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Transportation Asset Management Case Studies
HERS-ST: The Oregon Experience

Agency Facts

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The Oregon Department of Transportation (ODOT) is headquartered in Salem, Oregon. First created as the State Highway Department by the Oregon legislature in 1913, ODOT was re-established by legislative action in 1969 to incorporate other State modal agencies, such as motor vehicles, ports, aeronautics, and mass transit. ODOT has 5 regional offices, 14 districts, and 83 maintenance facilities. ODOT maintains 7,500 State highway miles and more than 5,000 bridges. The agency employs approximately 4,700 persons statewide.

ODOT's mission is to provide a safe, efficient transportation system that supports economic opportunity and livable communities for all Oregonians. The department manages the State's highway and bridge systems, administers motor vehicle and motor carrier laws, and oversees public transit, rail, and traffic safety programs throughout Oregon. The State's economy depends heavily on well-maintained transportation systems. Oregon's two main interstates, I-5 and I-84, are vital to commerce throughout the State. Recent studies indicate that the Portland and Upper Willamette Valley areas, located in the northwest part of the State, account for 75 percent of the State's economic production-and much of this productivity depends on the interstate system. Transportation systems are also essential in rural areas, where the remaining 25 percent of the State's production occurs, production that includes the movement of timber, agriculture, and other products.

For the 2002 fiscal year, ODOT reported that it had spent more than $251 million on 896 highway and bridge construction projects and nearly $27 million on capital equipment used to maintain highways and bridges. The department had committed $321 million for future highway and bridge construction.

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Updated: 11/14/2012