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CPTP Status Report - Task 65 Engineering ETG Review Copy

Appendix B - CPTP Project Details

Back to Project Summary Table

Key project details on each CPTP project are given in this appendix. These projects are referred to as tasks. Tasks 1 to 19 were designated to be performed under the IPRF program, and some of these tasks were funded and work was performed until the cooperative agreement between IPRF and FHWA was mutually ended. Work on some of the projects was continued under the FHWA management of the CPTP. As such, some of the projects include program details for both the IPRF and the FHWA managed activities, as appropriate.

(This is a working version of appendix b. It shows information under available reports/articles/presentations section that is provided for the engineering ETG use only as some of the information is not available for public distribution. Also, the format of some of the information will be changed for the final public version of this document.)

Task 1 (99) - Traffic Management Optimization Pilot Studies for Reconstructing Urban Freeways

Project Goals/Objectives: Demonstrate construction processes and traffic management strategies aimed at minimizing traffic and user disruption.

Background: Often the temporary disruption caused by reconstruction of pavements results in costs to the highway user and the local community that dwarf the capital cost of renewal. Concrete pavement contractors suggest that there are variety of innovative construction methods and traffic management methods possible to reconstruct sections of urban freeway with long-life pavement. Unfortunately, there is general skepticism amongst some engineers that long-life pavement reconstruction can be accomplished at minimal user disruption. Success in providing a quality long-life pavement with minimal user disruption would significantly improve safety and substantially reduce user costs because these routes will be open to serve traffic. Worker safety may also be improved by reducing workers' exposure to traffic during construction.

1st Contract

Contracting Dates/IPRF Contract: October 1, 1999 to May 30, 2000
Contract Amount/IPRF Contract: $55,189
Contractor: University of California, Berkeley, California
Principal Investigator: Jeff Roesler
IPRF Contract Manager: Mike Ayers

Status: One project was completed (I-10 in Pomona, California), including a research report by University of California, Berkeley. Electronic copies of the reports are available.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Concrete Pavement Technology Findings - Caltrans Demonstrates Weekend Replacement of Urban Interstate, Innovative Pavement Research Foundation and the Federal Highway Administration, 2001

Concrete Pavement Technology - Weekend Reconstruction - Urban Concrete Pavement on Interstate 10, Innovative Pavement Research Foundation and the Federal Highway Administration - Special Report No. 1, 2001.

Research Reports and Findings - Case Study of Urban Concrete Pavement Reconstruction and Traffic Management for the I-10 (Pomona, CA) Project, University of California, Berkeley, Institute of Transportation Studies, Report available through IPRF, 2001.
Lee, E.B., J. Roesler, J.T. Harvey, and C.W. Ibbs. 2002, Case Study of Urban Concrete Pavement Reconstruction on Interstate 10, Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, volume 128 no. 1, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, VA.

Other Related Reports/Articles/Presentations/Studies:

Roadway Research Notes - CA4PRS Software - Combining Pavement Engineering, Construction Productivity Analysis, and Traffic Simulation to Expedite Major Freeway Reconstruction Projects, November 2002, California Department of Transportation, Division of Research and Innovation and the University of California Pavement Research Center.

2nd Contract

Contracting Dates:
IPRF Contract: February 22, 2000 to June 2002
FHWA Contract: April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2005

Contract Amount:
IPRF Contract: $545,000 (actual billed amount was less than the contract amount)
FHWA Contract: $421,830

Contractor: Texas Transportation Institute
Principal Investigator: Stuart Anderson
IPRF Contract Manager: Mike Ayers
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Status: Under the IPRF contract, Texas Transportation Institute was developing a protocol of case studies of highways during rehabilitation/reconstruction. Five potential projects were identified (FL, LA, TX, 2 in MI). A project in Mississippi was being investigated for a conceptual study at the time of close-out of the IPRF contract.

The FHWA contract, incorporating a revised and updated statement of work, was awarded to Texas Transportation Institute with an effective start date of April 1, 2003. The Technical Advisory Panel has been organized and held its first meeting on September 1, 2003.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Task 3 (99) - Performance and Design of Whitetopping Overlays for Heavily Trafficked Pavements

Contracting Dates/IPRF Contract: January 21, 2000 to June 2002
Contract Amount/IPRF Contract: $359,900
Contractor: Transtec Group, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Robert Rasmussen
IPRF Contract Manager: Mike Ayers
Project Goals/Objectives: The research effort for Task 3(99) has four major objectives.

  1. To document, based in part on available data, the performance of the three classes of whitetopping overlays: ultra-thin (less than 4 inches), thin (4 to 8 inches), and conventional (greater than 8 inches).
  2. To develop a design procedure, for each class, that takes critical parameters and site conditions, into account.
  3. To develop best practice construction, and quality control guidelines ensure that quality whitetopping pavements are built.
  4. To identify potential rehabilitation alternatives, and solutions.

Background: Whitetopping has been used extensively throughout the United States. The design of these overlays has been based on conventional procedures, which assumes the existing asphalt pavement merely serves as a stabilized base course. In many instances, all three classes of whitetopping have exceeded their design expectations. Research is needed to determine an appropriate mechanistic design procedure. In addition to the design procedure, research is needed to identify the existing-pavement conditions that influence whitetopping performance for each class of overlay.

Status: The project was essentially completed under the IPRF management and funding. At the IPRF panel meeting in May 2002, the latest version of the design software and the construction and rehabilitation guidelines were presented and distributed on a CD. The contractor has invoiced IPRF for the full contract amount. IPRF has informed the FHWA that the final products would be completed and delivered to FHWA at a future date. No delivery date has been established as of December 2003.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Rasmussen, R.O., G.K. Chang, J.M. Ruiz, W.J. Wilde, P.K. Nelson, J. Dick, and D.K. Rozycki. 2002, New Software Promises to Put Whitetopping on the Map, Public Roads, Volume 66, No. 1, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

Task 4 (99) - Tests or Standards to Identify Compatible Combinations of Individually Acceptable Concrete Materials

Contracting Dates:
IPRF Contract: August 2000 to June 2002
FHWA Contract: March 2003 (restart) to April 2005

Contract Amount:
IPRF Contract: $550,000 (actual billed amount was less than the contract amount)
FHWA Contract: $390,000 plus $120,000 cost-sharing by the Portland Cement Association

Contractor: Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc.
Principal Investigator:
IPRF Contract: Shiraz Tayabji
FHWA Contract: Peter Taylor
IPRF Contract Manager: Colin Lobo
FHWA Contract Manager: Marcia Simon

Project Goals/Objectives: The objectives and expected results of this research are to develop practical test procedures and criteria to assess the effects of combinations of materials for concrete pavements on:

  • Early stiffening and excessive retardation that can affect workability, placeability, consolidation, and finishing
  • Potential for early-age cracking, including plastic shrinkage, and possibly the ability to attribute the cause of cracking to chemical, physical, and environmental phenomenon
  • Characteristics of the air void system, including non-uniformity, insufficient air, coalescence of air voids around aggregate, and excessive large air voids, all of which influence strength or durability or both

Background: Frequently, field experience has indicated that certain materials combinations may result in undesirable effects on concrete properties such as early stiffening (false set or flash set), inadequate or excessive retardation, excessive cohesiveness, problems with air entrainment, loss of workability, lower than expected strength, and unexpected cracking at early ages.

Reliable tests are needed to predict potential incompatibility of concrete materials that adversely influence the fresh and hardened properties of concrete at early ages. For example, combinations of incompatible materials may lead to early stiffening and unworkable concrete. ASTM C 359 was developed to evaluate early stiffening of portland cement and may not be applicable for evaluating combinations of cementitious materials and the interaction with chemical admixtures. A recent approach that may be more applicable to a combination of materials is the mini-slump cone test. No test exists to predict the potential for plastic cracking or early age hardened concrete cracking due to chemical, physical, or environmental phenomena. There is also no test to evaluate the potential for coalescence of air voids around aggregates, an unstable air void system under placement and consolidation, or a process that identifies an air void system in fresh concrete that will be detrimental to durability, strength, or both.

This research effort should produce tests and procedures to enable material suppliers, concrete producers, and users to identify undesirable material combinations that adversely affect the early-age properties of concrete, evaluate the uniformity of individual materials from the same source, and optimize the combinations for predictable early-age performance. Cracking and durability-related distress in the long term (later ages) is not included in the scope of this project.

Status: Under the IPRF contract, CTL engineers completed Phase 1 of the study, which included reviewing the pertinent literature, obtaining information from the field on problematic paving projects, and refining the laboratory test plan. This project was resumed in March 2003 under the FHWA contract. The contractor convened a technical working panel and submitted a work plan based on the last approved work plan from the original IPRF project. The work plan was reviewed at a panel meeting in June 2003. The contractor revised the work plan based on comments made at that meeting. Work plan approval and commencement of work are expected in September/October, 2003.

Phase 2, currently under way as part of the FHWA contract, includes developing and refining test procedures to identify potentially detrimental combinations of concrete-making materials.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Phase 1 Interim Report and Phase 2 Work Plan

Power Point presentation - Tests or Standards to Identify Compatible Combinations of Individually Acceptable Concrete Materials. By Peter Taylor, CTL, May 2003.

Public Roads - Getting It Together. By Shiraz D. Tayabji, July/August 2002.

Work Plan for FHWA Contract - Tests or Standards to Identify Compatible Combinations of Individually Acceptable Concrete Materials, prepared by CTL, June 2, 2003.

Task 5 (99) - Accelerated Loading Tests of Ultra-Thin Whitetopping (UTW)

Contracting Dates/IPRF Contract: 1999 to June 2002

Contract Amount/IPRF Contract: $200,000 for testing at FHWA's Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center and analysis of the data

  • $35,000 for technology transfer workshop; $48,000 for other technology transfer; $283,000 total allocation for task

Contractor: Transtec Group, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Robert Rasmussen
IPRF Contract Manager: Larry Cole

Project Goals/Objectives: Verify and/or calibrate existing UTW design procedures using testing data from the ultra-thin overlay projects at FHWA's Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center's Accelerated Loading Facility (ALF).

Background: Ultra-thin whitetopping overlays are relatively new composite pavement designs using 2- to 4-inch thick concrete overlays of asphalt pavements. The original ultra-thin overlay concept, developed in 1990, was for light traffic situations. In practice, some ultra-thin projects have been constructed on heavy-truck ramps, and even high-speed highways. Early performance of these pavements has been excellent, exceeding most expectations. Full-scale load tests were conducted from May 1998 to December 2000 at FHWA's Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center under a Cooperative Research Agreement between FHWA and the ACPA.

Status: The data from the ALF tests was analyzed as part of Task 3. A technology transfer workshop was conducted in October 1999. The IPRF Contractor made several site visits to the ALF to collect joint opening and bond data. The contractor included these results in the Task 3 interim report. The deliverables from this task are expected to include an Executive Summary, an ALF UTW database, and recommendations and concepts for technology transfer materials

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Rasmussen, R.O., W.J. Wilde, J.M. Ruiz, J. Sherwood, and J. Mack, 2001, An Analysis of Ride Quality of the Ultra-Thin Whitetopping Overlays at the FHWA Accelerated Loading Facility, Proceedings, Seventh International Conference on Concrete Pavements, International Society for Concrete Pavements, College Station, TX.

Rasmussen, R.O., B.F. McCullough, J.M. Ruiz, J. Mack, and J.A. Sherwood, 2002, Identification of Pavement Failure Mechanisms at FHWA Accelerated Loading Facility Ultrathin Whitetopping Project, Transportation Research Record 1816, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

Task 6 (99) - Incremental Costs and Performance Benefits of Various Features of Concrete Pavements

Contracting Dates:
IPRF Contract: August 2000 to June 2002
FHWA Contract: February 2003 to October 2003

Contract Amount:
IPRF Contract: $165,000 (actual billed amount was less than the contract amount)
FHWA Contract: $74,818

Contractor: Applied Pavement Technology, Inc.

Principal Investigator:
IPRF Contract: John Naughton
FHWA Contract: Kurt Smith
IPRF Contract Manager: Gerald Voigt
FHWA Contract Manager: Peter Kopac

Project Goals/Objectives: To determine the most cost-efficient combination of design features for concrete pavement, considering estimated costs and expected performance improvements of each feature.

Background: There are a variety of design features that can be incorporated into a concrete pavement design. A standard design using certain features is often propagated by a state agency for use system wide. In many cases these standard designs remain constant over many years. Eventually, there may become little institutional knowledge of the purpose and interrelationship of the design features included in the standard section, particularly in terms of the expected cost and performance. To apply the most cost-efficient combination of features and requirements, it is necessary to know how each impacts initial construction cost and pavement performance. While there have been several pavement feature related performance studies in the past, including those in LTPP, cost aspects have been largely ignored. Until the costs and benefits of design and requirement features are examined together, the issue of performance optimization will remain unclear. This project addresses this gap in knowledge.

Status: A draft final report was submitted in October 2003 to reflect comments raised at the meeting of the advisory panel in August 2003. The final report is now undergoing final FHWA editorial review, and the computer software for evaluating the impact of design features is being finalized. All products are expected to be delivered to the FHWA by mid-February 2004.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Research Reports & Findings - Concrete Pavement Research & Technology - An Annotated Bibliography - April 2001 by Applied Pavement Technology, Inc.

Power Point presentation - Incremental Costs and Performance Benefits of Various Features of Concrete Pavements. Presentation given by Kurt Smith, APTech, October 6-7, 2003 in Woods Hole, MA.

Naughton, J. E. and K. D. Smith. The Biggest Bang for Your Buck. Public Roads, Volume 66, No. 1.

Hoerner, T.E., K.D. Smith, and J.E. Bruinsma, October 2003, Incremental Costs and Performance Benefits of Various Features of Concrete Pavement Design Features, Draft Final Report, Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.

Task 7(99) - Field Trials of Concrete Pavement Product and Process Technology

Project Goals/Objectives: Conduct field trials of new products, processes, and technologies in actual construction projects.

Background: In many cases implementing new technology into the highway industry presents the following Catch 22: "A contractor cannot use technology unless it is specified, but a state cannot specify or allow a new technology until it is tried and proven." Task 7 seeks to encourage state agencies to partner with their local contractor and material/equipment supplier constituents to implement new technology for the betterment of the highway user.

Innovation areas for this program include technology that expects to: increase pavement service life, decrease construction time, lower life cycle and initial costs, lower maintenance costs, produce ultra-smooth ride quality, incorporate recycled or waste products while maintaining quality, utilize innovative construction equipment or procedures, and utilize innovative quality initiatives. Specific target areas include: load transfer optimization and materials; alternate concrete mixtures; surface finishing techniques; materials utilization; geometric and thickness alternatives and thin overlay construction. Through open solicitation, public and private agencies can seek funding to try new or improved concrete pavement technologies in field conditions. Reports, photos, video, and written reports will capture each effort for education and technology transfer.

Task 7(99) B - UTW Repair Techniques

Contracting Dates/IPRF Contract: March 27, 2000 to December 31, 2000
Contract Amount/IPRF Contract: $55,000
Contractor: Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Shiraz Tayabji
IPRF Contract Manager: Mike Ayers

Status: UTW Repair project is complete. The final report has been developed and is available in electronic copy. A video has been finalized; copies (VCR and compact disc) are now being produced. A four-page, four-color brochure describing the process for UTW repair is complete and has been widely distributed.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Repair of Ultra-Thin Whitetopping Roadways and Airfields Tech Brief - ACPA

Research Reports & Findings - UTW Pavement Repair Demonstration - CTL - 2001

UTW Pavement Repair Demonstration - Final Report by CTL, December 2000.

Wu, C.L., S. Tayabji, M. Sheehan, and J. Sherwood, 2001, Performance and Repair of UTW Pavements, Proceedings, Seventh International Conference on Concrete Pavements, held in Orlando, Florida, September 2001, International Society for Concrete Pavements.

Wu, C.L., S. Tayabji, and J. Sherwood, 2001, Repair of Ultrathin Whitetopping Pavements, Transportation Research Record 1778, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

Task 7(99) C - Weekend Intersection Reconstruction

Contracting Dates: June 2000 to June 2003
Contract Amount/IPRF Contract: $54,956
Contractor: University of Washington
Principal Investigator: Dr. Kamran Nemati
IPRF Contract Manager: Mike Ayers

Background: The frequent maintenance required on some asphalt concrete (AC) pavement sections has made reconstruction with Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP) a more feasible alternative. However many constructability issues need to be addressed in order to realize the full potential of this alternative. In Eastern Washington, three major AC intersections with severe rutting problems are due to be reconstructed with PCCP in August 2000. The entire reconstruction of each intersection, including demolition of the existing AC pavement and its replacement with PCCP, will take place over a period of three days.

Project Goals/Objectives: The goal of this proposed research program is to document this effort in order to provide practitioners additional options for rapid reconstruction of urban facilities.

Status: The reconstruction of an urban intersection on SR 395 in Kennewick was conducted in October 2000. A final report and a video documenting the intersection reconstruction have been prepared. The availability of these products is not known.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Fast Track Construction With Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP) At Urban Intersections. Proposal to IPRF. June 26, 2000.

Reconstruction Of Urban Intersections Using Portland Cement Concrete Pavement by Jeff S. Uhlmeyer and Linda M. Pierce. Presented at 7th International Conference on Concrete Pavement. September 2001.

In and Out in 72 Hours, (Kennewick, Washington intersection reconstruction) Reprinted from Focus, August 2001, FHWA-IF-03-21, Pavement Preservation Compendium, September 2003.

Nemati, K.M., Uhlmeyer, J.S., Pierce, L.M., and Powell, J.R., Accelerated Construction of Urban Intersections with Portland Cement Concrete Pavement (PCCP), Final Report, Federal Highway Administration, April 2003.

Video tape of intersection reconstruction process.

Task 7(99) D - Instrumentation of UTW in Colorado

Contracting Dates:
IPRF Contract: April 30, 2001 to June 2002
FHWA Contract: September 27, 2002 to December 31, 2003

Contract Amount:
IPRF Contract: $91,519 plus $25,000 cost-sharing by Colorado DOT (actual billed amount was less than the contract amount)
FHWA Contract: $24,386

Contractor: Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc.

Principal Investigator:
IPRF Contract: Chung Wu
FHWA Contract: Shiraz Tayabji
IPRF Contract Manager: Larry Cole
FHWA Contract Manager: Mark Swanlund

Status: Construction time instrumentation was installed during summer of 2001 and load testing was conducted soon after that. A second load testing was conducted during July 2003. Final report is expected in early 2004.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

IPRF RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Instrumentation and Field Testing of Thin Whitetopping Pavements in Colorado and Revision of the TWT Design Procedure - Proposal prepared by CTL, December 14, 2000.

Guidelines for the Thickness Design of Bonded Whitetopping Pavement in the State of Colorado, Report No. CDOT-DTD-R-98-10. Prepared by Scott M. Tarr, Matthew J. Sheehan and Paul A. Okamoto, December 1998.

Wu, C. and M. Sheehan, 2002, Instrumentation and Field Testing of Whitetopping Pavements in Colorado and Revision of the TWT Design Procedure, Report No. CDOT-DTD-R-2002-3, Construction Technology Laboratories, Inc., Columbia, MD.

Task 7(99) E - Precast Concrete Slabs for Full Depth Repairs

Contracting Dates: March 2003 to March 2006
Contract Amount/ FHWA Contract: $99,321
Contractor: Michigan State University
Principal Investigator: Neeraj Buch
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Project Goals/Objectives: Evaluation of the feasibility of precast slabs for joint repair or slab replacement through several demonstration projects. Overall productivity rates and potential cost and time savings will be documented, and a set of guidelines on the use of the technology will be developed.

Background: One of the limitations associated with conventional concrete repair materials is the time required for the material to cure and gain sufficient strength before being subjected to traffic. In concrete pavement rehabilitation, the use of precast slabs for joint repair or slab replacement is an alternative to conventional cast-in-place repairs. Precast slabs may be an effective means of reducing overall construction time, therefore minimizing user delay and travel costs while also obtaining a long-lasting, durable repair.

Status: The use of precast panels in field installations is currently underway in Michigan and Colorado. In the Michigan project, twenty precast concrete panels were installed on sections of Interstate 675 near Milwaukee, Michigan, and on Michigan Route 25 near Port Austin.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Buch, N., V. Barnhart, and R. Kowli, 2003, Precast Concrete Slabs as Full-Depth Repairs: Michigan Experience, Transportation Research Record 1823, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

Task 7(99) F - Implementation of TEMP System

Contracting Dates: March 2003 to February 2004
Contract Amount/ FHWA Contract: $85,141
Contractor: Transtec Group, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Robert Rasmussen
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Project Goals/Objectives: Demonstrate the Total Environmental Management for Paving (TEMP) software program and temperature management approach on several concrete paving or repair projects.

Background: Maturity methods are being employed by more and more agencies as a means of monitoring the condition of the in-place pavement and determining appropriate times to open the pavement to traffic. The TEMP system enhances current maturity monitoring technology by combining temperature, maturity, and strength predictions into a single measurement system that can be accessed remotely with a handheld or laptop computer.

Status: Field trials have been conducted on two paving projects in Iowa and one repair project on I-64 near Williamsburg, Virginia. A one-day workshop on the TEMP system was conducted on February 2, 2004 at the FHWA's Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Task 7(99) G - Magnetic Tomography for Dowel Bar Location

Contracting Dates: June 2003 to July 2004
Contract Amount: $125,530
Contractor: ERES Consultants
Principal Investigator: Tom Yu
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Project Goals/Objectives: The objectives of this project are 1) to provide laboratory and field evaluation of the MIT Scan-2 device to assess accuracy and repeatability of measurements of dowel position, 2) to compare the MIT Scan-2 measurements with measurements of other devices such as cover meter and ground penetrating radar (GPR), 3) to demonstrate MIT Scan-2 to contractors and State DOT personnel and collect their comments on usability of this device, and 4) to develop recommendations for use of MIT Scan-2 in QA/QC procedures by contractors and State DOTs and develop comprehensive training material.

Background: The misalignment of dowel bars at transverse joints can significantly detract from pavement performance. Although many agencies specify an allowable tolerance on dowel bar misalignments, rarely are the dowel bar locations checked after paving, largely because there is no economical or rapid way of assessing dowel bar misalignment. Recent research in Germany has developed a Magnetic Imaging Tomography (MIT) device with the specific purpose of rapidly locating steel dowel and tie bars in concrete pavements. In one measurement, the device scans the entire length of a joint and determines the location and alignment of all dowels, providing preliminary results immediately after the measurements. Because of its purported ease of use, accuracy, and measurement capabilities, there is a strong interest in determining the suitability of the device in U.S. concrete pavement construction.

Status: A comprehensive literature search was conducted to identify and evaluate the available devices for determining dowel bar alignment. Laboratory testing on the accuracy of the MIT Scan-2 device is underway. A small field trial of the device was conducted near Reno, NV, with more comprehensive trials planned for 2004. An interim report is expected in early 2004.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

PowerPoint Presentation: Bar Placement Locator-Magnetic Imaging Technology to Locate Dowel Bars Accurately. Given By Tom Yu at the 2003 ACPA Annual Meeting.

Task 7(99) H - Field Evaluation of Elliptical Steel Dowel Performance

Contracting Dates: May 2003 to March 2008
Contract Amount/FHWA Contract: $110,135
Contractor: Iowa State University
Principal Investigator: Jim Cable
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Project Goals/Objectives: The goal of this research is to incorporate elliptically shaped steel and fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) dowels and basket assemblies in an actual construction project and evaluate their performance over a 5-year period.

Background: Effective load transfer at transverse joints is critical to the performance of jointed concrete pavements. Current trends in load transfer design are toward the use of larger diameter dowel bars as a means of reducing critical dowel-concrete bearing stresses. An intriguing variation in dowel bar design is the use of elliptical-shaped dowel bars, which are expected to reduce critical dowel-concrete bearing stresses by distributing loading over a wider area. However, such designs are new and have not been tested in the field.

Status: Elliptical dowels have been incorporated into construction projects. A construction report on a project incorporating elliptical dowel bars has been prepared.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Cable, J., Edgar, L. and Williams, J., Field Evaluation of Elliptical Steel Dowel Performance, Construction Report, Iowa State University, July 2003.

PowerPoint Presentation: Elliptical Dowel Applications. By Jim Cable. Presented at 2003 TRB Annual Meeting.

Task 7(99) I - Evaluation of PRS in Tennessee

Contracting Dates: July 2003 to March 2004
Contract Amount/FHWA Contract: $127,412
Contractor: ERES Consultants
Principal Investigator: Nasir Gharaibeh
FHWA Contract Manager: Sam Tyson

Project Goals/Objectives: To begin the implementation of performance-related specifications (PRS) by having State highway agencies develop, put into use, and evaluate a PRS system tailored to their needs.

Background: Over the past 25 years, there has been a growing interest in the development of PRS for highway pavement construction. PRS systems are similar to quality assurance specifications; however the measured acceptance quality characteristics (e.g. concrete strength, slab thickness, initial smoothness) are directly related to pavement performance through mathematical relationships. Performance is defined by key distress types and is directly related to the future maintenance and rehabilitation costs and user costs of the highway. This link between acceptance quality characteristics and future life-cycle costs provides the ability to develop rational and fair contractor pay adjustments that depend on the as-constructed quality delivered for the project. Several FHWA research projects on development of PRS have now been completed, and guidance for implementing PRS is now available in the form of: (1) a prototype PRS; (2) a 19-step procedure for developing PRS; and (3) PaveSpec software.

Status: Work in progress. Tennessee has held several PRS planning meetings, and work on identifying a specific project is underway.

Available Reports/Articles/Presentations:

FHWA RFP Objectives, Scope of Work and Proposed Work Plan; Contractor's Work Plan

Other Related Reports/Articles/Presentations/Studies:

Gharaibeh, N.G., P.A. Kopac, and M.I. Darter, 2001, Effect of Variability and Central Tendency in Performance-Related Specifications for Concrete Pavements, Proceedings, Seventh International Conference on Concrete Pavements, International Society for Concrete Pavements, College Station, TX.

Gharaibeh, N.G., J. Stefanski, and M.I. Darter, 2002, Evaluation of Concrete Pavement Construction Scenarios Under Performance- Related Specifications, Transportation Research Record 1813, Transportation Research Board, Washington, DC.

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Updated: 04/07/2011
 

FHWA
United States Department of Transportation - Federal Highway Administration