Skip to contentUnited States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration FHWA Home
Research Home
REPORT
This report is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-12-054
Date: December 2012

 

Methodologies to Measure and Quantify Transportation Management Center Benefits: Final Synthesis Report

Figure 70. Illustration. Performance measures. This map shows a section of the Phoenix, AZ, area roadway system west and north of the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport. The freeways are shown as heavy blue lines, and the arterial streets are shown as light grey lines. Below the map, there is a table of three system-wide measures. The first system-wide measure is labeled "Computer System Reliability" and has an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Uptime" and a black arrow pointing down labeled "Time to Resume Service." The second measure is labeled "Multi-Agency Coordination" and has an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Number of Center-to-Center Communication Links." The third measure is labeled "Travel Information" and has six orange arrows pointing up. The arrows are labeled "Number of Users," "Number of Agencies Participants in Web-Based Highway Condition and Reporting System," "Percent of Smart Corridors with Speed Maps," "Percent of Buses Equipped with automatic vehicle locator," "Percent of Arterials with Travel Time Information," and "Customer Satisfaction." Seven initiatives impacting the system performance are shown on the map. The first, indicated by a small black car interstate 17(I-17) between Bethany Home Road and Camelback Road, is labeled "Freeway Mobility" and has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Travel Time" and an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Speed." The second initiative is shown as a small traffic light at the intersection of I-17 and Indian School road and is labeled "Freeway-Arterial Interface Pilot Project." It has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Travel Time and Delays." The third initiative is shown by a small black car on Indian School Road between I-17 and Route 51 and is labeled "Arterial Mobility." It has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Travel Time," an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Percent Signals Optimized and Coordinated," and an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Percent Interjurisdictional Signals Optimized and Coordinated." The forth initiative is shown as a small black ambulance on Thomas Road between I-17 and Route 51 labeled "Emergency Vehicle Signal Preemption." It has a call-out box with an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Percent Signals with Standard Emergency Preemption." The fifth initiative is shown as a small black bus on Van Buren Street between I-17 and Route 51 labeled "Transit Signal Priority." It has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Travel Times" and an orange arrow pointing up labeled "Schedule Adherence." The sixth initiative is shown as a collision between two small black cars on I-17 near the intersection with I-10 labeled "Freeway Incident Management." It has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Incident Duration and Clearance Time." The seventh initiative is shown as a collision between two small black cars on McDowell Road east of Route 51 labeled "Arterial Incident Management Pilot Project." It has a call-out box with a black arrow pointing down labeled "Response Time and Clearance Time."

Back

Figure 78. Illustration. Performance versus importance plot. This scatter plot shows the various road conditions and ride quality, traffic flow, and safety performance measures plotting the grade (-C to B) versus the importance factor (0.25 to 0.60). The graph has four quadrants, with the upper left quadrant labeled "Other Strengths" with a y-axis grade of -B to B (2.5 to 3.25) and an x-axis importance factor of 0.25 to 0.425. The upper right quadrant labeled "Top Strengths" with a y-axis grade of -B to B and an x-axis importance factor of 0.425 to 0.60. The lower right quadrant is labeled "Top Opportunities (priority 1 improvements)" with a y-axis grade of -C to +C (1.5 to 2.5) and an x-axis importance factor of 0.425 to 0.60. The lower left quadrant is labeled "Other Opportunities (priority 2 improvements)" with a y-axis grade of -C to +C and an x-axis importance factor of 0.25 to 0.425. The following results are shown. In the "Other Strengths" quadrant on the top left, the results are as follows: maintaining shoulders on interstates; maintaining bridges on both interstates and other state routes; sufficient travel lanes—off-peak on interstates; responding to incidents on both interstates and other State routes; electronic message signs on interstates; sufficiently wide lanes on other State routes; safe alignments on both interstates and other State routes; striping clearly visible (day) on interstates and other State routes; striping clearly visible (night) on interstates; guardrails and safety barrier placement on both interstates and other State routes; guardrails and safety barrier maintenance on both interstates and other State routes; and clear sight lines on interstates. In the "Top Strengths" quadrant on the top right, the results are as follows: sufficiently wide lanes on interstates; smooth road surfaces on interstates; safe intersections on interstates; durable repairs on interstates; sufficient travel lanes—off-peak on other State routes; road repairs when needed on interstates; and predictable travel times on both other state routes and interstates. In the "Other Opportunities" quadrant on the bottom left, results are as follows: maintaining shoulders on other State routes; durable repairs on other State routes; electronic message signs on other State routes; striping clearly visible (night) on other State routes; striping clearly visible (wet weather) on both interstates and State routes; and dead animal and debris removal on both interstates and State routes. In the Top Opportunities" quadrant on the bottom right, results are as follows: smooth road surface on other State routes; road repairs when needed on other State routes; complete repairs on timely basis on both interstates and other State routes; sufficient travel lanes at peak times on both interstates and other State routes; minimizing delays at work zones on both interstates and other State routes; reasonable travel times on both interstates and other State routes; safe intersections on other State routes; and clear sight lines on other State routes.

Back

ResearchFHWA
FHWA
United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration