Pavements Constructed in Argentina with Slipform Pavers, Proceedings, Seventh International Conference on Concrete Pavements, Volume I, Orlando, FL, September 2001.
  29. "Equipment, Capabilities Can Influence Rideability," GOMACO World, 21(2), Ida Grove, IA, 1993, pp. 20-21.
  30. "Pavers Keeping Moving On to Get Best Rideability," GOMACO World, 22(1), Ida Grove, IA, 1994, pp. 20 - 21.
  31. "Overloading and Dowel Bars Concern Paving," GOMACO World, 22(2), Ida Grove, IA, 1994, pp. 20-21.
  32. Siddique, Z.Q., Devore, J., and Parcells, W.J., Effect of Curling on As-Constructed Smoothness of Portland Cement Concrete Pavements, Paper presented at the 81st Transportation Research Board Annual Meeting, Washington, DC, January 2002.
  33. "Achieving Smoothness with Dowel Bars," GOMACO World, 23(1), Ida Grove, IA, 1995, pp. 18-19.
  34. Sayers, M.W., Profiles of Roughness, Transportation Research Record 1260, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 1990.
  35. Byrum, C.R. and Kohn, S.D., Cumulative Traffic Prediction Method for Long-Term Pavement Performance Models, Transportation Research Record 1816, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC, 2002.
  36. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Materials Testing Handbook, CRD-C 39-81, Test Method for Coefficient of Linear Thermal Expansion of Concrete. Available online at www.wes.army.mil/SL/MTC/handbook/handbook.htm.
  37. American Society for Testing and Materials, "Annual Book of ASTM Standards," Volume 4.02, Concrete and Aggregates, Philadelphia, PA, 2002.
  38. Westergaard, H.M., "Analysis of Stresses in Concrete Roads Caused by Temperature," Public Roads: Journal of Highway Research, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 8(3), 1927.
  39. Westergaard, H.M., "Stresses in Concrete Pavements Computed by Theoretical Analysis" Public Roads: Journal of Highway Research, U.S. Department of Agriculture, 7(2), 1926.

 


The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Provide leadership and technology for the delivery of long life pavements that meet our customers needs and are safe, cost effective, and can be effectively maintained. Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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