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Federal Highway Administration Research and Technology
Coordinating, Developing, and Delivering Highway Transportation Innovations

Overview

 

Research and Development (R&D) Project Sites

 
Project Information
Project ID:   FHWA-PROJ-09-0067
Project Name:   Making Driving Simulators More Useful for Behavioral Research
Project Status:   Completed
Start Date:  November 12, 2009
End Date:  June 30, 2013
Contact Information
Last Name:  Philips
First Name:  Brian
Telephone:  202-493-3468
E-mail:  brian.philips@dot.gov
Office:   Office of Safety Research and Development
Team:   Human Factors Team [HRDS-30]
Program:   Exploratory Advanced Research
Laboratory:   Human Factors Laboratory
Project detail
Project Description:   Conduct experiments across multiple high-fidelity driving simulators (with partners) and compare outcomes to existing field data and to each other. The goal is to then develop a set of mathematical transformations that will allow scientists and engineers to better predict the behavior of drivers in real environments based on the results of experiments conducted in driving simulators.
Goals:   Conduct experiments across multiple high-fidelity driving simulators (with partners) and compare outcomes to existing field data and to each other. The goal is then to develop a set of mathematical transformations that will allow scientists and engineers to better predict the behavior of drivers in real environments based on the results of experiments conducted in driving simulators.
Background Information:   The results of driver simulator research do not always agree with real-world experience, or with results from field studies. Indeed, behavioral results from two different driving simulators may produce different results. These latter differences may be because of the physical differences between the two simulators. For example, simulator A may have a motion base, whereas simulator B does not. Simulator B may have sophisticated graphics, whereas simulator A does not. Roadway engineers would be more inclined to use driving simulators if the findings of results could be transformed to take into account the characteristics of the driving simulator. Such transformation functions, if they can be derived, would more accurately predict real-world driving behavior from driving simulator behavior, and would make it possible to more readily integrate results from different driving simulators.
Product Type:   Research report
Test Methodology:   Driving simulation experiment
Expected Benefits:   The outcomes of this project will greatly benefit the driving safety research community as it will begin to quantify much needed information about how simulators and simulator characteristics relate to each other and to real-world driving data.
Deliverables: Name: Making Driving Simulators More Useful for Behavioral Research Final Report
Product Type(s): Research report
Description: A preliminary set of mathematical transformations that will allow scientists and engineers to better estimate their simulator-based effects as applied to real roadway use. These transformations will be of two kinds: those that are generally applicable across a wide variety of simulators and those that represent correction factors that need to be applied for a particular type of simulator.
FHWA Topics:   Research/Technologies--FHWA Research and Technology
TRT Terms:   Driving Simulation
Human Factors
Safety
Research
Driving Simulators
Highways
FHWA Disciplines:   Safety
Subject Areas:   Research
Safety and Human Factors

 

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