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Transportation Performance Management

 

State Highway Infrastructure Report - Virginia

In the line graphs below, FHWA has shifted the "Year" label in the x-axis back by one year, from Data Reporting Year to Data Collection Year. More information

The information displayed is provided by the State Department of Transportation (DOT) in their 2018 Baseline Performance Report, 2019 Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) data submittal, and 2020 Mid Performance Period (MPP) Progress Report and has not been edited by FHWA. Any questions about individual State reports should be directed to the respective State DOT.

Please note: FHWA has posted data from State DOT reports to help bring context to their performance targets. This data may result in some discrepancies among published State DOT performance data due to data sources and reporting years used when establishing the performance targets.

Significant Progress Determination

Using data from the 2020 MPP Progress Report, FHWA has determined whether a State DOT has made significant progress toward achieving its individual targets for five National Highway Performance Program (NHPP) measures and one National Highway Freight Program (NHFP) measure, as described in 23 CFR 490.109.

Full Significant Progress Determination Table

  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      Virginia % Interstate Lane Miles Good Condition


  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- 57.5 57.9 -- --
    Target -- -- -- -- 45.0

    Behind the data: For the first performance period only, baseline condition and 2-year targets are not required for the Pavements on the Interstate System measures.


  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition

    Current performance, performance data from recent history, and predicted performance trends over the next ten years were used for the development of Virginia’s pavement targets for both interstates and non-Interstate NHS pavements. Pavement performance models used in the pavement management system assume average pavement deterioration and current levels of pavement funding available in future years. A number of factors may affect future performance, including any significant cost increases for materials, higher load levels from allowing heavier trucks on roads, and extreme weather conditions, particularly more severe than normal freeze-thaw cycles. Impacts from these factors are hard to quantify and cannot be predicted by the models.

    Additional details of the target setting methodology and analyses are documented in a technical memorandum titled “Federal Pavement Performance Measure Modeling,” which was developed in support of Virginia’s Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). This document has been shared with FHWA’s Virginia Division Office.

    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2019, 2020 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      Virginia % Interstate Lane Miles in Poor Condition


  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- 0.3 0.3 -- --
    Target -- -- -- -- 3.0
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period only, baseline condition and 2-year targets are not required for the Pavements on the Interstate System measures.


  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition

    Current performance, performance data from recent history, and predicted performance trends over the next ten years were used for the development of Virginia’s pavement targets for both interstates and non-Interstate NHS pavements. Pavement performance models used in the pavement management system assume average pavement deterioration and current levels of pavement funding available in future years. A number of factors may affect future performance, including any significant cost increases for materials, higher load levels from allowing heavier trucks on roads, and extreme weather conditions, particularly more severe than normal freeze-thaw cycles. Impacts from these factors are hard to quantify and cannot be predicted by the models.

    Additional details of the target setting methodology and analyses are documented in a technical memorandum titled “Federal Pavement Performance Measure Modeling,” which was developed in support of Virginia’s Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). This document has been shared with FHWA’s Virginia Division Office.

    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2019, 2020 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      Virginia % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Good Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- -- 36.7 -- --
    Target -- -- 25.0 -- 25.0
  • Behind the data: Because Virginia State DOT has established targets based on full-distress plus IRI data, FHWA has calculated the value for Actual using full-distress plus IRI data for assessing target achievement.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    Virginia’s targets on non-interstate NHS roads are based on all distresses (IRI, cracking, rutting/faulting). Virginia currently reports all distress data to FHWA on the interstates and on the non-interstate NHS routes through the HPMS data submission. VDOT calculated the baseline for all distresses for the non-interstate NHS in good condition to be 35.4% and in the poor condition to be 0.9%. Please note that the baseline in fields P6 and P10 were pre-populated based on previously submitted HPMS data using IRI only. VDOT's calculation of the baseline using IRI only is 54% for good and 9.2% for poor.

    Current performance, performance data from recent history, and predicted performance trends over the next ten years were used for the development of Virginia’s pavement targets for both interstates and non-Interstate NHS pavements. Pavement performance models used in the pavement management system assume average pavement deterioration and current levels of pavement funding available in future years. A number of factors may affect future performance, including any significant cost increases for materials, higher load levels from allowing heavier trucks on roads, and extreme weather conditions, particularly more severe than normal freeze-thaw cycles. Impacts from these factors are hard to quantify and cannot be predicted by the models.

    Additional details of the target setting methodology and analyses are documented in a technical memorandum titled “Federal Pavement Performance Measure Modeling,” which was developed in support of Virginia’s Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). This document has been shared with FHWA’s Virginia Division Office.

    Performance at the mid period is exceeding the target, with the statewide percentage of pavements on the Non-Interstate NHS in Good condition based on full distress at 36.7 percent, which is higher than the full distress-based target of 25 percent. The results are as expected based on VDOT’s maintenance strategy and funding.

    VDOT annually invests more than $400 million to improve pavement condition in accordance with the recommendations of the agency’s Pavement Management System, the investment strategies of the Comprehensive Review, and performance levels projected in the TAMP.

    As part of the Comprehensive Review, VDOT analyzed the condition of the pavements and funding strategies for the roadways it maintains. This review resulted in new statewide performance targets for the Interstate, primary, and secondary pavements maintained by VDOT. Although not specifically designed for the purpose of meeting federal performance targets, this strategy is expected to help meet Virginia’s current performance targets based on federal measures.

    It should be noted that VDOT maintains an extensive network of roads and NHS is a small part of it. Analysis was conducted and maintenance activities were developed for the entire network. As a part of the overall network, the NHS sections are expected to meet the performance targets

    N/A
    As part of the Comprehensive Review, VDOT analyzed the condition of the pavements and funding strategies for the roadways it maintains. This review resulted in new statewide performance targets for the Interstate, primary, and secondary systems maintained by VDOT. Although not specifically designed for the purpose of meeting federal performance targets, this strategy is expected to help meet Virginia’s current performance targets based on federal measures.

    The Comprehensive Review moves Virginia toward a more balanced asset management approach to include the entire VDOT-maintained network. This investment strategy is intended to achieve long-term (at least 20 years) sustainable performance for pavements. The effort to implement this strategy is underway. The Comprehensive Review also aligns with Virginia’s TAMP and the projected performance envisioned over the next 10 years.

    As a reminder, in the 2018 Baseline Performance Period Report, Virginia reported the 2- and 4-year targets for Non-Interstate NHS pavements based on all four distresses (cracking, IRI, rutting/faulting) to be consistent with target-setting for the Interstate measures -

    4-Year Target for Non-Interstate NHS Pavement in Good Condition 25.0%

  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2020 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      Virginia % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Good Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 54.5 54.3 54.4 -- --
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period, FHWA has calculated the values for Baseline and Actual using International Roughness Index (IRI) only (or Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) values for road sections where speed is less than 40 mph) for assessing condition change from the baseline.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only)

    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2018, 2019, 2020 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      Virginia % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Poor Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- -- 0.9 -- --
    Target -- -- 5.0 -- 5.0
  • Behind the data: Because Virginia State DOT has established targets based on full-distress plus IRI data, FHWA has calculated the value for Actual using full-distress plus IRI data for assessing target achievement.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    Virginia’s targets on non-interstate NHS roads are based on all distresses (IRI, cracking, rutting/faulting). Virginia currently reports all distress data to FHWA on the interstates and on the non-interstate NHS routes through the HPMS data submission. VDOT calculated the baseline for all distresses for the non-interstate NHS in good condition to be 35.4% and in the poor condition to be 0.9%. Please note that the baseline in fields P6 and P10 were pre-populated based on previously submitted HPMS data using IRI only. VDOT's calculation of the baseline using IRI only is 54% for good and 9.2% for poor.

    Current performance, performance data from recent history, and predicted performance trends over the next ten years were used for the development of Virginia’s pavement targets for both interstates and non-Interstate NHS pavements. Pavement performance models used in the pavement management system assume average pavement deterioration and current levels of pavement funding available in future years. A number of factors may affect future performance, including any significant cost increases for materials, higher load levels from allowing heavier trucks on roads, and extreme weather conditions, particularly more severe than normal freeze-thaw cycles. Impacts from these factors are hard to quantify and cannot be predicted by the models.

    Additional details of the target setting methodology and analyses are documented in a technical memorandum titled “Federal Pavement Performance Measure Modeling,” which was developed in support of Virginia’s Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP). This document has been shared with FHWA’s Virginia Division Office.

    Performance at the mid period is exceeding the target, with the statewide percentage of pavements on the Non-Interstate NHS in Poor condition based on full distress at 0.9 percent, which is lower (better) than the full distress-based target of 5 percent. The results are as expected based on VDOT’s maintenance strategy and funding.

    VDOT annually invests more than $400 million to improve pavement condition in accordance with the recommendations of the agency’s Pavement Management System, the investment strategies of the Comprehensive Review, and performance levels projected in the TAMP.

    As part of the Comprehensive Review, VDOT analyzed the condition of the pavements and funding strategies for the roadways it maintains. This review resulted in new statewide performance targets for the Interstate, primary, and secondary pavements maintained by VDOT. Although not specifically designed for the purpose of meeting federal performance targets, this strategy is expected to help meet Virginia’s current performance targets based on federal measures.

    It should be noted that VDOT maintains an extensive network of roads and NHS is a small part of it. Analysis was conducted and maintenance activities were developed for the entire network. As a part of the overall network, the NHS sections are expected to meet the performance targets.

    N/A
    As part of the Comprehensive Review, VDOT analyzed the condition of the pavements and funding strategies for the roadways it maintains. This review resulted in new statewide performance targets for the Interstate, primary, and secondary pavements maintained by VDOT. Although not specifically designed for the purpose of meeting federal performance targets, this strategy is expected to help meet Virginia’s current performance targets based on federal measures.

    The Comprehensive Review moves Virginia toward a more balanced asset management approach to include the entire VDOT-maintained network. This investment strategy is intended to achieve long-term (at least 20 years) sustainable performance for pavements. The effort to implement this strategy is underway. The Comprehensive Review also aligns with Virginia’s TAMP and the projected performance envisioned over the next 10 years.

    As a reminder, in the 2018 Baseline Performance Period Report, Virginia reported the 2- and 4-year targets for Non-Interstate NHS pavements based on all four distresses (cracking, IRI, rutting/faulting) to be consistent with target-setting for the Interstate measures -

    4-Year Target for Non-Interstate NHS Pavement in Poor Condition 5.0%

  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2017, 2018, 2019 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      Virginia % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Poor Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 9.1 9.0 8.9 -- --
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period, FHWA has calculated the values for Baseline and Actual using International Roughness Index (IRI) only (or Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) values for road sections where speed is less than 40 mph) for assessing condition change from the baseline.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only)

    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2018, 2019, 2020 HPMS Data Submittal

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      Virginia % Deck Area in Good Condition on NHS Bridges


  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 33.6 32.5 31.8 -- --
    Target -- -- 33.5 -- 30.5

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition

    Using VDOT’s Structure and Bridge AASHTOWare Bridge Management Database, historical bridge performance and expected deterioration rates were compared to existing programmed bridge work and anticipated maintenance and construction funding over the next four years. Based on this information, the established 2- and 4-year targets are consistent with a minor decrease in the share of NHS bridge deck area classified in good condition through 2019 and 2021.

    Virginia expects the percentage of Good deck area on the NHS to decrease steadily over the next 10 years, which is reflected in its 2 and 4 year targets. These targets are entirely appropriate given available funding, the age and condition of the inventory, and, most importantly, the need to minimize life-cycle costs. In order for a structure to attain and sustain Good status, replacement of one or more major components (if not the entire bridge) is usually necessary. Good stewardship of the bridge inventory requires Virginia to be highly strategic in implementing the most cost-effective interventions on its bridges. Generally speaking, the life-cycle cost of improving a bridge from the Fair condition category to the Good condition category is much higher than improving and preserving a Fair bridge without changing its condition category (allowing it to stay Fair). Rather than spending funds unnecessarily to replace components that can and should be preserved, Virginia is choosing to minimize life-cycle costs. This leads to replacing bridges and bridge components only when necessary and rehabilitating/preserving whenever that is the most effective use of public funds.

    Virginia calculated its baseline condition for percent of deck area of bridges in good condition as 34.5%. Please note that the level of effort to determine the differences in the FHWA calculated vs. the VDOT calculated baseline is deemed significant and may only be a matter of simple issues such as the assumptions utilized.

    Virginia’s progress was approximately as expected, as the statewide bridge effort is focused primarily on rehabilitation of bridges in fair or poor condition rather than on replacement of NHS bridges, which is the primary mechanism for maintaining or increasing the deck area of bridges in Good condition on the NHS. While the overall percentage was lower than anticipated, this was due in part to baseline data issues - the VDOT database had a few errors, and border and federal bridges, when fully accounted for, created a shift in the baseline. The difference between the baseline and Year 2 was about what was anticipated.

    Reviewing previous and current investment strategies provides additional context for Virginia’s 2-year performance. Leading up to this performance period, VDOT’s investment strategy prioritized reducing the number of bridges in poor condition, reducing emphasis on maintaining bridges in good condition. Over the past two years, VDOT completed a comprehensive review of its maintenance and operations program, resulting in a shift in investment strategy. The new strategy supports a more balanced, sustainable program to manage performance over the next 20 years, focusing efforts on bridges on the cusp of falling into poor condition to prevent further deterioration.

    Virginia is adjusting the 4-year target for several reasons. -

    - Virginia's primary funding source for bridge maintenance, the State of Good Repair, is only available for bridges in poor condition, limiting VDOT's ability to maintain bridges in fair and good condition and prevent those structures from falling into worse condition. - Most bridge replacements since 2018 have been on Non-NHS routes. - VDOT is focused on preservation, restoration, and rehabilitation of bridges in fair and poor condition. - As described above, data issues --VDOT's database had a few errors and border and federal bridges, when fully accounted for, created a shift in the baseline--contributed to inflated performance conditions for the baseline year, which influenced how Virginia set its 2- and 4-year targets. In 2019, VDOT completed development of an investment strategy to achieve long-term (at least 20 years) sustainable performance for bridges (structures). As a result of the Comprehensive Review, Virginia has moved toward a more balanced asset management approach to include the entire VDOT-maintained network. Such an approach will enable a sustained program, allowing VDOT to focus limited resources on bridges in poor condition or n the cusp. The effort to implement this strategy is underway.

    Virginia continues to execute its planned preventive maintenance program for good bridges, which includes sweeping, washing, overlays, and joint maintenance. Virginia currently has a significant number of large bridge replacement projects that are being delivered through expansive design-build and public-private partnership contracts. Many of these bridges are scheduled for completion prior to the 4-year reporting date, and will be a significant contributor to increasing the percentage of deck area of bridges on the NHS classified in Good condition.

  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2018, 2019, 2020 NBI Data Submittal

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      Virginia % Deck Area in Poor Condition on NHS Bridges


  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 3.5 3.0 2.6 -- --
    Target -- -- 3.5 -- 3.0

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition

    Using VDOT’s Structure and Bridge AASHTOWare Bridge Management Database, historical bridge performance and expected deterioration rates were compared to existing programmed bridge work and anticipated construction and maintenance funding over the next four years. Based on this information, the 2- and 4-year targets are consistent with continuing improvement (a decrease) in the share of NHS bridge deck area classified in poor condition through 2019 and 2021.

    VDOT continues to address all bridges in its inventory, including NBI bridges on the NHS, in line with the investment strategy identified as a result of the Comprehensive Review. This investment strategy focuses on long-term, sustainable performance and includes an emphasis on preventing bridges in fair condition from falling into poor condition. Several factors have contributed to the reduction in the percentage of deck area of bridges on the NHS classified as in Poor condition, including a steady, reliable funding stream. VDOT has had and will continue to have performance measures for the percentage of poor (structurally deficient) bridges on each highway system. These bridges are addressed through VDOT’s trained bridge crews and by private contractors, paid through its State of Good Repair construction program, which is restricted to deficient bridges and pavements.

    N/A
    VDOT continues to address all bridges in its inventory, including NBI bridges on the NHS. Several factors have contributed to the reduction in the percentage of deck area of bridges on the NHS classified as in Poor condition, including a steady, reliable funding stream. Virginia currently has a significant number of large bridge replacement projects that are being delivered through expansive design-build and public-private partnership contracts. Many of these bridges are scheduled for completion prior to the 4-year reporting date, and will be a significant contributor to increasing the percentage of deck area of bridges on the NHS classified in Good condition.

  • Data Sources:
    Virginia 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    Virginia 2018, 2019, 2020 NBI Data Submittal


Significant Progress Determination

PLEASE NOTE: Each State’s performance target assessment is based on its own State-specific target methodology and program philosophy. Therefore, conclusions should not be drawn based only on the information in the 2020 Mid Performance Period Significant Progress Determination Results table. For example, the State may have set aggressive targets, and not met those targets, while another State may have set more easily attainable targets, and met those targets. FHWA understands that each State’s program is unique and therefore does not prescribe a methodology for States to set targets. States have the flexibility to use the methodology they deem most appropriate when setting their performance targets.

A State has met or made significant progress toward target achievement if “actual” condition/performance is equal to or better than the established two-year target or “actual” condition/performance is better than baseline performance 23 CFR 490.109 (e).

Virginia 2020 Mid Performance Period Significant Progress Determination Results
Measure Area Measures Baseline Target Actual Better than Baseline? Achieved Target? Made Significant Progress? Consequences [23 CFR 490.109(f)]
The condition of pavements on the National Highway System (NHS) (excluding the Interstate) Percentage of pavements of the non-Interstate NHS in Good condition Based only on IRI 54.5 --- 54.4 No --- Yes None
Based on Full Distress + IRI --- 25.0 36.7 --- Yes
Percentage of pavements of the non-Interstate NHS in Poor condition Based only on IRI 9.1 --- 8.9 Yes --- Yes
Based on Full Distress + IRI --- 5.0 0.9 --- Yes
The condition of bridges on the National Highway System Percentage of NHS bridges classified as in Good condition 33.6 33.5 31.8 No No No Additional reporting
Percentage of NHS bridges classified as in Poor condition 3.5 3.5 2.6 Yes Yes Yes
Updated: 03/08/2022
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000