U.S. Department of Transportation
Federal Highway Administration
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE
Washington, DC 20590
202-366-4000


Skip to content
FacebookYouTubeTwitterFlickrLinkedIn

MAP-21 - Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century

Home / MAP-21 / Guidance / Implementation Guidance for the Federal Lands Transportation Program

Note: This document was superseded on 6/29/2016 by: Federal Lands Transportation Program (FLTP) Implementation Guidance

Implementation Guidance for the Federal Lands Transportation Program

Updated: 4/19/2013 - Questions and Answers have been moved to separate document.

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance for implementing and administering the Federal Lands Transportation Program (FLTP), established under the Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (MAP-21), Public Law 112-141.

Framework

The FLTP builds upon the structure of the traditional Federal Lands Highway Program. It improves multi-modal access within national parks, forests, wildlife refuges, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers facilities.

The FLTP complements the Federal Lands Access Program. Where the Access Program provides funds for State and local roads that access the Federal estate, the FLTP focuses on the transportation infrastructure owned and maintained by Federal lands management agencies.

The use of the FLTP funds does not affect the overall responsibility for construction, maintenance, and operations of the facilities. That responsibility continues to lie with the owner of the facility.

Eligibility

Section 1119 of MAP-21 establishes the FLTP to provide that funds made available for the FLTP shall be used by the Secretary of Transportation and the Secretaries of Federal land management agencies (FLMAs) to pay the costs of:

  1. program administration, transportation planning, research, preventive maintenance, engineering, rehabilitation, restoration, construction, and reconstruction of Federal Lands Transportation Facilities,1 and --
    1. adjacent vehicular parking areas;
    2. acquisition of necessary scenic easements and scenic or historic sites;
    3. provision for pedestrians and bicycles;
    4. environmental mitigation in or adjacent to Federal land open to the public --
      1. to improve public safety and reduce vehicle-caused wildlife mortality while maintaining habitat connectivity; and
      2. to mitigate the damage to wildlife, aquatic organism passage, habitat, and ecosystem connectivity, including the costs of constructing, maintaining, replacing, or removing culverts and bridges, as appropriate;
    5. construction and reconstruction of roadside rest areas, including sanitary and water facilities;
    6. congestion mitigation; and
    7. other appropriate public road facilities, as determined by the Secretary;
  2. operation and maintenance of transit facilities;
  3. any transportation project eligible for assistance under title 23 that is on a public road within or adjacent to, or that provides access to, Federal lands open to the public; and
  4. not more than $10,000,000 of the amounts made available per fiscal year to carry out 23 U.S.C. 203 for activities eligible under section 203(a)(1)(A)(iv).

In regard to (B) above, "operation and maintenance of transit facilities" includes the operation and maintenance of any components of a transit system, including vehicles.

The eligibility under (C) above includes transit capital projects eligible under Chapter 53 of title 49, United States Code, that are also eligible under title 23 and that are within or adjacent to, or that provides access to, Federal lands open to the public

In regard to (D) above, the mitigation activities referenced are limited to:

Mitigation for the connectivity impacts expressly made eligible in (A)(iv) is subject to the $10,000,000 cap in (D).  Mitigation activities other than those listed in (A)(iv) are not subject to that cap.  Subject to the provisions of 23 CFR 771.105(d), they remain eligible as incidental and necessary costs of construction.

MAP-21 amends 23 U.S.C. 120(k) to allow FLTP funds to be used as the non-Federal match required for any other title 23, United States Code, and Chapter 53, title 49, United States Code, projects that provide access to or within Federal or tribal land. This does not limit the ability of FLMAs to pursue and implement public/private partnerships when appropriate.

Performance Management

As described in MAP-21, the central theme of this new program structure is performance management.2 The U.S. Department of Transportation will be leading a multimodal rulemaking initiative to support the performance management provision found in MAP-21.3

The processes reflected in this guidance address how authorized funds support the national goals of the Secretary of Transportation and Secretaries of the FLMAs. These processes do not remove FLMAs from making the final programming decisionsThis role will continue to reside with the FLMAs.

All five FLMAs - National Park Service (NPS), Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), USDA Forest Service (FS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - must provide an application that proposes programs at various potential funding levels.4 Each FLMA should include a description of how the program will support the transportation goals of: (1) maintaining transportation facilities in a state of good repair, reducing bridge deficiencies, and improving safety; (2) providing access to high-use Federal recreation sites or high-use Federal economic generators; and (3) the resource and asset management goals of the Secretary of the respective FLMA.5 Additional guidance on the application can be found below in the section called "Investment Strategy."

Period of Availability

The funds made available under this program will be available for the current year plus three additional years.6 The Federal share is 100%.

Transportation Planning and Funding

23 U.S.C 134 and 135 and 49 U.S.C. 5304 and 5305 govern the metropolitan and statewide transportation planning and programming processes, based on "3-C" principles: comprehensive, continuous, and cooperative. Likewise, Section 1119 of MAP-21 builds upon past requirements for FLMAs to carry out transportation planning and programming development processes. Moreover, MAP-21 amends 23 U.S.C. 201(c) to ensure that "transportation planning procedures for Federal lands and tribal transportation facilities are consistent with the planning processes required under 23 U.S.C. 134 and 135." Therefore, the FLTP provides another opportunity for additional inter-governmental cooperation in transportation planning, programming, and decision-making.

Similar to the Federal Lands Highway Program, all title 23 and other regionally significant projects under the FLTP should be developed in cooperation with State and metropolitan planning organizations and included in appropriate Federal lands transportation program plans, State and metropolitan plans, and transportation improvement programs. The approved Federal lands transportation program will be included in appropriate State and metropolitan planning organization plans and programs.

23 U.S.C. 201(c)(7) directs the Secretary to set-aside up to five percent of funds each fiscal year from both the FLTP and Federal Lands Access Program (Access Program) funds for system-wide transportation planning and coordination, asset management, data collection, and establishment of data standards. These activities must be funded out of this set-aside, and cannot be funded with core FLTP or Access Program funding.

National Program Manager

Though not mandated by MAP-21, each FLMA should designate a National Program Manager to work with Federal Lands Highway (FLH) offices to organize the development of the FLMA investment strategy. The FHWA role in the development of partners' program proposal(s) will be focused on clarifying any questions associated with this guidance, providing program data if available, and offering other empirical information.

FHWA Statutory Responsibilities

Although the FLMAs have considerable responsibility and latitude for managing their program within the FLTP, the FHWA is ultimately responsible for ensuring the program is administered according to the statutory and implementing regulations for title 23, United States Code. This includes conformity to highway planning, design, construction, maintenance, and safety standards. Roles and responsibilities should be included in new and/or updated MOUs between the FHWA and each FLMA.

Agreements

Program Agreements

FHWA will work with current partners to update or revise program agreements to document the processes and responsibilities of each agency in meeting the requirements of title 23, United States Code, as amended by MAP-21. FHWA will work with new partners to develop new program agreements.

The purpose of these agreements will be to address authority, responsibilities, financial reporting requirements, program management, and stewardship and oversight. A template will be developed and distributed to partner agencies.

Project Agreements

FHWA will work with partners to execute a Project Agreement for each project between the pertinent agencies prior to initiating NEPA and other project development activities. Generally, the agency administering the project will initiate the agreement. The project agreement will generally include:

  1. Scope of the project;
  2. Schedule for delivery;
  3. Budget, including funding sources other than FLTP;
  4. Roles and responsibilities; and
  5. Other project issues worth noting, such as the performance goal(s) supported by the project.

Investment Strategies

As amended by MAP-21, 23 U.S.C. 203 requires an application from all five FLMAs - National Park Service (NPS), US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), USDA Forest Service (FS), Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - that proposes programs at various potential funding levels. The FHWA will use the applications to determine the funding levels for those FLMAs that do not receive a specific authorization of funds under section 1101(a)(3)(B) of MAP-21.7

A specific application format or structure is not provided in the legislation, so a format is suggested below. Applications will be referred to as "investment strategies" to more accurately describe its contents.

Investment Strategy Format

There are two sections within the investment strategy. Under SECTION 1, the FLMA should identify, describe, and assess the baseline condition of its transportation network. Under SECTION 2 the FLMA should discuss five funding program categories - Project Development, Construction of Highway Facilities, Implementation of Transit Projects, Program Administration, and Special Environmental Mitigation.

Please note that while this guidance provides details regarding Section 1, elements of Section 1 will be phased in as shown in the Program Timeline, and will be part of the FY14 investment strategy submittal.

SECTION 1 - System Definition and Baseline Data

System Definition - Under this section, the FLMA should define the part of its transportation system to be included in the FLTP. Although all FLMA-owned facilities may be a Federal responsibility, not all are expected to be included in the FLTP. It is essential to define a system that is reasonable and manageable under the FLTP, to optimize the use of limited funding.

First and foremost, per 23 U.S.C. 203(c), the FLMAs' comprehensive national inventory of public Federal lands transportation facilities should reflect the criteria articulated in such section. One way for an FLMA to do this would be to identify the locations that receive high visitation or are economic generators and then identify the transportation facilities that make those visits or economic generation possible. There are other methods, of course, and this suggestion is not intended to preclude such methods.

While the inventory will likely emphasize roads and bridges, it should include other facilities for consideration as part of a comprehensive inventory. The transit and trail facilities previously eligible under the Paul S. Sarbanes Transit in Parks program are also eligible under the FLTP.

The following attributes should be used to collect and report information on existing and new transportation system inventories.

Data Attributes

Proposed Timeframes

1. Name
2. Associated Government Unit(s)
3. Asset ID
4. Geographic Location
5. Size of Asset (lane miles, number and age of transit vehicles, etc.)
6. Functional Classification (See Appendix A)
7. Facility Use (road, bridge, intermodal facility, park and ride lot, etc.)
8. FLMA justification for asset inclusion in FLTP inventory (e.g., recreation site, economic generator, other validation)

All five eligible FLMAs should provide FHWA with their definition/description of "high use Federal recreation site" and "high use Federal economic generators" by January 1, 2013. Reconciling this important element will then help support the full inventory requirement below.

All five eligible FLMAs should provide FHWA with a full asset inventory that will comprise their system under FLTP by July 15, 2013.

An interagency team, composed of FHWA and FLMA representatives, will be convened in the first quarter FY13 to flesh-out details and establish common definitions of the asset inventory attributes and other data collection classifications as described below. This guidance is subject to update based on the results of the interagency team.

It is acknowledged that FLMAs have different classifications and processes in place for managing their infrastructure based on their respective missions. A table of different classification schema has been collected and compiled based on FHWA's outreach with partners in 2012 (See Appendix A). This table will facilitate a single classification that is aligned with Title 23 specifications.

It is further understood that definitions of "high use Federal recreation sites" and "high use Federal economic generators" will vary across eligible FLMAs. Therefore, it is incumbent upon the FLMAs to provide FHWA with their proposed definitions/descriptions early in the process, i.e., before the full inventory and network is defined and reported. These definitions/descriptions will predictably be updated as the program matures.

Although each FLMA should clearly define what these terms mean for them, traffic volumes and economic generation will not be the only criteria used to compare one FLMA's investment strategy to another. Instead, these criteria will generally be considered when looking at each specific FLMA's system and investment strategy.

Baseline Data

The success of any performance-based program hinges on complete and accurate baseline data. Per the data collection requirement in MAP-21,8 each FLMA must collect and report data necessary to implement the FLTP. A study commissioned by FHWA and conducted by the Volpe Center identified four types of common data collected by all five FLMAs: paved road condition, unpaved road condition, bridge condition, and safety. These will be the baseline data that collected at this time

Paved Road Condition

By January 1, 2013, each FLMA should provide a data collection plan to FHWA for collecting paved road condition data based on the International Roughness Index. By October 1, 2015, each FLMA should complete their road condition data collection for all facilities within their inventory and report baseline data to FHWA. A possible repository for such information may be the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS).

Unpaved Road Condition

By January 1, 2013, each FLMA should provide a data collection plan to FHWA for collecting unpaved road condition data based on the Pavement Surface Evaluation and Rating system. By October 1, 2015, each FLMA should complete their road condition data collection for all facilities within their inventory and report baseline data to FHWA. A possible repository for such information may be HPMS.

Safety

By April 1, 2013, each FLMA should provide a data collection plan to FHWA for collecting safety data based on automobile accidents. Prior to April 1, 2013, FHWA will provide information to FLMAs for using NHTSA's Fatality Analysis Reporting System as the repository for such information.

Bridge Condition

FLMAs should continue to collect and report structurally deficient bridge condition data on all public vehicular bridges in the FLTP inventory into the National Bridge Inventory (NBI). Note that inspection data on public bridges outside the FLTP inventory are still required in the NBI.

Additional Data and Future Rulemaking

Where applicable, each FLMA should also provide data collection plans for collecting and reporting environmental, congestion, and transit asset data.

The U.S. Department of Transportation will be leading a multimodal rulemaking initiative to support the performance management provision found in MAP-21,9 for which data collection is an important element. During this process, FHWA will continue outreach with applicable Federal partners to solicit comments regarding data collection for the FLTP. Partner feedback through the rulemaking period will help further shape the FLTP data collection requirement guidance. Specifically, the rulemaking may address definitions, establishment of targets, and reporting procedures.

SECTION 2 - Funding Program Categories

In this section, the FLMA should describe how much funding is required, how they will prioritize projects, what their goals are, and generally how they will deliver their programs. There are four program categories for funding: Project Development, Construction and Implementation, Program Administration, and Special Environmental Mitigation.

Within each category, the FLMA should indicate a dollar amount of program funds needed, including costs associated with assistance that will be provided by others.

  1. Project Development
    Under this category, the FLMAs should:
    • Describe their funding needs for project development including environmental review, scoping, project-level planning, design, and development of transportation projects;
    • Describe project selection criteria that:
      • Shows preference to projects that emphasize a state of good repair, safety, and access to high-use Federal recreational destination sites and/or high-use Federal economic generators within the federal estate;
      • Incorporates the use of data into an analytical decision-making process; and
      • Aligns with the FLMAs' long-range transportation planning process and supports their own agency goals;
    • Describe how the proposed program (as approved) will be coordinated with and incorporated into the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) for the respective State (e.g., who submits, when);
    • Describe how the program will be delivered (e.g., FLH Divisions, in-house resources, consultants, or others). Include information describing their professional capacity, knowledge, and experience with applying roadway specifications and standards such as AASHTO and MUTCD, QA/QC procedures, transportation estimates and bidding procedures, and other industry standards;
    • Provide the dollar amount to advance the program; and
    • Provide options for scaling the program up or down.
  2. Construction of Highway Facilities
    Under this category, FLMAs detail their needs for the construction or implementation of transportation projects. This category includes preventive maintenance and pavement preservation. The FLMA should:
    • Provide the dollar amount needed for construction and implementation, including construction engineering costs;
    • List expected outputs, such as number of miles improved, number of bridges improved, and number of safety countermeasures implemented;
    • Describe successful previous year delivery and performance: include obligation rate, measures taken and success documented to shorten project delivery, leveraging funds, innovative financing, and other innovative processes or technologies incorporated; use prior fiscal year data and update with current year data as appropriate; and
    • Provide options for scaling the program up or down.
    • The FLMA should NOT include in this section costs associated with special environmental mitigation activities described under 203(a)(1)(A)(iv). See category 4, below.
  3. Implementation of Transit Service
    Under this category, FLMAs detail their needs for the construction or implementation of public transportation projects. This category includes the construction of transit facilities, vehicle acquisition, and transit operations and maintenance. The FLMA should:
    • Provide the dollar amount needed for construction and implementation, including construction engineering costs;
    • List expected outputs, such as number of transit systems implemented;
    • Describe successful previous year delivery and performance: include obligation rate, measures taken and success documented to shorten project delivery, leveraging funds, innovative financing, and other innovative processes or technologies incorporated; use prior fiscal year data and update with current year data as appropriate; and
    • Provide options for scaling the program up or down.
  4. Program Administration
    Under this category, the FLMAs should include overall costs associated with establishing and managing a program:
    • Salaries of full time employees (Headquarters and Field);
    • Support (e.g., program management, training, outreach);
    • Travel; and
    • Other
  5. Special Environmental Mitigation
    Under this category, the FLMAs should detail their costs of environmental mitigation activities described under section 203(a)(1)(A)(iv). Include any activity that fits the description provided by section 203(a)(1)(A)(iv), regardless of whether the mitigation is discretionary or mandatory. A separate evaluation process will be used for these types of projects as detailed below.

Evaluation Process

Funding Program Categories 1 through 4

The FLMAs will have an opportunity to meet with FHWA staff and/or to participate in informational webinars before and after the evaluation period. In situations where an FLMA is developing a transit project, FHWA will also engage the Federal Transit Administration in these information exchanges. Applications will be evaluated based on the following:

Funding Program Category 4, Special Environmental Mitigation

The proposed environmental mitigation costs described by all five FLMAs will be totaled. If the sum exceeds $10 million, an interagency team will be convened to prioritize the list of projects to be funded for each fiscal year in the performance period. The team will consist of one member of each interested FLMA and the FHWA. Funds will then be allocated in the amounts agreed upon by the team in the manner described below.

Allocation

The FHWA will make every effort to announce approved programs at the beginning of each fiscal year. Prior to allocation of new-year funds, FLMAs and FLH Divisions will receive carryover funds to ensure that the administration of ongoing projects is not impacted.

Upon approval of the proposed program, FLH Headquarters will coordinate allocations with the FLMA National Program Coordinator and FLH Divisions. The FLMAs are encouraged to use a centralized request and approval process to facilitate efficient flow of funds.

Allocation of funds for Special Environmental Mitigation

Once each FLMA's share of the Special Environmental Mitigation category has been established by the interagency team, that amount will be transferred from each agency's share of the FLTP fund to a special environmental mitigation fund. Allocations, obligations, and expenditures for special environmental mitigation projects will be from a specific fund for tracking purposes. Funds not obligated at the end of each fiscal year will be carried over and made available for the new fiscal year's priorities.

Transfers or "Loan" Provisions

Upon agreement, the Secretary may loan funds authorized under FLTP and the Federal Lands Access program between recipients of funds within those programs or between the two programs19 , in order to accumulate funds for packaging larger projects. The loan would be of equal amounts of contract authority and obligation limitation.

An agreement should be developed and signed by the pertinent parties to document any loan arrangement. The terms of such agreement will, among other things, include a repayment term. 

The entity provided the loan (borrower) must pay back the funds to the loaning entity (lender) from unobligated balances of funds that have not lapsed that are available to the recipient for the program to which or within which the loan was made20, whether current year funds or carryover balances in accordance with the terms of the loan agreement. 

Reporting

Though not mandated by MAP-21, the FLMA should provide an accomplishment report. The first report should be provided to FHWA by February 1, 2014. It should report the goals and achievements for the previous fiscal year. Guidance on the format of the report will be provided by FHWA by April 1, 2013.


Federal Lands Transportation Program Expected Timeline

FY 2013

October 1, 2012 Effective date of MAP-21
FHWA issues call for FY 2013 Investment Strategies, SECTION 2 only
During solicitation period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs and/or conduct informational webinars to address questions
Interagency Baseline Data Team begins work
October 31, 2012 Investment Strategies, SECTION 2, due Before Evaluation Period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs to address questions
November 15, 2012 FHWA completes review and develops recommendations
December 15, 2012 FLTP Program Award Announcement
January 1, 2013 FLMAs description of SECTION 1 data collection plans for Roads and Bridges AND definitions due to FHWA
March 31, 2013 Due date for MOA's with FS, BLM, and USACE
April 1, 2013 FHWA issues guidance on Annual Accomplishment Report, due in Feb. FLMAs description of SECTION 1 data collection plans for Safety due to FHWA
May 1, 2013 FHWA issues call for FY 2014 Investment Strategies
May-July During solicitation period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs and/or conduct informational webinars to address questions
July 15, 2013 Deadline for FLMAs to submit Investment Strategy
July-August Before Evaluation Period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs
Aug 30, 2013

FHWA completes review and develops recommendations

Sept 30, 2013 FHWA announces awards

FY 2014

Dec 31, 2013 Due date for updating MOAs with NPS and FWS
Feb 1, 2014 FLMA provides FY 2013 Annual Accomplishment Report to FHWA
May 1, 2014 FHWA issues call for FY 2015 Investment Strategy, in anticipation of an extension of MAP-21, or a reauthorization that continues this program structure.
May-July During solicitation period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs and/or conduct informational webinars to address questions
July 15, 2014 Deadline for FLMAs to submit Investment Strategy
July-August Before Evaluation Period, FHWA staff meets with FLMAs
Aug 30, 2014 FHWA completes review and develops recommendations
Sept 30, 2014 FHWA announces awards
October 1, 2014 FHWA confirms presence of FLMA safety data in FARS

 

Appendix A - Functional Classifications

 

FHWA Functional Classification

FHWA Description

NPS

FWS

FS

BLM Maintenance Levels*

A

Interstate System and other principal arterials

Serve corridor movements having trip length and travel density characteristics indicative of substantial statewide or interstate travel.

Serve all, or virtually all, urban areas of 50,000 and over population and a large majority of those with population of 25,000 and over.

Provide an integrated network without stub connections except where unusual geographic or traffic flow conditions dictate otherwise (e.g., international boundary connections and connections to coastal cities).

In the more densely populated States, this system of highway may not include all heavily traveled routes which are multi-lane facilities. It is likely, however, that in the majority of States the principal arterial system will include all existing rural freeways.

7 - Urban Parkway

 

Public Lands Highway

 

Minor arterial roads

(1) Link cities and larger towns (and other traffic generators, such as major resort areas, that are capable of attracting travel over similarly long distances) and form an integrated network providing interstate and inter-county service. (2) Be spaced at such intervals, consistent with population density, so that all developed areas of the State are within a reasonable distance of an arterial highway. (3) Provide (because of the two characteristics defined immediately above) service to corridors with trip lengths and travel density greater than those predominantly served by rural collector or local systems. Minor arterials therefore constitute routes whose design should be expected to provide for relatively high overall travel speeds, with minimum interference to-through movement.

1 - Principal Park Road/Rural Parkway

1 - Principal Refuge Road

 

 

B

Major Collector Roads

(1) Provide service to any county seat not on an arterial route, to the larger towns not directly served by the higher systems, and to other traffic generators of equivalent intra-county importance, such as consolidated schools, shipping points, county parks, important mining and agricultural areas, etc. ; (2) link these places with nearby larger towns or cities, or with routes of higher classification; and (3) serve the more important intra-county travel corridors.

8 - City Streets

 

 

 

Minor Collector Roads

(1) Be spaced at intervals, consistent with population density, to collect traffic from local roads and bring all developed areas within a reasonable distance of a collector road; (2) provide service to the remaining smaller communities; and (3) link the locally important traffic generators with their rural hinterland.

2 - Connector Park Roads

2 - Connector Refuge Road

Arterial

5 - high use roads, year round use, annual maintenance (Collector Roads)

C

Local roads

 (1) Serve primarily to provide access to adjacent land; and (2) provide service to travel over relatively short distances as compared to collectors or other higher systems. 

3 - Special Purpose Park Roads

3 - Special purpose

 

 

D

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

4 - Primitive Park Roads

 

 

 

 

 

Collector

Local - Open

4 - (Not currently in use)

3 - maintained for low volume, seasonal use (Local Roads)

2 - (Not currently in use)

E

N/A

N/A

5 - Administrative Access Roads

4 -Administrative Access Road

 

 

F

N/A

N/A

6 - Restricted Roads

5 - Restricted Road

Local - Closed

1 - intermittent service roads - maintained to minimize damage to adjacent lands/resources (Resource Roads)

 

 

 

 

 

 

0 - No further maintenance

 


Footnotes:

  1. 23 U.S.C. 101(a)(7) ("The term Federal Lands Transportation Facility means a public highway, road, bridge, trail, or transit system that is located on, is adjacent to, or provides access to Federal lands for which title and maintenance responsibility is vested in the Federal Government, and that appears on the national Federal lands transportation facility inventory described in section 203(c).")
  2. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)
  3. 23 U.S.C. 150
  4. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(A)
  5. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)
  6. 23 U.S.C. 201(b)(2)
  7. Section 1101 of MAP-21 authorizes $300,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2013 and 2014 for the FLTP, of which $240,000,000 of the amount made available for each fiscal year shall be the amount for the National Park Service and $30,000,000 of the amount made available for each fiscal year shall be the amount for the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.
  8. 23 U.S.C. 201(c)(6)
  9. 23 U.S.C. 150
  10. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)(i)
  11. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)(ii)
  12. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)(iii)
  13. 23 U.S.C. 203(c)(2)
  14. 23 U.S.C. 201(c)(6)
  15. 23 U.S.C. 201(c)(1)
  16. 23 U.S.C. 203(b)(2)(B)(iii)
  17. 23 U.S.C. 201(c)(5)
  18. 23 U.S.C. 201(e)
  19. 23 U.S.C. 201(e)
  20. 23 U.S.C. 201(e)(2)
Page last modified on February 13, 2017
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000