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Transportation Performance Management

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Other FAQs

Key Implementation Dates

Q. What are the dates for the actions to implement transportation performance management?
A. All the key implementation dates for the TPM requirements are included in the implementation timeline.

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Performance Period

Q. What are the dates of the first four-year performance period?
A. The first performance period begins January 1, 2018, and ends on December 31, 2021 with the exception of the CMAQ emissions reduction measure. For that measure, the first performance period begins on October 1, 2017, and ends on September 30, 2021.

Q. When is this period's State DOT baseline performance period report due?
A. The baseline report for the first performance period is due October 1, 2018, for all measures under this final rule.

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Bridge

Q. To what bridges does the rule apply?
A. The final rule applies to all bridges carrying the NHS, including bridge on- and off-ramps connected to the NHS.

Q. What are the bridge condition performance measures?
A. The measures are:

  • Percentage of NHS bridges by deck area in Good condition
  • Percentage of NHS bridges by deck area in Poor condition

Q. How are Good and Poor conditions calculated?
A. The measure is the percent of deck area classified as good and poor, using National Bridge Inventory (NBI) condition ratings for Deck, Superstructure, Substructure, and Culvert. Condition is determined by the lowest rating of these items. If the lowest rating is greater than or equal to 7, the bridge is classified as good; if it is less than or equal to 4, the bridge is classified as poor. Deck area is computed using NBI Structure Length and Deck Width or Approach Roadway Width (for some culverts). (Bridges rated below 7 but above 4 will be classified as fair; there is no related performance measure.)

Q. How are border bridges counted?
A. The deck area of all border bridges counts toward both State DOTs' totals.

Q. When do State DOTs establish bridge targets?
A. Two- and four-year statewide targets for the first Performance Period must be established by May 20, 2018. The State DOTs will report these targets in the Baseline Performance Period Report to FHWA by October 1, 2018. The State DOTs have the option to adjust four-year targets in their Mid Performance Period Progress Report, due October 1, 2020.

Q. Can additional bridge targets be established?
A. Yes, State DOTs may establish additional targets for urbanized/non-urbanized areas. However, these optional (or additional) targets do not replace the statewide targets.

Q. How should State DOTs establish bridge targets?
A. State DOT targets should be determined from asset management analyses and procedures and reflect investment strategies that work toward achieving a state of good repair over the life cycle of assets at minimum practicable cost.

Q. When do State DOTs have to report bridge targets?
A. The first reporting of 2-year and 4-year targets is due to FHWA by October 1, 2018, when the Baseline Performance Period Report is due.

Q. When are the first MPO bridge targets due?
A. Within 180 days after the State DOT(s) target is established, MPOs can decide to support the relevant State DOT(s) 4-year target or establish their own, quantifiable targets.

Q. What happens if more than 10 percent of the total deck area of a State DOT's NHS bridges is classified as structurally deficient for three consecutive years?
A. The State DOT must obligate and set aside NHPP funds for eligible projects on the NHS.

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Pavement

Q. What are the pavement condition performance measures?
A. The measures are:

  • Percentage of Interstate pavements in Good condition
  • Percentage of Interstate pavements in Poor condition
  • Percentage of non-Interstate NHS pavements in Good condition
  • Percentage of non-Interstate NHS pavements in Poor condition

Q. When are State DOTs required to begin collecting pavement data that meets the new data collection requirements (a full-extent IRI, Rutting, Cracking %, Faulting, and Inventory data conforming to the updated HPMS Field Manual)?
A. The dates are:

  • January 1, 2018: State DOTs are required to collect data for Interstate pavements.
  • January 1, 2020: State DOTs are required to collect data for the non-Interstate NHS pavements.

Q. What are the dates for submitting data that meets the new pavement conditions data collection requirements?
A. The dates are:

  • April 15, 2019, and each April 15 thereafter: State DOTs submit the first Interstate data that conform to the final rule.
  • June 15, 2021, and each June 15 thereafter: State DOTs submit the non-Interstate NHS pavement data that conform to the final rule.

Q. For how much of the NHS must a State DOT establish targets?
A. State DOTs must establish targets, regardless of ownership, for the full extent of the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS.

Q. When must State DOTs establish pavement targets?
A. Targets must be established by May 20, 2018. The State DOTs have the option to adjust 4-year targets in their Mid Performance Period Progress Report, due October 1, 2020.

Q. When must State DOTs report pavement targets?
A. The first reporting of targets (4-year statewide Interstate targets and 2- and 4-year statewide non-Interstate NHS targets) is due to FHWA by October 1, 2018, when the Baseline Performance Period Report is due.

Q. When are the initial MPO targets due?
A. Within 180 days after the State DOT(s) target is established, MPOs can decide to support the relevant State DOT(s) 4-year target or establish their own, quantifiable targets.

Q. How will significant progress toward pavement condition targets be determined for the first Performance Period?
A. The FHWA will not make a determination of significant progress toward 2-year Interstate System targets with the Mid Performance Progress Report for the 1st Performance Period (due October 1, 2020). The actual 2-year condition will become the baseline condition for the first performance period. For non-Interstate NHS pavement IRI-based targets, FHWA will make a determination of significant progress at the midpoint and end of the first performance period.

Q. What happens if FHWA determines a State's Interstate pavement condition falls below the minimum level for any given year?
A. The State DOT must obligate a portion of the National Highway Performance Program (NHPP) and transfer a portion of its Surface Transportation Program (STP) funds to address Interstate pavement conditions. The required obligation and transfer are in legislation and repeated in the published rule.

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Travel Time Reliability

Q. How do the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS travel time reliability measures differ?
A. They differ in implementation approach for the first performance period. State DOTs will provide a Baseline Performance Period Report by October 1, 2018, that will include two-and four-year targets for the Interstate system, but only a four-year target for the non-Interstate NHS. The State DOTs have the option to adjust four-year targets in their Mid Performance Period Progress Report, due October 1, 2020. There is no requirement for State DOTs to report baseline condition/performance or two-year targets for the non-Interstate NHS before the Mid Performance Period Progress Report. This will allow State DOTs to consider more complete data.

Q. How is NHS travel time reliability defined?
A. For purposes of the measures, Level of Travel Time Reliability (LOTTR) is defined as the ratio of the 80th percentile travel time of a reporting segment to a "normal" travel time (50th percentile), using data from FHWA's free National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRDS) or equivalent. Data are collected in 15-minute segments during all time periods other than 8 p.m.-6 a.m. local time. The measures are the percent of person-miles traveled on the relevant NHS areas that are reliable.

Q. What are person-miles for purposes of NHS travel time reliability?
A. Person-miles take into account the users of the NHS. Data to reflect the users can include bus, auto, and truck occupancy levels. The final rule changes the weighting of the Travel Time Reliability measures from system miles to person-miles; this change provides opportunities to capture overall occupancy factors from national surveys. The FHWA believes the person-miles concept is an appropriate way to measure reliability for investment decision making as it is more sensitive to congestion than system miles.

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Freight Movement

Q. How will freight movement be assessed?
A. Freight movement will be assessed by a Truck Travel Time Reliability (TTTR) Index. Reporting is divided into five periods: morning peak (6-10 a.m.), midday (10 a.m.-4 p.m.) and afternoon peak (4-8 p.m.) Mondays through Fridays; weekends (6 a.m.-8 p.m.); and overnights for all days (8 p.m.-6 a.m.). The TTTR ratio will be generated by dividing the 95th percentile time by the normal time (50th percentile) for each segment. Then, the TTTR Index will be generated by multiplying each segment's largest ratio of the five periods by its length, then dividing the sum of all length-weighted segments by the total length of Interstate. [23 CFR 490.511 and 490.513]

Q. Why is there a separate measure on freight movement on the Interstate?
A. The measure is a requirement of MAP-21 [23 USC 150(c)(6)] and considers factors that are unique to this industry such as the use of the system during all hours of the day and the use of a planning time index used by the freight industry in planning for on-time arrivals.

Q. Where will the data for the freight movement measure come from?
A. State DOTs and MPOs will have the data they need in FHWA's National Performance Management Research Data Set (NPMRDS), as the data set includes travel times for the full Interstate System. State DOTs and MPOs may use an equivalent data set if they prefer. [23 CFR 490.609]

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CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions: Total Emission Reductions

Q. Which State DOTs Are Required to Establish Targets and Report Performance for the CMAQ Emissions Measure?  New
A. Refer to Table 1 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. What Are the Applicable MPOs for the On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measure and the CMAQ Performance Plan?  New
A. Refer to Table 3 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. Where does the on-road mobile source emissions measure apply?
A. The measure applies to areas designated as nonattainment or maintenance for ozone, carbon monoxide or particulate matter. Applicable State DOTs and MPOs will establish separate targets for each of these criteria pollutants and applicable precursors. [23 CFR 490.803]

Q. Must all State DOTs establish targets for the on-road mobile source emissions measure?
A. No, only those whose geographic boundaries include any part of a nonattainment or maintenance area for ozone, carbon monoxide, or particulate matter. [23 CFR 490.803]

Q. Why is the on-road mobile source emissions measure limited to nonattainment and maintenance areas?
A. The CMAQ program's purpose is to fund transportation projects or programs that contribute to the attainment or maintenance of National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) in those specific areas. [23 USC 149(b)]

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CMAQ Traffic Congestion: Annual Hours of Peak Hour Excessive Delay Per Capita

Q. Which State DOTs (with Applicable Urbanized Areas) Are Required to Establish Targets and Report Progress for the Traffic Congestion: Annual Hours of Peak Hour Excessive Delay Per Capita Measure?  New
A. Refer to Table 2 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. What Are the Applicable MPOs for the Traffic Congestion: Annual Hours of Peak Hour Excessive Delay Per Capita Measure?  New
A. Refer to Table 4 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. How will traffic congestion be measured?
A. Traffic congestion will be measured by the annual hours of peak hour excessive delay (PHED) per capita on the NHS. Excessive delay will be based on travel time at 20 miles per hour or 60 percent of the posted speed limit travel time, whichever is greater, during in 15-minute intervals per vehicle. [23 CFR 490.705 and 490.707]

Q. What are peak travel hours under the peak hour excessive delay per capita measure?
A. The morning period is 6-10 a.m. local time on weekdays. The afternoon period is 3-7 p.m. or 4-8 p.m. local time, providing flexibility to State DOTs and MPOs. [23 CFR 490.705]

Q. Where does the peak hour excessive delay per capita measure apply?
A. For the first performance period (January 1, 2018, to December 31, 2021), it applies to urbanized areas of more than 1 million people with NHS mileage in nonattainment or maintenance areas for ozone, carbon monoxide, or particulate matter. After the first performance period, the population criteria changes to more than 200,000 people. [23 CFR 490.703]

Q. What needs to be done regarding the peak hour excessive delay per capital measure if an affected urbanized area overlaps with more than one State DOT or MPO?
A. All parties must coordinate and report on a single, unified target. [23 CFR 490.105]

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CMAQ Traffic Congestion: Percent of Non-Single Occupancy Vehical (SOV) Travel

Q. Which State DOTs (with Applicable Urbanized Areas) Are Required to Establish Targets and Report Progress for the Traffic Congestion: Percent of Non-SOV Travel Measure?  New
A. Refer to Table 2 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. What Are the Applicable MPOs for the Traffic Congestion: Percent of Non-SOV Travel Measure?  New
A. Refer to Table 4 in the document, Applicability Determination: CMAQ Traffic Congestion and CMAQ On-Road Mobile Source Emissions Measures (23 CFR 490.707 and 490.807).

Q. How will the percentage of non-single occupancy vehicle travel be measured?
A. A minimum option for measurement will be use of the American Community Survey (ACS) Commuting (Journey to Work) data from the U.S. Census Bureau. State DOTs and MPOs also may use localized survey or measurements. Finally, State DOTs and MPOs may use volume counts for each mode to determine the percent non-SOV travel, and will be encouraged to report any data not available in national sources today (such as bike counts) to FHWA. [23 CFR 490.709]

Q. What modes are included in the non-single occupancy vehicle travel measure?
A. The measure includes all surface modes of transportation that are not SOV, and may include travel avoided by teleworking. [23 CFR 490.709]

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GHG Measure-Effective Date and Repeal Notice

Q. What is the greenhouse gas (GHG) measure?
A. The GHG measure is one of three measures to assess the performance of the National Highway System (NHS). It is defined as the percent change in tailpipe CO2 emissions on the NHS compared to the 2017 level. (23 CFR 490.507(b))

Q. When does the GHG measure become effective?
A. On September 28, 2017, FHWA published a notice in the Federal Register (82 FR 45179) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-09-28/pdf/2017-20804.pdf] making the GHG measure effective.

On October 5, 2017, FHWA published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register (82 FR 46427) [https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2017-10-05/pdf/2017-21442.pdf] proposing to repeal the GHG measure and seeking public comments on that proposal.

Q. What effect does the October 5, 2017, notice have on the GHG measure?
A. The October 5, 2017, NPRM proposes to repeal the GHG measure and seeks public comment on whether the measure should be repealed, retained, or revised. FHWA is seeking additional information that may not have been available during the development of the Performance Management Final Rule.

Please submit any comments to the online docket [https://www.regulations.gov/document?D=FHWA_FRDOC_0001-1505] by November 6, 2017. Late comments will be considered to the extent practicable.

FHWA plans to issue a Final Rule in Spring 2018 announcing its decision on whether to repeal, retain, or revise the measure.

Updated: 11/21/2017
Federal Highway Administration | 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE | Washington, DC 20590 | 202-366-4000