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Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-05-072
Date: July 2006

Assessing Stream Channel Stability At Bridges in Physiographic Regions

 

APPENDIX A, continued.

Figure 151. Morgan Creek, Atlantic Coastal Plain-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. Mass wasting is evident on the right bank, and the left bank is stabilized with riprap under the bridge.

Figure 152. Morgan Creek, Atlantic Coastal Plain-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The right bank is stabilized at the bridge.

Figure 151. Morgan Creek, Atlantic Coastal Plain-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 152. Morgan Creek, Atlantic Coastal Plain-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 153. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Hammond Branch in the Atlantic Coastal Plain region looking upstream from the bridge at a tight meander bend just upstream of the bridge. The banks are sparsely covered with trees.

Figure 154. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The right bank is sparsely covered with trees, while the left bank has few trees and grass. Riprap bank stabilization on the left bank has collapsed and fallen into the stream.

Figure 153. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 154. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-downstream from bridge.

Figure 155. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is rather wide compared to upstream, and the flow is calm.

Figure 156. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The collapsed bank stabilization material is seen in the channel bed.

Figure 155. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 156. Hammond Branch, Atlantic Coastal Plain-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 157. Pootatuck River, New England-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is Pootatuck River in the New England region looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees.

Figure 158. Pootatuck River, New England-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The bed material is large, and the flow is shallow and fast.

Figure 157. Pootatuck River, New England-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 158. Pootatuck River, New England-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 159. Pootatuck River, New England-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel is slightly shifted to the left as it passes under the bridge, and a bar is forming on the right side under the bridge.

Figure 160. Pootatuck River, New England-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The right bank toe is lined with rocks.

Figure 159. Pootatuck River, New England-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 160. Pootatuck River, New England-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 161. Mill River, New England-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Mill River in the New England region looking upstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees.

Figure 162. Mill River, New England-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are well-vegetated with trees and annuals.

Figure 161. Mill River, New England-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 162. Mill River, New England-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 163. Mill River, New England-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The channel is shifted toward the right abutment.

Figure 164. Mill River, New England-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel goes through a tight bend just upstream of the bridge, forcing the flow into the right abutment.

Figure 163. Mill River, New England-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 164. Mill River, New England-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 165. Aspetuck River, New England-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Aspetuck River in the New England region looking upstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees. The channel is straight, and flow is calm.

Figure 166. Aspetuck River, New England-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The bed material is larger, and the flow is shallow and faster than conditions upstream. The left bank is somewhat eroded just downstream of the bridge, but stable elsewhere.

Figure 165. Aspetuck River, New England-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 166. Aspetuck River, New England-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 167. Aspetuck River, New England-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The channel is well-aligned with the bridge, but it is as wide as the bridge. The right bank is stabilized with a stone wall.

Figure 168. Aspetuck River, New England-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The right bank stabilized with rock.

Figure 167. River, New England-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 168. Aspetuck River, New England-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 169. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is the West Branch of the Saugatuck River in the New England region looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees. The channel is straight.

Figure 170. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees. The channel is straight.

Figure 169. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-downstream from bridge.

Figure 170. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-upstream from bridge.

Figure 171. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-looking downstream at bridge (bridge in foreground is the pedestrian bridge). Photo. This is looking downstream toward the bridge. The bridge in the foreground is a pedestrian bridge that is just upstream of the auto bridge. The channel is aligned with the bridge, and the flow is rapid.

Figure 172. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the four-span bridge.

Figure 171. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-looking downstream at bridge (bridge in foreground
is the pedestrian bridge).

Figure 172. West Branch Saugatuck River, New England-looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 173. Mianus River, New England-upstream from bridge. Note weir. Photo. This is the Mianus River in the New England region looking upstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees. The channel is straight, and the flow is calm.

Figure 174. Mianus River, New England-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. The banks are heavily vegetated with trees. There is a weir in the channel about 22.9 meters downstream from the bridge that keeps the flow calm under the bridge.

Figure 173. Mianus River, New England-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 174. Mianus River, New England-
downstream from bridge. Note weir.

Figure 175. Mianus River, New England-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the arched stone bridge. Flow is aligned with the bridge, although the channel width is slightly larger than the bridge opening.

Figure 176. Mianus River, New England-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. The weir is seen downstream of the bridge. Flow below the weir is rapid.

Figure 175. Mianus River, New England-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 176. Mianus River, New England-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 177. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The cross section is trapezoidal, and the channel is well-aligned with the bridge.

Figure 178. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is McKnown Creek in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is only grass. Minor bed degradation and bank widening is evident.

Figure 177. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 178. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 179. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. There is only grass on the left bank with riprap for stabilization.

Figure 180. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge and riprap stabilization.

Figure 179. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 180. McKnown Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 181. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Wolf Run in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is only grass. Significant bed degradation and bank widening is evident.

Figure 182. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. There is only grass on the both banks, and bed degradation and bank widening are significant.

Figure 181. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 182. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 183. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge. Degradation and bank widening are evident.

Figure 184. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-upstream face of bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge.

Figure 183. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 184. Wolf Run, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream face of bridge.

Figure 185. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is unnamed creek N 48 in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is thick brush and trees.

Figure 186. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of thick brush and trees.

Figure 185. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge.

Figure 186. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge.

Figure 187. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel thalweg is hugging the right abutment.

Figure 188. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream through bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream through the bridge, again showing that lateral movement has caused the thalweg to press against the right abutment.

Figure 187. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 188. Unnamed creek (N 48), Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream through bridge.

Figure 189. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Reids Run in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is thick brush and trees.

Figure 190. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of thick brush and trees.

Figure 189. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 190. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 191. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel thalweg is hugging the left abutment.

Figure 192. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge, again showing that lateral movement has caused the thalweg to press against the left abutment.

Figure 191. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 192. Reids Run, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 193. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is Piney Creek in the Appalachian Plateau region looking downstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation consists of annuals for about 30.5 meters downstream, and then consists of thick brush and trees. In addition, the nearly 30.5 meters of channel is considerably wider where the channel was widened for the bridge.

Figure 194. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream from the bridge. Bank vegetation is grass on the right bank and thick brush and trees on the left bank. A large point bar is deposited on the right bank just upstream from the bridge.

Figure 193. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 194. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 195. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge and the large bar devoid of vegetation. The channel thalweg is hugging the left abutment.

Figure 196. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge, showing some misalignment of the channel in the bridge opening. The left bank is protected with riprap.

Figure 195. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 196. Piney Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

Figure 197. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-upstream from bridge. Photo. This is Sandy Creek in the Appalachian Plateau region looking upstream from the bridge. Banks are grass lined with some trees further upstream.

Figure 198. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-downstream from bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream from the bridge showing ragged bank lines due to overwidening of the channel.

Figure 197. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
upstream from bridge.

Figure 198. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
downstream from bridge.

Figure 199. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking downstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking downstream at the bridge. The channel thalweg is hugging the right abutment.

Figure 200. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-looking upstream at bridge. Photo. This is looking upstream at the bridge, again showing that lateral movement has caused the thalweg to press against the right abutment.

Figure 199. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking downstream at bridge.

Figure 200. Sandy Creek, Appalachian Plateau-
looking upstream at bridge.

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The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT).
The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) is a part of the U.S. Department of Transportation and is headquartered in Washington, D.C., with field offices across the United States. is a major agency of the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). The hydraulics and hydrology research program at the TFHRC Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA) R&T Web site portal, which provides access to or information about the Agency’s R&T program, projects, partnerships, publications, and results.
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