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Publication Number:  FHWA-HRT-18-001    Date:  Autumn 2017
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-18-001
Issue No: Vol. 81 No. 3
Date: Autumn 2017

 

Focus on Freight: Article 3

Delivering The Goods

by Tamiko Burnell, Antonio Santalucia, and Alexander Epstein

USDOT and its partners are working to improve the movement of freight in growing urban areas across the country.

Chris Eaves, Seattle DOT
Cities face the ongoing challenge of accommodating increasing freight traffic on the same routes with other modes of travel. Here, a bicyclist is using a dedicated bike lane along a roadway heavily used by trucks in Seattle, WA.
Cities face the ongoing challenge of accommodating increasing freight traffic on the same routes with other modes of travel. Here, a bicyclist is using a dedicated bike lane along a roadway heavily used by trucks in Seattle, WA.

Four out of five Americans live and work in metropolitan areas. Therefore, while freight mobility is a national challenge, the flow of freight to, within, and from cities is critical to modern society. By 2045, the U.S. economy is expected to increase by about 80 percent, and the Nation’s population is projected to increase by more than 20 percent to about 390 million people.

To support the projected growth in population and economic output, freight tonnage across all modes is expected to increase by roughly 50 percent by the year 2040, or more than double the projected rate of population growth. This growth in overall freight demand will put increased pressure on transportation infrastructure throughout the country, but it will have a disproportionate impact on metropolitan areas, where most of the population growth is expected to occur.

Fortunately, to facilitate the movement of goods in cities, a range of strategies is available for State and local transportation agencies to implement, in coordination with private-sector freight shippers, carriers, and logistics providers.

The terms city, urban, and metropolitan can have specific meanings when used by USDOT, the Census Bureau, and other agencies. Here these terms are used interchangeably to refer to densely settled areas where freight pickups and deliveries are more likely to affect other roadway users.

The U.S. Department of Transportation is working with its partners across the country and around the globe to identify, promote, and implement effective strategies to facilitate urban freight flows.

Importance of Urban Goods Movement

The efficient movement of goods is a crucial foundation for the Nation’s modern economy. However, vehicles carrying goods in an urban environment must share the transportation network with travel by pedestrians, bicyclists, buses, and passenger vehicles. In addition, freight vehicles, even those traveling around or through a city to reach another destination, can be affected by or contribute to the same congestion that delays other urban travelers.

Many of the country’s primary gateways for international trade are located in metropolitan areas, increasing the challenge of managing reliable and efficient freight movements. Fourteen of the country’s 25 most populous metropolitan areas are home to a major trade gateway, typically a marine port or airport. The carriers moving freight to and from these gateways must contend with the congestion in these areas–while contributing to that same congestion.

Urban areas also face new challenges from the rapid growth of e-commerce. Each year, an increasing amount of freight is delivered directly to individuals at home or work rather than to retail stores, resulting in changes to truck volumes and travel patterns. This trend is rippling through the freight industry. For example, the total shipping/package volume of the U.S. Postal Service has increased from 3.3 billion pieces in 2011 to 4.5 billion in 2015. In addition, retailers are building more distribution and fulfillment centers in or near urban areas to respond to growth in expedited deliveries (such as same-day or next-day deliveries).

Alison Conway, City University of New York
Growth in e-commerce has led to increased volumes of freight deliveries to residences. This parcel delivery truck is parked on a sidewalk in New York City while delivering packages to an apartment building.
Growth in e-commerce has led to increased volumes of freight deliveries to residences. This parcel delivery truck is parked on a sidewalk in New York City while delivering packages to an apartment building.

“Freight trips are rising steadily as online shopping grows,” says Michael Replogle, deputy commissioner for policy at the New York City Department of Transportation. “The number of deliveries to residences is up 30 percent in just 5 years.”

Addressing the Challenges

In coordination with private sector partners, State and local transportation agencies can implement strategies to facilitate the movement of freight in metropolitan areas and reduce its impacts on urban residents and other travelers. These strategies range widely, from stakeholder engagement to zoning and land-use decisions to parking enforcement. Agencies may consider strategies in such disciplines as operations and logistics, safety, and environment and livability.

Operations and Logistics Strategies

Moving freight by truck can lead to increased roadway congestion in certain areas of a city and at certain hours of the day. To address these types of issues, State and local transportation professionals can work with private carriers to implement operations- and logistics-oriented approaches, such as those that seek to reduce the number of truck trips, shift them to offpeak hours, or otherwise minimize their impacts on traffic flow.

© 123RF.com
Competing uses of curbsides, including space for loading and unloading of freight vehicles, is a common issue during deliveries. Here, a truck passes a curbside space dedicated to bicycle parking (in the blue rack) in Portland, OR.
Competing uses of curbsides, including space for loading and unloading of freight vehicles, is a common issue during deliveries. Here, a truck passes a curbside space dedicated to bicycle parking (in the blue rack) in Portland, OR.

Operations strategies include actions by public agencies to facilitate first- and last-mile goods movement in urban areas. These tactics involve making changes to how freight transportation uses public roadways, such as designating truck routes and establishing curbside loading zones. Logistics strategies involve changes in the practices of freight carriers, shippers, and receivers that provide public benefits, such as reduced congestion or emissions. What follows are descriptions of some operations- and logistics-oriented approaches.

Loading Zone Management

One of the many challenges faced by truck drivers making first- and last-mile freight movements in cities is the scarcity of available loading areas (both onstreet and offstreet). In metropolitan areas, the competition for curb space is usually intense, particularly in commercial districts. In addition, zoning requirements might not call for builders to include adequate offstreet loading areas, buildings may predate such zoning requirements, or carriers might not want to use the offstreet space provided if it increases the amount of time they have to spend per delivery. Any of these issues can affect the demand for curbside space.

When there is not an adequate supply of loading zone spaces or the spaces provided are considered inconvenient by carriers, freight drivers often create their own parking solutions. Methods such as double-parking by delivery vehicles can reduce traffic flow and exacerbate traffic congestion. These methods also can create safety risks. These problems can be particularly acute at urban locations that generate a high amount of both freight and pedestrian traffic.

Chris Eaves, Seattle DOT
Photo. A freight truck delivers goods to an urban store front during nighttime hours.
Researchers around the world are testing ways of enabling more urban receivers to accept deliveries during off-peak hours.

As part of an overall strategy to manage curbside loading areas, public agencies can consider increasing the supply of loading zone space and improving the enforcement of curbside signage and regulations. Cities also can balance the demand for use of curbside lanes by dedicating lanes for different uses at various times of the day.

Transportation and planning agencies should collect data on the specific needs of an area. Changes to loading zone policies and locations are more effective when they are based on surveys of curb use and information from nearby freight receivers.

In addition to increasing loading zone supply, public agencies can also consider managing demand, such as by using metered loading zones. For example, since 2015, the District Department of Transportation in Washington, DC, has required commercial vehicles to pay for the use of loading zones. To park in a loading zone, a commercial vehicle operator must either display a daily or annual permit on the vehicle, or pay using a phone-based application immediately after parking. The metering program also generates valuable data for the department on the demand for loading zones in different parts of the city and at various times of the day.

“Curbside space is a finite resource and demand for it only continues to increase,” says Laura Richards, a transportation planner with the District Department of Transportation. “Understanding loading demand and carrier behavior and making informed policy and curbside decisions has implications for congestion and safety as well as curbside and loading space.”

Alternative Times and Locations

By changing when or where deliveries occur, shippers can minimize some of the impacts of freight traffic.

Off-Hour Delivery. Voluntary off-hour delivery programs aim to reduce congestion and pollution from truck traffic by encouraging urban receivers–sometimes with financial incentives–to shift daytime deliveries to offpeak or “off” hours (roughly 7 p.m. to 6 a.m.). This type of program can be an appropriate strategy for urban areas, such as downtown commercial districts, with high levels of truck traffic and roadway congestion.

Off-hour delivery is an active area of study. In the United States, the Federal Highway Administration has funded several research projects and pilot tests in New York City; Orlando and Pensacola, FL; and Washington, DC. Several cities abroad, including Copenhagen, Denmark; Sao Paulo, Brazil; and Stockholm, Sweden, have also conducted pilot tests to analyze the potential benefits of off-hour delivery.

Alternative Pickup and Delivery Locations. When recipients are not home to receive packages, carriers must make return trips, increasing the cost of delivery. Dropping off packages at an alternative location can reduce truck traffic and delivery costs for carriers, while providing convenience for consumers. Ideally, the availability of these alternative locations also reduces vehicle miles traveled to some degree, thus alleviating congestion and reducing emissions.

Alternative locations can be neighborhood businesses with extended hours (such as convenience stores), or unstaffed parcel lockers located outdoors, in public facilities (such as train stations), or near accessible neighborhood businesses. Some carriers and online retailers already have installed parcel lockers in such locations. Public agencies can work with carriers and facility owners to encourage the placement of parcel lockers in places that are likely to reduce vehicle trips or vehicle miles traveled.

New York City’s Off-Hour Delivery Program

New York City has implemented a program to encourage shifting freight deliveries to the overnight, offpeak hours. After a successful pilot phase with about 30 receivers concluded in 2010, FHWA sponsored an implementation phase that ran from 2011 to 2013. Researchers estimated that during the second phase, more than 400 businesses across Midtown and Lower Manhattan shifted portions of their deliveries to off hours. The New York City Department of Transportation (NYCDOT) is actively seeking additional carriers and receivers that are interested in pursuing off-hour deliveries.

In the pilot phase, half the participating establishments used staffed off-hour deliveries while the other half used unassisted off-hour deliveries. At the end of the pilot, all the receivers maintaining staffed deliveries reverted to daytime deliveries. In contrast, almost all of the receivers that used unassisted deliveries during the pilot test continued doing so after the pilot ended. Interviews revealed that these receivers stayed with unassisted off-hour delivery because of the superior reliability in delivery times, which enabled them to reduce their inventory stocks.

NYCDOT estimates that because of the implementation phase, 40 to 50 daily delivery tours in Manhattan have switched to offpeak hours, for a total carrier savings of more than $2.25 million annually. Researchers for the program estimated that more than 20 percent of Manhattan’s truck traffic could be shifted to offpeak hours, and that a shift of that magnitude would generate economic benefits of $150 million to $200 million in travel time savings and productivity increases.

 

Freight carriers and retailers have begun installing parcel lockers in private establishments, such as this one in a convenience store, and in public locations.
Freight carriers and retailers have begun installing parcel lockers in private establishments, such as this one in a convenience store, and in public locations.

 

John Majors, Aerial & Architectural Photos of NJ
By locating the Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility, shown here, at a marine terminal in Brooklyn, New York City shifted some shipments of recycled materials from trucks to barges.
By locating the Sunset Park Material Recovery Facility, shown here, at a marine terminal in Brooklyn, New York City shifted some shipments of recycled materials from trucks to barges.

Changes at Urban Ports

Gate hours for marine terminals affect truck traffic around ports located near metropolitan areas. For example, trucks queuing at terminal gates can affect traffic flow on nearby streets.

Some port authorities have instituted offpeak (evening and weekend) hours for terminal access. For example, the OffPeak program at the Ports of Long Beach and LosAngeles in California charges a fee on containers moved during peak hours, which provides a financial incentive for trucks to visit the ports during offpeak hours. Roughly half of daily truck-borne container traffic now occurs through the OffPeak gates. Other terminal operators are moving to appointment systems to spread out truck traffic and reduce traffic congestion near their gates.

Many factors influence the transportation modes used for any given freight shipment. However, for freight movements that begin or end in cities, finding modal alternatives that effectively compete with trucks can be difficult.

Some agencies have been able to induce mode shifts in urban areas using public investments and other policy tools. In New York City, the construction of a solid waste recycling facility at the South Brooklyn Marine Terminal has enabled the shipping of recycled materials by barge instead of by truck. The New York City Economic Development Corporation estimates that using barges instead of trucks reduces truck travel by 260,000 vehicle miles (420,000 vehicle kilometers) annually.

© 123RF.com
Photo. A freight truck with a load of material is parked near a construction
Research funded by the European Commission is investigating how to reduce truck trips related to deliveries of construction materials by using urban consolidation centers.

“Our waterfront site allows us to both receive and export the majority of materials by barge throughout the New York metropolitan area, removing trucks from city streets and essentially adding floating mobile storage capacity in a city where space is always at a premium,” says Sam Silver, the education and outreach coordinator for Sims Municipal Recycling, the operator of the recycling facility.

In hopes of further reducing truck traffic, the New York City Economic Development Corporation is engaged with other partners, including the U.S. Maritime Administration, to bring more maritime cargo operations to this location.

Freight Consolidation

Truck side guards, such as those shown on this delivery vehicle in Cambridge, MA, are vehicle-based safety devices designed to keep pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists from being swept under and run over by a large truck’s rear wheels in a side-impact collision.
Truck side guards, such as those shown on this delivery vehicle in Cambridge, MA, are vehicle-based safety devices designed to keep pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorcyclists from being swept under and run over by a large truck's rear wheels in a side-impact collision.

Some urban freight strategies seek to reduce freight traffic by consolidating freight into fewer but fuller vehicle trips. One of these strategies is to establish urban consolidation centers, which are logistics facilities that collect freight from multiple carriers and consolidate them into fewer vehicle trips to an area. By reducing the vehicle miles traveled by freight vehicles in and around the target area, consolidation centers can reduce congestion, noise, and emissions of air pollutants. This strategy can further increase environmental benefits by using low-emission vehicles for the last delivery leg from the consolidation center.

These centers are not common in the United States, but there are numerous consolidation centers operating in Europe, including a dozen located in and around London, England, that serve the construction sector. The European Commission is actively funding research and pilot testing of urban consolidation centers. One of the commission’s ongoing projects, titled Sustainable Urban Consolidation Centers for Construction (SUCCESS), is testing different models for consolidation centers for construction materials. Another project, known as CityLab, is identifying opportunities to consolidate freight shipments to large municipal organizations (such as local authorities, hospitals, and universities) in the United Kingdom.

Safety Strategies

Trucks present many safety challenges for operators and other road users. The sizes and shapes of trucks make it difficult, if not impossible, for a truck operator to see all areas of the roadway adjacent to the vehicle. Pedestrians, bicyclists, and motorists caught in these blind spots run a greater risk of being involved in a crash related to truck turns or maneuvers.

Under-riding during collisions presents a safety risk because of the high ground clearance and long wheelbase of trucks. Under-riding occurs when a pedestrian, bicyclist, or other road user becomes caught beneath a truck’s wheel during a collision. This type of crash may occur when, for example, a truck makes a right-hand turn while a bicyclist is riding along the truck’s right (passenger) side in a bike lane or on a roadway shoulder.

Cities around the world use a variety of strategies to make truck interactions with other road users safer. The following are a few examples.

Vehicle Features

The size of medium- and heavy-duty trucks limits the driver’s view around the vehicle significantly more than is true in smaller vehicles. A truck driver must depend on indirect vision, using mirrors and other devices to see many of the areas abutting the vehicle. A 2006 analysis of national crash data found that 20 percent of truck crashes occur in configurations where the visibility limitations of truck drivers might have been an important factor contributing to the crash.

Federal regulations require that trucks with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 10,000 pounds (4,500 kilograms) have a rearview planar mirror on each side of the cab, but the standard does not require any other mirror type. Some States and municipalities have enacted requirements for additional mirrors on large trucks to increase driver awareness and help prevent fatal crashes with bicyclists and pedestrians, particularly in urban areas. For example, the States of New York, Oregon, and Washington have required additional mirrors on certain types of trucks registered in those States.

Truck side guards also can increase safety. These devices cover the exposed space between the front and rear wheels of a truck or trailer, helping shield pedestrians and cyclists from being swept underneath the truck’s wheels. Side guards can be installed on existing trucks or incorporated into designs for new vehicles. Following a national mandate in 1986 for side guards in the United Kingdom, cyclist fatalities in certain types of side-impact collisions with trucks decreased by 61 percent and pedestrian fatalities by 20 percent.

In the United States, the Boston City Council passed the first ordinance requiring truck side guards in 2014. Since then, a growing number of cities have adopted the use of side guards by municipal truck fleets. Cities include San Francisco, CA; Washington, DC; Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, FL; Chicago, IL; Cambridge and Somerville, MA; New York, NY; Portland, OR; and Seattle, WA.

“In Boston, we looked at the crash data and knew we needed to do something to address the conflict between trucks and vulnerable road users,” says Kristopher Carter of the Boston Mayor’s Office of New Urban Mechanics. “If I were to provide one piece of advice to our peer cities–don’t wait. [Sideguards] have real safety impacts for roadway users who need the most support.”

Driver Training

Some cities are encouraging or requiring certain populations of truck drivers who operate in cities to take specialized training on safe operations in urban environments. For example, the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA) developed a safety curriculum and video training to reduce the number of bicycle and pedestrian fatalities caused by collisions with large vehicles. SFMTA requires city-employed, city-contracted, and city-permitted drivers of vehicles over 10,000 pounds (4,500 kilograms) to complete the training. The program also encourages private companies to adopt the training and to incorporate safety principles of urban driving into California’s curriculum for commercial driver licensing. More than 4,500 drivers completed the SFMTA training between July 2015 and September 2016.

Kevin McWeeney, Massport
As part of the expansion of its Conley container terminal in South Boston, Massport is building a new access road, shown here crossing a waterway, to remove trucks from local streets.
As part of the expansion of its Conley container terminal in South Boston, Massport is building a new access road, shown here crossing a waterway, to remove trucks from local streets.

Environmental and Livability Strategies

Metropolitan freight movements can have environmental (emissions) and quality-of-life (noise) impacts on urban neighborhoods. On a national scale, diesel-powered freight vehicles are among the largest contributors to freight-related emissions. These vehicles have a longer operational life than others and can stay in operation for 30 years or more.

Newer diesel-powered freight vehicles and vessels are far cleaner than older diesel models. However, the stricter standards for new vehicles and vessels do not address emissions from the millions of older models still in operation. At the city level, the vehicles used to move freight can concentrate air emissions near ports, distribution centers, and other locations that attract large volumes of freight traffic.

Noise from freight facilities and vehicles is another potential community concern arising in urban areas. Noise results from various sources, including truck engines, refrigeration units for trailers, backing alarms, and loading and unloading activities. Nighttime noise also could be an obstacle to off-hour delivery.

However, transportation agencies and trucking companies can reduce or mitigate the impacts of emissions and noise. Helpful measures by fleet owners include installing idle-reduction equipment on trucks and training drivers to minimize idling while vehicles are stopped. Fleet owners can also deploy alternative-fuel vehicles that produce lower or no tailpipe emissions while having the added benefit of being quieter than traditional diesel models.

In particular, the areas around urban ports face environmental and livability concerns because of the high concentrations of freight vehicles. Many urban ports in the United States are taking steps to reduce their impacts on neighboring communities. For example, the Massachusetts Port Authority (Massport) is addressing livability concerns as part of its planned expansion of container operations at its Conley Terminal in South Boston.

Massport is implementing facility and operational improvements at the terminal, including adding a new access road that will remove as many as 900 truck trips per day from nearby streets. The terminal will have expanded queuing areas for trucks, which will reduce the incidences of freight vehicles idling on city streets near residences. In addition, Massport is installing a sound attenuation wall that will serve as a significant noise and visual buffer for the adjacent residents. Finally, the project includes the creation of a 4.2-acre (1.7-hectare) park, a new amenity for the neighborhood.

Kevin McWeeney, Massport
As part of its expansion of the Conley container terminal, Massport is constructing a park and a sound attenuation wall, visible to the right behind a row of trees.
As part of its expansion of the Conley container terminal, Massport is constructing a park and a sound attenuation wall, visible to the right behind a row of trees.

“We are proud of the work we are doing to further container operations at the Conley Terminal,” says Massport CEO Thomas P. Glynn, “and to alleviate the environmental and noise concerns of residents, while also providing new green space for the community.”

Communication, Coordination, and Collaboration

Moving freight in urban areas involves coordination among a wide range of stakeholders in both the public and private sectors. Each of these stakeholders has a unique set of authorities or responsibilities for decision making. In addition, stakeholders often have different goals that might not align precisely.

To increase the chances of success, any strategies to address the challenges of urban freight movements should be implemented in collaboration with local freight stakeholders. Additional opportunities to improve communication, coordination, and collaboration among freight stakeholders in urban areas also are helpful in achieving goals.

State and Regional Freight Plans. Developing State and regional freight plans provides stakeholders an opportunity to bring their concerns and solutions to the table, share priorities, and identify areas of focus. The 2015 Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act requires that States seeking to continue using funding from the National Highway Freight Program must develop a FAST Act-compliant State freight plan by December 4, 2017; guidance is available at http://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight.

Freight Advisory Committees. Freight advisory committees offer a structured forum for relevant stakeholders to provide their insights and expertise to freight-related issues, priorities, projects, and funding needs in a State or region. The FAST Act encourages State departments of transportation to establish a State freight advisory committee consisting of a representative cross section of public and private freight stakeholders. Many metropolitan planning organizations also have freight advisory bodies of some kind.

Designation of Critical Urban Freight Corridors. The FAST Act provides an opportunity for States and metropolitan planning organizations to designate a limited number of road miles as critical urban freight corridors. These corridors provide critical connectivity to the National Highway Freight Network. The process of designating the corridors is another opportunity for freight stakeholders to communicate, coordinate, and collaborate on decisions that affect the mobility of freight in their cities or regions. No deadline exists for designating critical urban freight corridors–FHWA considers the designations on a rolling basis.

Public-Private Partnerships and Joint Initiatives. In some areas of the country, private companies involved in transportation and logistics have joined together to advance their mutual interests, including providing information for public decision making that affects freight transportation. Public agencies can tap the collective expertise of such organizations to inform investment and funding choices for transportation infrastructure and other freight-related policy decisions.

In Indiana, the Conexus Indiana Logistics Council (CILC) is a statewide partnership of logistics executives and stakeholders working together to implement strategic initiatives around infrastructure, innovation, public policy, and workforce development needs. CILC serves as a bridge between the private sector and government in terms of freight planning and funding. The Indiana Department of Transportation works closely with the council to ensure that the State’s projects meet freight needs. For example, the department is working with CILC to find smaller projects in cities and towns that can be completed quickly but provide a significant improvement in freight mobility.

Downtown Delivery Symposiums. With support from FHWA and the Institute of Transportation Engineers, Philadelphia, PA, and Baltimore, MD, have held events to bring freight stakeholders together to discuss freight issues in their commercial districts. These downtown delivery symposiums offered freight stakeholders from both public and private sectors an unprecedented opportunity to air concerns and discuss potential solutions. FHWA is actively seeking additional cities that would like technical assistance to host a downtown delivery symposium of their own.

Preparing for the Future

USDOT anticipates that national and international trends will push freight volumes higher, with the majority of future population growth occurring in metropolitan areas. These trends make it increasingly important for transportation decisionmakers to focus on freight mobility in metropolitan areas.

Transportation agencies and communities can collaborate to find solutions for urban freight movement, including managing the routing, timing, and flow of trucks serving urban ports like this one.
Transportation agencies and communities can collaborate to find solutions for urban freight movement, including managing the routing, timing, and flow of trucks serving urban ports like this one.

To meet the freight challenges ahead, transportation agencies at all levels will need to consider the full gamut of strategies. Some of these include land-use planning, zoning, pricing of roadways and parking, and the use of intelligent transportation systems. In addition, as connected and automated vehicle technologies mature, there will likely be opportunities to harness them to improve freight mobility in metropolitan areas. Nevertheless, the strategies outlined here are ones that transportation agencies can implement now.

FHWA is developing two primers that will detail strategies to help State and local agencies tackle the challenges of urban freight movements. FHWA will continue to work with its State and local partners, as well as researchers and agencies from other countries, to identify and promote effective strategies for managing urban freight.

FHWA is also advancing urban freight research through partnerships with the European Commission and ongoing collaboration with the Transportation Research Board’s (TRB) Standing Committee on Urban Freight Transportation. “Our ongoing partnership with FHWA provides our far-reaching research community a linkage to practitioners,” says Bill Eisele, chair of the TRB Urban Freight Transportation Committee and senior research engineer at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute. “These fruitful, two-way dialogues are the first step to successfully implementing urban freight strategies and innovations.”

Cities around the world face the common challenges of feeding, clothing, and supplying people and businesses. In response to these challenges, FHWA is developing resources to improve truck parking, performance measures, off-hours delivery, and freight data.

“Our urban areas must be prepared to accommodate the population growth anticipated for the coming decades,” says Caitlin Hughes Rayman, director of FHWA’s Office of Freight Management and Operations. “To thrive, cities require a resilient, efficient, affordable, and safe transportation system. In light of these needs, it is imperative that FHWA and its partners continue to share innovations in goods movement to preserve and enhance the quality of life for citizens here and across the globe.”


Tamiko Burnell is a transportation specialist with FHWA’s Office of Freight Management and Operations.

Antonio Santalucia is a senior analyst with Digital iBiz, a contractor to USDOT’s Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.

Alexander Epstein is a general engineer in the Energy Analysis and Sustainability Division at USDOT’s Volpe National Transportation Systems Center.

For more information, visit https://ops.fhwa.dot.gov/freight/technology/urban_goods/index.htm or contact Tamiko Burnell at 202–366–1200 or tamiko.burnell@dot.gov.

 

 

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