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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-072
Date: July 2006

Assessing Stream Channel Stability At Bridges in Physiographic Regions

 

APPENDIX A

This section contains a photo album for bridge-stream intersections according to physiographic regions.

Figure 21. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Dry Creek in the Pacific Coastal region looking upstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated and the bed material is very rocky.

Figure 22. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are vegetated with shrubs, and some trees are on the right bank.

Figure 21. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from bridge.
Figure 22. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 23. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream under bridge, photo 1. Photo. This is looking upstream under the bridge at the rocky bed material and show good alignment with the bridge.

Figure 24. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream under bridge, photo 2. This is looking upstream. The photo shows a cascading bed and boulder-filled bed material.

Figure 23. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream under bridge, photo 1.

Figure 24. Dry Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream under bridge, photo 2.

Figure 25. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from under bridge. Photo. This is Dutch Bill Creek in the Pacific Coastal region looking upstream from under the bridge. The photo shows a large bar on the left bank that is covered with leaves.

Figure 26. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel thalweg is against the right abutment.

Figure 25. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from under bridge.

Figure 26. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream at bridge.

Figure 27. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from under bridge. Photo. This is looking further downstream from the bridge than the next figure, figure 27. The photo shows large boulder-filled bed material.

Figure 28. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream through bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream through the bridge. The thalweg is up against the right abutment.

Figure 27. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from under bridge.

Figure 28. Dutch Bill Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream through bridge.

Figure 29. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Buena Vista Creek in the Pacific Coastal region looking upstream from the bridge. The photo shows a lack of woody vegetation and dry channel bed.

Figure 30. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from bridge.Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. There is minimal vegetation and a high bank wall on the left bank.

Figure 29. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 30. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 31. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream under bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream under the bridge. The photo shows a sandy bed and sandy bank materials.

Figure 32. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from under bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream. This photo also shows the dry, sandy bed.

Figure 31. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream under bridge.

Figure 32. Buena Vista Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from under bridge.

Figure 33. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is Jacalitos Creek in the Pacific Coastal region looking downstream from the bridge. A dry, sandy bed is shown.

Figure 34. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The photo shows that the bank vegetation is large shrubs.

Figure 33. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 34. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 35. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The photo shows a large scour hole around the left pier.

Figure 36. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from under bridge. Photo. This is looking further downstream. The channel is not well-defined, as shown in the photo.

Figure 35. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 36. Jacalitos Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from under bridge.

Figure 37. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is Murietta Creek in the Pacific Coastal region looking downstream from the bridge. The bed material is sandy and the bank vegetation is small, woody shrubs and trees.

Figure 38. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The photo shows that the channel is wide relative to its depth.

Figure 37. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 38. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 39. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-upstream toward bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream toward the bridge and underneath it. There is a large scour hole around the pier.

Figure 40. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The photo shows scour around two piers.

Figure 39. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-
upstream toward bridge.

Figure 40. Murietta Creek, Pacific Coastal-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 41. Mojave River, Basin and Range-upstream from bridge, photo 1. Photo. This is the Mojave River in the Basin and Range region looking upstream from the bridge. The bed material is very fine sand, and the bank vegetation is nearly absent.

Figure 42. Mojave River, Basin and Range-upstream from bridge, photo 2. Photo. As in figure 41, this photo looks upstream from the bridge. It shows footprints that are made easily in the fine sand. The channel is very wide relative to the depth; however, some channelization is obvious, creating a narrower, deeper channel.

Figure 41. Mojave River, Basin and Range-
upstream from bridge, photo 1.

Figure 42. Mojave River, Basin and Range-
upstream from bridge, photo 2.

Figure 43. Mojave River, Basin and Range-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is completely dry and lacks definition.

Figure 44. Mojave River, Basin and Range-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge at a very poorly defined channel boundary.

Figure 43. Mojave River, Basin and Range-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 44. Mojave River, Basin and Range-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 45. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is a dry wash along Historic Route 66 in the Basin and Range region looking upstream from the bridge. The bed material is loose sand and gravel, and the bank vegetation is nearly absent. Some channelization is evident.

Figure 46. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-downstream from bridge. Photo. This photo looks downstream from the bridge and shows the poorly defined channel. The channel is very wide relative to the depth.

Figure 45. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 46. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 47. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is completely dry and lacks definition.

Figure 48. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This photo looks upstream at the bridge at a very poorly defined channel boundary.

Figure 47. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 48. Rt. 66 Wash, Basin and Range-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 49. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-upstream under bridge. Photo. This is the Sacramento Wash in the Basin and Range region looking upstream from under the bridge. The bed material is loose sand and gravel, and the bank vegetation is nearly absent.

Figure 50. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The photo shows channel mining. The channel is very wide relative to the depth.

Figure 49. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-
upstream under bridge.

Figure 50. Sacramento Wash, Basin and Range-
downstream from bridge.

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The hydraulics and hydrology research program at the TFHRC Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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