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Federal Highway Administration Research and Technology
Coordinating, Developing, and Delivering Highway Transportation Innovations

 
FACT SHEET
This fact sheet is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
Publication Number:  FHWA-HRT-17-051    Date:  June 2017
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-17-051
Date: June 2017

 

Logo. The Exploratory Advanced Research Program's logo of a satellite over a highway-representing operating systems and reducing congestion.

The Exploratory Advanced Research Program

Advanced Vehicle Tracking Technologies

Sensing and Monitoring Individual Vehicles in Traffic Flow

 

Exploratory Advanced Research - Next Generation Transportation Solutions

PDF Version (259 KB)

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Battery-powered AVTS radar housed in weatherproof case on adjustable-height tower.
Battery-powered AVTS radar housed in weatherproof case on adjustable-height tower.
Source: FHWA.

As the Nation moves into a future of increased automated traffic technologies, transportation managers will need new tools to monitor traffic and control flow. Effective traffic management will require sensing and monitoring systems that provide information at the level of individual vehicles. Because of this, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Exploratory Advanced Research (EAR) Program is supporting research that uses ultra wideband (UWB) radar to identify and track individual vehicles as they move through traffic. The Advanced Vehicle Tracking System (AVTS) project, conducted by Honeywell Corporation and Time Domain Holdings, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota, will recognize and track individual vehicles, rather than aggregated vehicle patterns, and will work without relying on vehicle-based technology that provides information about location or movement. Small-scale highway tests of AVTS show that the system can sense individual vehicles and identify them based on size and movement. Further refinement of the technology will provide managers with an important new tool to improve traffic monitoring capabilities.

 

The Need for Improved Vehicle Sensing

Current vehicle sensing relies on three technologies, each with technical shortcomings that limit their ability to monitor and track the demands of automated highways and traffic management.

 

FHWA-HRT-17-051 PDF Cover Image

 

 

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