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Transportation Performance Management

 

State Highway Safety Report (2020) - District of Columbia

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The following provides a summary of the Highway Safety Improvement Program’s (HSIP) safety performance measures and State safety performance targets. As per the Safety PM Final Rule, States are required to set annual safety performance targets in the HSIP annual report for the number of fatalities, rate of fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT), number of serious injuries, rate of serious injures per 100 million VMT, and number of non-motorized fatalities and serious injuries. The safety performance targets are based on 5-year rolling averages. States have the flexibility to use the methodology they deem most appropriate. FHWA encourages States to review data sets and trends and consider factors that may affect targets. The safety performance targets should be data-driven, realistic, and attainable and should align with the performance management framework and legislative intent.

A State Department of Transportation (DOT) has met or made significant progress towards meeting its safety performance targets when at least four of the five safety performance targets established under 23 CFR 490.209(a) have been met or the actual outcome is better than the baseline performance. The baseline performance is the 5-year average ending with the year prior to the establishment of the target.

The Basis for Target and Additional Comments are provided by the State in their HSIP Annual Report and have not been edited by FHWA. Any questions about individual State reports should be directed to the respective State DOT. For additional information about each State's HSIP, the complete reports are available at https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/hsip/reports/.

More information and resources on Safety Performance Management are available at https://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/hsip/spm/.

All State data used to populate the State Highway Safety Reports for 2020 are available for download at https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/tpm/reporting/state/tpm_dashboard_data.zip.

  • Number of Fatalities

  • Number of Fatalities 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
    Annual 23 23 27 31 31 23 36
    5-Year Average 27.0 27.0 29.6
    Target (5-Year Average) 40.0 30.0 29.0
  • Basis for Number of Fatalities Target

    The District of Columbia Strategic Highway Safety Plan (SHSP) Update 2014 (revised 2017) seeks to reduce traffic fatalities by 20 percent from 26 (average of 5 years 2008 to 2012, FARS data) to 21 by 2025. Between 2005 and 2017 the District fatality trend followed the national trend, downward from 48 in 2005 to 15 (lowest) in 2012. The five-year rolling average has been close to the SHSP target for years 2014 through 2016 after a series of relatively low actual fatality numbers in 2012, 2013, and 2014. Over the latest 5 years (2014 to 2018) the District has averaged 28 (27.4) traffic fatalities, with the actual traffic fatalities under the 5-year average for three (2014, 2015, and 2016) of the five years, but is higher than the 5-year average for the two most recent years (2017 and 2018). While annual traffic fatalities have been increasing in the last five years, it is important to note that the rate of increase has slowed over this time. The rate of increase for last three years, 2016, 2017, and 2018, is 17, 14, and 6 percent, respectively. The annual fatality trend and the 5-year rolling average trend projects 45 (44.6) and 36 (35.1) traffic related fatalities respectively in 2020. The District believes that, with the heightened focus on reducing fatalities and serious injuries, the average of both projections is attainable. Projected 2020 estimate = 40 (39.9) traffic-related fatalities.
    Traffic fatalities have been on an upward trend since 2012 (15) to 2018 (31). However, preliminary data indicate that 2019 traffic fatalities are lower at 27 persons. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.99), the District has the 2021 goal to maintain the 5-year rolling average (2017–2021) of 30 by December 31, 2021, which is approximately 10 percent less than the fatality annual trend.
    Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.99), the District has the 2022 goal to maintain the number of fatalities at 29 by December 31, 2022, approximately decrease by 7 (19 percent) from the 2020 total **Please note that the HSP Performance Target prepopulated here does not reflect the 2022 target.

  • Data Sources:
    Fatalities: 2014-2019 Final FARS, 2020 FARS Annual Report File
    Targets: 2019-2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Reports

  • Fatality Rate (per 100 million VMT)

  • Fatality Rate
    (per 100 million VMT)
    2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
    Annual 0.65 0.65 0.75 0.83 0.84 0.61 1.19
    5-Year Average 0.744 0.736 0.844
    Target (5-Year Average) 1.070 0.810 1.070
  • Basis for Fatality Rate Target

    The Fatality Rate is defined as the number of traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT). Preliminary numbers indicate an increase in VMT from 3,621,959,278 in 2016 to 3,711,065,230 in 2017, a 2.5 percent increase. With the increases in population, worker trips, tourist visitations, VMT, non-motorized trips, and other trip making activities in the District, exposure is expected to increase by at least 10 to 15 percent per year. However, with the ongoing and planned road safety activities in engineering, enforcement, education and emergency services, the District believes that using an average of both the high and low projections of 1.07 persons is achievable in 2020.
    With the increase in fatalities, population, worker trips, tourist visits, VMT, nonmotorized trips, and other trip-making activities in the District, exposure is expected to increase. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.99), the District 2021 goal would be to maintain the 5-year rolling average (2017–2021) of 0.81 by December 31, 2021 (a reduction of approximately 10 percent from the fatality rate trend).
    With the increase in fatalities, population, worker trips, tourist visits, VMT, nonmotorized trips, and other trip-making activities in the District, exposure is expected to increase. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.99), the District 2022 goal would be to maintain the fatality rate to 1.07. **Please note that the HSP Performance Target prepopulated here does not reflect the 2022 target.

  • Data Sources:
    Fatalities: 2014-2019 Final FARS, 2020 FARS Annual Report File
    VMT: 2014-2020 FHWA Highway Statistics Series, VM-2 Table
    Targets: 2019-2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Reports

  • Number of Serious Injuries

  • Number of Serious Injuries 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
    Annual 311 337 391 382 364 352 354
    5-Year Average 357.0 365.2 368.6
    Target (5-Year Average) 414.0 365.0 343.0
  • Basis for Number of Serious Injuries Target

    A Serious Injury is defined according to the latest edition of the Model Minimum Uniform Crash Criteria. Currently the trend of crash occurrences and resulting serious injuries is increasing due to the many issues. One issue in particular relates to the newly adopted crash reporting system that captures injury data based on the MMUCC 4th Edition. There is a high probability (based on experiences from other States) that serious injury numbers resulting from a crash will increase as officers are fully trained to identify suspected serious injuries at crash sites, leading to more accurate and consistent coding in the field. Serious injuries have gone from a low of 311 to a high of 388 over the last 5 years. The projections of both annual and 5-year rolling average trend significantly upward to 434 and 393, respectively, in 2020. The District believes that, with the heightened focus on reducing fatalities and serious injuries, the average of both projections is attainable. Projected estimate 2020 = 414 (average of both trends)
    Serious injuries have decreased slightly since 2016, from at a high of 391. However, all trends indicate a slight increase in future years. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.97), the District 2021 goal would be to reduce the number of traffic-related serious injuries by 2 percent from the 5-year rolling average (2017–2021) of 372 to 365 by December 31, 2021.
    Serious injuries have consistently decreased since 2016. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.97), the District 2022 goal would be to reduce the number of traffic-related serious injuries to 343, approximate decrease by 11 (3 percent) from the 2020 total. **Please note that the HSP Performance Target prepopulated here does not reflect the 2022 target.

  • Data Sources:
    Serious Injuries: 2021 District Of Columbia HSIP Annual Report
    Targets: 2019-2021 District Of Columbia HSIP Annual Reports

  • Rate of Serious Injuries (per 100 million VMT)

  • Rate of Serious Injuries
    (per 100 million VMT)
    2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
    Annual 8.82 9.47 10.80 10.28 9.86 9.37 11.68
    5-Year Average 9.846 9.956 10.398
    Target (5-Year Average) 10.470 9.860 9.110
  • Basis for Serious Injury Rate Target

    The District of Columbia SHSP seeks to reduce the serious injuries by 20% between 2013 and 2025. Serious injury rate is the number of serious injuries per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (VMT). The trend of crash occurrences and resulting serious injuries is increasing due to the many issues. One issue in particular relates to the newly adopted crash reporting system that captures injury data based on the MMUCC 4th Edition. Prior to 2016, the Metropolitan Police Department (MPD) database defined injury data as “disabling and non-disabling.” In 2016, the MPD changed the injury severity level coding in its crash form to correspond with the MMUCC, as per Federal regulation under MAP-21[1]. . There is a high probability (based on experiences from other States) that serious injury numbers resulting from a crash will increase as officers are fully trained to identify suspected serious injuries at crash sites, leading to more accurate and consistent coding in the field. Preliminary numbers indicate an increase in VMT from 3,621,959,278 in 2016 to 3,711,065,230 in 2017, a 2.5 percent increase. In addition, the increases in population, worker trips, tourist visitations, VMT, non-motorized trips, and other trip making activities in the District, exposure is expected to increase by at least 10 to 15 percent per year. However, with the ongoing and planned road safety activities in engineering, enforcement, education and emergency services, the District believes that a rate of 10.47 serious injury rate is achievable in 2020.
    The Serious Injury Rate performance target follows anticipated trends in the number of serious injuries. Serious injuries have decreased slightly since 2016, from at a high of 391. However, all trends indicate a slight increase in future years. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.97), the District 2021 goal would be to reduce the number of traffic-related serious injuries by 2 percent from the 5-year rolling average (2017–2021) of 372 to 365 by December 31, 2021.
    The Serious Injury Rate performance target follows anticipated trends in the number of serious injuries. Serious injuries have decreased slightly since 2019. However, all trends indicate a slight increase in future years. Using the 5-year rolling average and a power model (R2 = 0.97), the District 2022 goal will be to reduce the serious injury rate to 9.11.

  • Data Sources:
    Serious Injuries: 2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Report
    VMT: 2014-2020 FHWA Highway Statistics Series, VM-2 Table
    Targets: 2019-2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Reports

  • Number of Non-Motorized Fatalities and Serious Injuries

  • Number of Non-Motorized Fatalities
    and Serious Injuries
    2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022
    Annual 151 133 150 159 161 154 115
    5-Year Average 150.8 151.4 147.8
    Target (5-Year Average) 181.0 165.0 133.0
  • Basis for Number of Non-Motorized Fatalities and Serious Injuries Target

    Pedestrians and bicyclists are among the District’s most vulnerable roadway users and when involved in a crash with a motor vehicle, they suffer more serious injuries than vehicle occupants. Improving pedestrian and bicycle safety is major challenge as they compete with other modes of transportation for limited space. The number of bike and pedestrian trips, e.g., Bikeshare trips, has increased by 6 percent from 3.3 M trips in 2016 to 3.5 M trips in 2018. Additionally, preliminary numbers indicate a 2.5 percent increase in Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) from 3,621,959,278 in 2016 to 3,711,065,230 in 2017.There is increased likelihood of exposure and conflicts as the District meets it transportation demand goals. The District is committed to improving the safety of these modes as reflected in the State Highway Safety Plan (SHSP). The challenge is to accelerate implementation of the pedestrian safety strategies to reverse this trend and reduce the impact of crashes on these vulnerable users. Efforts such as the systemic treatments to reduce left turning speeds at intersections with relatively high potential for pedestrian conflict will help to reduce non-motorized fatalities and serious injuries. The District believes that a total of 181 fatalities and serious injury (23 non-motorized fatalities and 158 non-motorized) projections are achievable in 2020.
    In the District of Columbia, Nonmotorists account for a majority of traffic fatalities and a significant proportion of serious injures. Anticipated trends in the Number of Non-Motorized Fatalities and Serious Injuries reflect increasing pedestrian and bicycle activity, which increase exposure to crashes, as well as efforts by the District to implement strategies to reduce the numbers of fatal and serious injuries.
    In the District of Columbia, Nonmotorists account for a majority of traffic fatalities and a significant proportion of serious injures. Anticipated trends in the Number of Non-Motorized Fatalities and Serious Injuries reflect increasing pedestrian and bicycle activity, which increase exposure to crashes, as well as efforts by the District to implement strategies to reduce the number of fatal and serious injuries. The District's goal for 2022 is to keep the number of non-motorized fatalities and serious injuries to 133 by December 31st, 2022

  • Data Sources:
    Fatalities: 2014-2019 Final FARS, 2020 FARS Annual Report File
    Serious Injuries: 2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Report
    Targets: 2019-2021 District of Columbia HSIP Annual Reports


Additional Comments

N/A

Safety Performance Target Assessment

PLEASE NOTE: Each State’s safety performance target assessment is based on its own State-specific target methodology and program philosophy. Therefore, conclusions should not be drawn based only on the information in the Safety Performance Target Assessment Summary table. For example, the State may have set aggressive targets, and not met those targets, while another State may have set more easily attainable targets, and met those targets. FHWA understands that each State’s safety program is unique and therefore does not prescribe a methodology for States to set targets. States have the flexibility to use the methodology they deem most appropriate when setting their safety performance targets.

District of Columbia 2020 Safety Performance Target Assessment
Performance Measure 2016-2020 Target 2016-2020 Actual 2014-2018 Baseline Met Target? Better Than Baseline? Met or Made Significant Progress?
Number of Fatalities 40.0 29.6 27.0 YES N/A YES
Rate of Fatalities 1.070 0.844 0.744 YES N/A
Number of Serious Injuries 414.0 368.6 357.0 YES N/A
Rate of Serious Injuries 10.470 10.398 9.846 YES N/A
Number of non-motorized fatalities and non-motorized serious injuries 181.0 147.8 150.8 YES N/A

Updated: 04/19/2022
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000