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Tolling

 

Toll Facility Safety Study Report to Congress

Appendix C - Agency Survey

The findings from the survey are presented here according to the four parts of the survey:

  • General Information
  • Accident and Injury Data
  • Strategies and Programs to Improve Safety
  • Recommended Toll Facilities for Data Collection

General Information

Most agencies reported that the types of worker injuries listed on the survey occur infrequently. From the types of worker injuries listed on the survey, slips, trips, and falls were reported to have occurred with the most frequency. While two agencies reported moderate to frequent occurrences of worker injuries caused by vehicles passing through toll plazas, an overwhelming majority reported this injury type as occurring very infrequently. Agencies were invited to write in other types of worker injuries that were not included in the survey. Other reported worker injuries included over-exertion / repetitive motion, lifting, cash drawers, toll equipment, pulled arm, and insects.

Respondents also indicated that vehicular accidents caused by the factors listed in the survey occur infrequently in the vicinity of a toll plaza. The most frequent type of vehicular accident indicated that caused by vehicles selecting an improper lane at the plaza. The responses indicated that, of the types listed, the least frequent type of vehicular accident occurring in the vicinity of a toll plaza was accidents caused by vehicles backing at the plaza. As in the worker injury section, agencies were invited to write in other causes of vehicular crashes that were not included in the survey. Other causes reported by agencies included inattentive driving, striking the toll booth/toll equipment, truck/car interactions, and rear-end collisions.

Accident and Injury Data

Of the 27 agencies responding, 15 reported that they maintained crash data and most reported that they had between 5 and 10 years of data available electronically. Of the toll agencies that reported that they do not maintain crash data, most reported that the State Police maintain the data. An overwhelming majority of agencies reported maintaining worker injury data. Agencies reported maintaining anywhere from 2 to 25 years of electronic worker injury data, with an average of 8 years of data available. Virtually every agency did provide a point of contact for worker injury data, which the study team used in the subsequent data collection phase of the study.

Strategies and Programs to Improve Safety

In this section of the survey agencies were asked to provide information about safety strategies that have been implemented at their toll collection facilities. These findings can be found in the section of this report dealing with strategies (Section 4).

Agencies were also asked, "Are there any specific issues associated with toll facility safety that you are interested to see what other agencies are doing?" Issues of interest included:

  • Methods for reducing the occurrence of vehicles stopping in ETC lanes.
  • Methods for controlling speed through the lanes, especially ETC lanes.
  • Methods employees use for crossing lanes.
  • Methods used for closing a lane.
  • Use of different pavement marking patterns to encourage drivers to reduce their speed as they approach the plaza (specifically, patterns that give a perception that drivers are going faster than they really are).
  • Methods used to separate ETC lanes from other lanes.
  • Methods used to warn drivers of employees crossing the lane.

Recommended Toll Facilities for Data Collection

At the conclusion of the survey, respondents were asked to recommend some of their facilities for a site visit.

More Information

Contact

Bryan Cawley
Office of Asset Management, Pavements, and Construction
202-366-1333
E-mail Bryan

 
 
Updated: 04/07/2011
 

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United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration