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Federal Highway Administration Research and Technology
Coordinating, Developing, and Delivering Highway Transportation Innovations

 
FACT SHEET
This fact sheet is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
Publication Number:  FHWA-HRT-17-044    Date:  July 2017
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-17-044
Date: July 2017

 

Logo. The Exploratory Advanced Research Program's logo of a satellite over a highway-representing operating systems and reducing congestion.

The Exploratory Advanced Research Program

In-the-Loop Simulations Provide Improved Methods for Testing of Connected Vehicle Technologies

Simulations Link Actual Vehicles and Infrastructure with Virtual Traffic Environment

 

Exploratory Advanced Research - Next Generation Transportation Solutions

PDF Version (210 KB)

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Data from actual connected vehicles and traffic signals on a test track can be incorporated into complex connected vehicle simulations.
© 2016 Texas A&M Transportation Institute. Data from actual connected vehicles and traffic signals on a test track can be incorporated into complex connected vehicle simulations.

Connected vehicle (CV) technology uses vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-infrastructure wireless communication to exchange information among vehicles, traffic control systems, and mobile devices. Transportation managers will use connected vehicle data in a range of applications that result in more efficient traffic flow, enhanced safety, improved fuel efficiency, and reduced emissions. The engineers who are developing CV applications need a reliable, standardized way to test those technologies under a wide range of simulated conditions. The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program is supporting research that incorporates actual vehicle performance data into modeling and simulation platforms to accelerate the ability to study and assess complex CV and vehicle automation systems. Researchers at Texas A&M University Transportation Institute (TTI) are working with partners at Battelle Memorial Institute and Siemens Corporation on a project called “New Approaches for Testing Connected Highway and Vehicle Systems.” The goal of this EAR Program-sponsored project is to develop a simulation environment that incorporates data from real entities—a connected vehicle and signals in a roadway network—into a simulation. At the University of Michigan and the University of Minnesota, EAR Program-supported researchers have developed an in-the-loop system that transmits CV simulation data to a laboratory-housed engine and dynamometer. The project, “Building a Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Testbed,” links an actual powertrain with vehicle and traffic simulations to measure fuel consumption and emissions under varying CV scenarios.

 

Connected to the Future of Highway Transportation

CV technology will make it possible for cars, other vehicles, roadway signals, other infrastructure, smartphones, and other wireless devices to "talk" to each other. The CV environment will capture and exchange data from vehicle-to-vehicle communication devices located on cars, trucks, and buses to vehicle-to-infrastructure components such as traffic signals, cameras, and speed-monitoring equipment. The data-rich CV conversation will provide drivers and automated vehicle systems with information that enhances safety and gives traffic managers information that will help improve mobility, shorten travel time, and reduce the environmental impact of highway traffic.

 

FHWA-HRT-17-044 PDF Cover Image

 

 

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