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Transportation Performance Management

 

State Highway Infrastructure Report - New Jersey

In the line graphs below, FHWA uses Data Collection Year instead of Data Reporting Year to represent snapshot condition/performance at the time the data was collected. More information

The information displayed is provided by the State Department of Transportation (DOT) in their 2018 Baseline Performance Report, 2019 Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) data submittal, and 2020 Mid Performance Period (MPP) Progress Report and has not been edited by FHWA. Any questions about individual State reports should be directed to the respective State DOT.

Please note: FHWA has posted data from State DOT reports to help bring context to their performance targets. This data may result in some discrepancies among published State DOT performance data due to data sources and reporting years used when establishing the performance targets.

Significant Progress Determination

Using data from the 2020 MPP Progress Report, FHWA has determined whether a State DOT has made significant progress toward achieving its individual targets for five National Highway Performance Program (NHPP) measures and one National Highway Freight Program (NHFP) measure, as described in 23 CFR 490.109.

Full Significant Progress Determination Table

  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      New Jersey % Interstate Lane Miles Good Condition


  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- 58.9 62.1 62.6 --
    Target -- -- -- -- 50.0

    Behind the data: For the first performance period only, baseline condition and 2-year targets are not required for the Pavements on the Interstate System measures.


  • Interstate Pavement in Good Condition

    The information from the 2016 HPMS supplemental report that was provided to NJDOT to approximate the baseline for this measure in order to develop targets by May of 2018 indicated that the baseline was 61.25%.NJDOT used its pavement management system and its own measures, metrics and budget information to predict performance on the State Highway System, where it has significant experience with performance management and forecasting. A correlation analysis was developed and applied to the State Highway System performance to try to-predict corresponding performance on the NHS using the Federal measures and metrics. The results of this correlation analysis showed a gradually declining trend on both the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS pavements at the current funding level. Although not available to NJDOT at the time the targets were set, the results of the 2017 HPMS data submission indicated that performance for this measure had dropped to 55% setting a significant declining trend. Since comprehensive quantitative data regarding current and future investment levels on the NHS by other owners is not readily available, a survey was sent to all owners requesting information on past and future expenditures on NHS routes as well as qualitative information regarding future funding and pavement performance. This information was used to help validate the results of the correlation analysis.Since NJDOT has no experience evaluating and managing the NHS as a whole, no experience with the Federal pavement measures and metrics, only an estimated baseline condition for the NHS, a declining performance history for the NHS by the newly established metrics, as well as no specific budgetary or treatment type, cost and trigger information for the other 83 owners of the NHS, the Department recommends adopting conservative but realistic targets for this initial performance period with the understanding the they can be modified at the mid-period review if appropriate.

    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2019, 2020, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      New Jersey % Interstate Lane Miles in Poor Condition


  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- 1.9 1.8 1.1 --
    Target -- -- -- -- 2.5
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period only, baseline condition and 2-year targets are not required for the Pavements on the Interstate System measures.


  • Interstate Pavement in Poor Condition

    The information from the 2016 HPMS supplemental report card that was provided to NJDOT to approximate the baseline for this measure in order to develop targets by May of 2018 indicated that the baseline was 1.01%. NJDOT then used its pavement management system and its own measures, metrics and budget information to predict performance on the State Highway System, where it has significant experience with performance management and forecasting. A correlation analysis was developed and applied to the State Highway System performance to try to-predict corresponding performance on the NHS using the Federal measures and metrics. The results of this correlation analysis showed a gradually declining trend on both the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS pavements at the current funding level. Although not available to NJDOT at the time the targets were set, the results of the 2017 HPMS data submission indicated that the percentage of lane miles in poor condition had increased to 1.4% corroborating a declining trend. Since comprehensive quantitative data regarding current and future investment levels on the NHS by other owners is not readily available, a survey was sent to all owners requesting information on past and future expenditures on NHS routes as well as qualitative information regarding future funding and pavement performance. This information was used to help validate the results of the correlation analysis. Since NJDOT has no experience evaluating and managing the NHS as a whole, no experience with the Federal pavement measures and metrics, only an estimated baseline condition for the NHS, a declining performance history for the NHS by the newly established metrics, as well as no specific budgetary or treatment type, cost and trigger information for the other 83 owners of the NHS, the Department recommends adopting conservative but realistic targets for this initial performance period with the understanding the they can be modified at the mid-period review if appropriate.

    N/A
    N/A
    N/A
  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2019, 2020, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      New Jersey % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Good Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- -- 33.0 34.9 --
    Target -- -- 25.0 -- 25.0
  • Behind the data: Because New Jersey State DOT has established targets based on full-distress plus IRI data, FHWA has calculated the value for Actual using full-distress plus IRI data for assessing target achievement.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    This target was set using Full Distress plus IRI data. The information from the 2016 HPMS supplemental report that was provided to NJDOT to approximate the baseline for this measure in order to develop targets as required by May of 2018 indicated that the baseline was 32.45%. NJDOT then used its pavement management system and its own measures, metrics and budget information to predict performance on the State Highway System, where it has significant experience with performance management and forecasting. A correlation analysis was developed and applied to the State Highway System performance to try to-predict corresponding performance on the NHS using the Federal measures and metrics. The results of this correlation analysis showed a gradually declining trend on both the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS pavements at the current funding level. Although not available to NJDOT at the time the targets were set, the results of the 2017 HPMS data submission indicated that performance for this measure had dropped to 30.4% corroborating a declining trend. Since comprehensive quantitative data regarding current and future investment levels on the NHS by other owners is not readily available, a survey was sent to all owners requesting information on past and future expenditures on NHS routes as well as qualitative information regarding future funding and pavement performance. This information was used to help validate the results of the correlation analysis.Since NJDOT has no experience evaluating and managing the NHS as a whole, no experience with the Federal pavement measures and metrics, only an estimated baseline condition for the NHS, a declining performance history for the NHS by the newly established metrics, as well as no specific budgetary or treatment type, cost and trigger information for the other 83 owners of the NHS, the Department recommends adopting conservative but realistic targets for this initial performance period with the understanding the they can be modified at the mid-period review if appropriate.

    NJ has exceeded the established 2 year target of 25% based on "Full Distress+IRI" with 33% of Non-Interstate NHS pavement in Good condition. This target was intentionally set to be conservative due to unfamiliarity with the new federal metrics and analysis algorithms, and the high level of uncertainty regarding future NHS performance by those metrics and analysis algorithms, as well as no data on past performance and trends. (See general comment in P1). Although the data collection requirements for these new metrics on the non-Interstate NHS didn't take effect until January 1, 2020, NJ began implementing the new requirements on its portion of the non-Interstate NHS network in January of 2018 when it was required for the Interstate sections. This represents approximately 60% of the non-Interstate NHS network. As such, our 2018 and 2019 HPMS data represents more a reliable indicator of our performance by the new NHPP metrics. The percent good measure for the non-Interstate network remained flat at 33%. It is notable that although NJDOT collects data on it's network annually, data was not collected in 2019 on the 40% of the non-interstate network which is owned by others. We will not get a full refresh for this system until the 2020 data collection cycle is complete. For these reasons, coupled with tremendous budgetary uncertainty due to COVID-19, NJ does not wish to revise their 4 year targets to less conservative ones at this time. We are optimistic that we will have significantly more reliable data, a better understanding of NHS performance trends, and enhanced forecasting abilities so that we will be able to refine our targets for the next performance period.

    N/A
    NJDOT has implemented a ride quality specification on Local Aid grant projects similar to the specification applied to NJDOT state projects. This should help to improve IRI values and increase the % Good pavement on NHS routes owned and maintained by counties and municipalities. We have seen a continous improvement in IRI on the state network as a result of our implementation of this performance specification on the state maintained network. NJDOT continues to implement its Life Cycle Management strategy that is outlined in the TAMP by striving to meet our annual goal of $100M in pavement preservation work as recommended by our Pavement Management system. We are continually expanding and refining our preservation treatments and working to provide information, guidance and technical specifications to other agencies to promote the use of pavement preservation on all road facilities. We are increasing our coordination and communication between the Divisions of Transporation Operations Systems and Security and Capital Program Management to increase program coordination, efficient delivery of pavement projects and the pavement program as a whole. We continue to explore high performance treatments, materials, and practices and refine our specifications to focus on performance wherever possible. We are continuing our training outreach for DOT staff in Design, Operations, Construction, and Project Management as well as for the contracting industry. We continue to provide vital performance information to Senior Leadership, the Commissioner, the Governor, Legislature and the Public to stress the importance of investments in pavement assets.

  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2020, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      New Jersey % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Good Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 41.9 43.9 44.4 46.7 --
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period, FHWA has calculated the values for Baseline and Actual using International Roughness Index (IRI) only (or Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) values for road sections where speed is less than 40 mph) for assessing condition change from the baseline.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Good Condition (IRI Only)

    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      New Jersey % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Poor Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance -- -- 10.7 7.2 --
    Target -- -- 2.5 -- 15.0
  • Behind the data: Because New Jersey State DOT has established targets based on full-distress plus IRI data, FHWA has calculated the value for Actual using full-distress plus IRI data for assessing target achievement.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (Full-distress + IRI)

    This target was set using Full Distress plus IRI data. The information from the 2017 HPMS supplemental report that was provided to NJDOT to approximate the baseline for this measure in order to develop targets as required by May of 2018 indicated that the baseline was 2.38%. NJDOT used its pavement management system and its own measures, metrics and budget information to predict performance on the State Highway System, where it has significant experience with performance management and forecasting. A correlation analysis was developed and applied to the State Highway System performance to try to-predict corresponding performance on the NHS using the Federal measures and metrics. The results of this correlation analysis showed a gradually declining trend on both the Interstate and non-Interstate NHS pavements at the current funding level. Although not available to NJDOT at the time the targets were set, the results of the 2017 HPMS data submission indicated that performance for this measure had improved to 1.2% indicating a modest improvement. Since comprehensive quantitative data regarding current and future investment levels on the NHS by other owners is not readily available, a survey was sent to all owners requesting information on past and future expenditures on NHS routes as well as qualitative information regarding future funding and pavement performance. This information was used to help validate the results of the correlation analysis.Since NJDOT has no experience evaluating and managing the NHS as a whole, no experience with the Federal pavement measures and metrics, only an estimated baseline condition for the NHS, limited performance history for the NHS by the newly established metrics, as well as no specific budgetary or treatment type, cost and trigger information for the other 83 owners of the NHS, the Department recommends adopting conservative but realistic targets for this initial performance period with the understanding the they can be modified at the mid-period review if appropriate.

    NJ significantly missed the established 2 year target of 2.5% based on "Full Distress+IRI" with 10.7% of Non-Interstate NHS pavement in Poor condition. When initially established, this target was set to be conservative due to unfamiliarity with the new federal metrics and analysis algorithms, and the high level of uncertainty regarding future NHS performance by those metrics and analysis algorithms, as well as no data on past performance and trends. We were uncertain of the reliability of the initial "baseline" of 2.38% which we assumed based on FHWA's supplemental analysis of our 2016 HPMS data set, approximated to meet the new data collection requirements that wouldn't take effect until January of 2020 for the Non-Interstate network. (See general comment in P1). The HPMS report card on the 2017 data set became available prior to submitting targets in the PMF in September of 2018. The 2017 data seemed to corroborate the approximated 2016 data indicating 1.18% Poor for the Non-Interstate system. This supported our belief that a 2 year target of 2.5% would be conservative and achievable despite our unfamiliarity with the metrics. Understanding that although NJDOT collects data on it's network annually, consistent with the law, data was not collected in 2017 on the 40% of the non-interstate network which is owned by others. In retrospect, using it as an independent corroboration of the 2016 data set was flawed. The HPMS report card results for the fully refreshed 2018 Non-Interstate NHS data showed a dramatic increase in the % Poor pavement rising to 10.7% which was unchanged in the 2019 data set. Although, data collection requirements for the new metrics on the non-Interstate NHS didn't take effect until January 1, 2020, NJDOT began implementing the new requirements on its portion of the non-Interstate NHS network in January of 2018 when it was required for the Interstate sections representing approximately 60% of the non-Interstate NHS network. These new requirements increased the wheel path width from 36" to 39" and included all cracking types in the wheel path cracking metric rather than only longitudinal cracking which together, significantlly increased the distress parameter of the % Poor calculation.

    Along with the Performance Management Rule, target setting and the revised pavement metrics were all new to States and there was significant confusion around their implementation. NJDOT misunderstood some of the nuances of the Non-Interstate NHS target setting exercise and the baseline data to be used for the initial performance period. This caused us to use unreliable baseline data on which to base our performance forecasts. It should be noted that the missed target is not in any way indicative of a sudden deterioration in pavement condition, poor life cycle management strategies or a large diversion from the planned investment levels in the pavement program. It is instead indicative that our assumed baseline with our initial target setting exercise was based on unreliable data. In order to correct this issue, we used the % Poor values from the HPMS report cards for the 2018 and 2019 HPMS data sets as a revised baseline and ran an updated performance forecast which predicts that 11.1% of the Non-Interstate NHS will be in Poor condition in 2022 which will represent the end of the first performance period and will be compared to the 4 year target value. However, understanding that we still have very limited experience with the new pavement metrics and no real performance trend information as data is only fully refreshed biennially for this system, coupled with tremendous budgetary uncertainty due to COVID-19, NJ would prefer to revise their 4 year target to a conservative value of 15% as we continue to gain experience through this first performance period. We are optimistic that we will have significantly more reliable data, a better understanding of NHS performance trends, and enhanced forecasting abilities so that we will be able to better refine our targets for the next performance period.

    NJDOT has implemented a ride quality specification on Local Aid grant projects similar to the specification applied to NJDOT state projects. This should help to improve IRI values and decrease the % Poor pavement on NHS routes owned and maintained by counties and municipalities. We have seen a continous improvement in IRI on the state network as a result of our implementation of this performance specification on the state maintained network. NJDOT continues to implement its Life Cycle Management strategy that is outlined in the TAMP by striving to meet our annual goal of $100M in pavement preservation work as recommended by our Pavement Management system. We are continually expanding and refining our preservation treatments and working to provide information, guidance and technical specifications to other agencies to promote the use of pavement preservation on all road facilities. We are increasing our coordination and communication between the Divisions of Transporation Operations Systems and Security and Capital Program Management to increase program coordination and efficient delivery of pavement projects and the pavement program as a whole. We continue to explore high performance treatments, materials, and practices and refine our specifications to focus on performance wherever possible. We are continuing our training outreach for DOT staff in Design, Operations, Construction, and Project Management as well as for the contracting industry. We continue to provide vital performance information to Senior Leadership, the Commissioner, the Governor, Legislature and the Public to stress the importance of investments in pavement assets.

  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2017, 2018, 2019, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only)

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      New Jersey % Non-Interstate NHS Lane Miles In Poor Condition


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only) 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 26.5 26.8 26.9 23.3 --
  • Behind the data: For the first performance period, FHWA has calculated the values for Baseline and Actual using International Roughness Index (IRI) only (or Present Serviceability Rating (PSR) values for road sections where speed is less than 40 mph) for assessing condition change from the baseline.


  • Non-Interstate National Highway System (NHS) Pavement in Poor Condition (IRI Only)

    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
    See Full-distress + IRI above.
  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 HPMS Data Submittal

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↑

      New Jersey % Deck Area in Good Condition on NHS Bridges


  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 21.7 21.4 22.1 20.9 --
    Target -- -- 19.4 -- 21.3

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Good Condition

    For the initial target setting process, we set initial targets based on the analysis we have performed on the State Maintained inventory, assuming that NHS bridges owned by others will remain stable, and then adjusted the targets prior to the letter to the FHWA being sent once we had sufficient data developed to look across (almost) all NHS bridge owners and check overall trends.

    The percentage good trends for Statewide NHS bridges is level while Statewide NBIS bridges trend downward. Since CY2012, we have been losing 250,000 sq. ft. per year on average from the GOOD category in the State Maintained NBIS inventory. This loss is sufficiently consistent that we do not expect it to change over the next few years.

    As the Department had never previously measured the Percent GOOD, we had not made provision for improving this statistic. Within the 4 year time frame for these targets, there is not likely to be enough time to turn this trend around. However, moving forward, as we implement AASHTOWare’s BrM as our main data analysis tool, we will be able to make projections of changes to the population of bridges rated GOOD, based on different possible longer term program makeups.

    The 2020 performance measure of 22.1 exceeded the target of 19.4 by 2.7 percentage points. In fact, the 2020 performance was better than that of 2018. The reasons for this over performance compared to the 2-year target were presented in the Response to Item B1. Briefly stated, more projects that moved bridges from Poor and Fair to Good were completed than were expected when the targets were set. Also, when NJDOT studied trends for the target setting, it observed a trend of decreasing deck area rated Good on state-maintained NHS bridges and projected this trend to continue, while projecting the remaining NHS deck area to remain stable. What actually occurred was that state-maintained deck area rated Good did not decline as steeply as the historical trend, while other owners’ deck area Good increased considerably.

    The fact that the 2020 performance exceeds the 4-year target by 3.5 percentage points required a reconsideration of the target. NJDOT looked closely at trends in deck area by each owner, gathered information from all agency owners on expected project completions, and studied recent patterns of deterioration on bridges on the NHS. Despite its increased emphasis on preservation for state-owned bridges (NHS and other) as expressed in the 2019 TAMP and the 2020-2029 STIP, NJDOT projects that the deck area rated Good on state-owned bridges will continue to decline over the near term (next two years). NJDOT’s influence on the percent Good performance measure is constrained by the fact that state-maintained bridges account for just under 60% of deck area rated Good in 2020. For non-NJDOT bridges, NJDOT projects essentially no change in the deck area rated Good, with one major exception of an addition of over 161 thousand square feet resulting from the completion by the Delaware River Joint Toll Bridge Commission of the Scudder Falls Bridge replacement. The net effect of (1) decrease on state-owned bridges and (2) increase from the Scudder Falls Bridge replacement is a projected 0.8 percentage point reduction in deck area rated Good from 22.1 in 2020 to 21.3 in 2022.

    Between the 2018 and 2020 reports, NJDOT completed 34 projects (including maintenance activities) that added 314,222 square feet to the NHS deck area rate Good. Other owners completed 44 projects that added over 1.5 million square feet of deck area rated Good. The 1.85 million square foot increase in deck area rated Good from these 78 bridges more than offset the loss of about 1 million square feet on the 88 bridges that moved from Good to Fair or Poor in this same period.

    NJDOT has a number of capital projects in the pipeline that will move bridges from Poor to Good and Fair to Good. However, NJDOT does not expect that these capital project, and any maintenance activities that are completed in the remaining reporting period, will be sufficient to offset the projected deterioration of remaining NJDOT NHS bridges in Good condition. As for other owners’ bridges, the major expected accomplishment is the completion of the southbound structure of the Scudder Falls Bridge over the Delaware River, which will add over 161 thousand square feet of deck area rated Good.

  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 NBI Data Submittal

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition

    • Trend through 2021

      Desired trend: ↓

      New Jersey % Deck Area in Poor Condition on NHS Bridges


  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021
    Condition/Performance 6.5 7.0 6.8 6.4 --
    Target -- -- 6.5 -- 6.8

  • National Highway System (NHS) Bridges in Poor Condition

    For the initial target setting we have set targets based on the analysis we have performed on State Maintained bridges, including determining the likely delivery dates of projects in the pipeline as well as near-term uncommitted bridge funding, as well as the trends seen in the condition of the bridges for the other bridge owners.

    The State Maintained bridge population is responsible for over 90% of the total POOR statewide bridges. Therefore, if we want to reduce the POOR square footage statewide, we must reduce the State Maintained POOR inventory. Although the upcoming projects do address some of that inventory, it is not sufficient to make a significant difference, especially as the average NHS bridge is almost 54 years old. This aging population results in additional inventory becoming poor every year. Based on available information, we have to assume that the State Maintained POOR percentage will remain relatively level over the next several years.

    We made the assumption that the performance of all other bridge owners was going to remain essentially level. The NJTA is responsible for 2/3 of the remaining POOR condition bridges. They have recently completed a major upgrade to their system, and have increased funding for bridge maintenance. Therefore, it is reasonable to predict that their inventory will be stable over the four year time frame. County bridge owners will be benefiting from the recent increasing in bridge funding for local aid projects from $25 million to $44+ million per year. The formula for the distribution of this funding puts an emphasis on POOR bridges. Therefore, the most significant variable at present is the State Maintained inventory. We therefore have set level targets for POOR bridges for the next 4 years.

    The 2020 performance of 6.8 percent Poor falls short of the mid-point target of 6.5 by 0.3 percentage points. The reasons for this difference were explained in depth in the overview at item B1. Stated briefly, the westbound Passaic River Bridge on New Jersey Turnpike unexpectedly deteriorated to Poor condition. This 786,818 square foot deck area bridge actually had deteriorated by the time of its inspection in December 2017, but a data transfer issue kept it out of the 2018 NBI report. Consequently, NJDOT started from too low a baseline in setting its 2020 and 2022 targets. The completion of more projects than had been projected helped greatly to offset this unexpected change in classification of this Turnpike Bridge.

    Because the state of the bridges on the NHS network looks different than it did when NJDOT was setting targets in 2018, NJDOT is re-setting its 4-year target to align with the new performance level. Because the NJTA generally maintains its bridges in Fair, if not Good condition, the deterioration of the Passaic River Bridge to Poor was unexpected and is viewed as an outlier. NJTA has repairs underway but does not anticipate that the repairs will restore the bridge’s condition rating to Fair within next two years. NJDOT retains the outlook that it had when setting the initial targets, namely that completed capital projects will just keep pace with deterioration, and the percentage of deck area on bridges rated Poor will remain at the current 6.8 percent.

    The adjustment in the target is consistent with the path towards the State of Good Repair Objective expressed in the 2019 New Jersey TAMP that at least 95% of deck area be good or fair (no more than 5% poor.) by 2029. The TAMP anticipated a slight decrease in performance in the early years of the ten-year planning period, followed by substantial improvements starting in 2024 as the planned increased NJDOT investment in rehabilitation and reconstruction begins to take effect.

    Between the 2018 and 2020 reports, NJDOT completed 36 projects (including maintenance activities and one demolition) that removed just over 470,320 square feet from the NHS deck area rated Poor. Other owners completed 6 projects that removed just over 178,324 square feet of deck area rated Poor. The total 648,644 square foot decrease in deck area rated poor from these 42 bridges was not enough to offset the deterioration of other bridges, resulting in a net increase of deck area poor.

    NJDOT has a number of capital projects in the pipeline that will move bridges from Poor to Good or Fair. NJDOT does not expect that the capital projects, and any maintenance activities that are completed in the remaining reporting period, will be sufficient to offset projected deterioration of remaining NJDOT NHS bridges in Poor condition. The net effect will be a slight increase in deck area rated poor on NJDOT bridges. For Non-NJDOT owners’ bridges, three NJTA projects are expected to convert about 113,961 SF square foot of deck area from Poor to Fair.

  • Data Sources:
    New Jersey 2018, 2020 Biennial Performance Report
    New Jersey 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 NBI Data Submittal


Significant Progress Determination

PLEASE NOTE: Each State’s performance target assessment is based on its own State-specific target methodology and program philosophy. Therefore, conclusions should not be drawn based only on the information in the 2020 Mid Performance Period Significant Progress Determination Results table. For example, the State may have set aggressive targets, and not met those targets, while another State may have set more easily attainable targets, and met those targets. FHWA understands that each State’s program is unique and therefore does not prescribe a methodology for States to set targets. States have the flexibility to use the methodology they deem most appropriate when setting their performance targets.

A State has met or made significant progress toward target achievement if “actual” condition/performance is equal to or better than the established two-year target or “actual” condition/performance is better than baseline performance 23 CFR 490.109 (e).

New Jersey 2020 Mid Performance Period Significant Progress Determination Results
Measure Area Measures Baseline Target Actual Better than Baseline? Achieved Target? Made Significant Progress? Consequences [23 CFR 490.109(f)]
The condition of pavements on the National Highway System (NHS) (excluding the Interstate) Percentage of pavements of the non-Interstate NHS in Good condition Based only on IRI 41.9 --- 44.4 Yes --- Yes Additional reporting
Based on Full Distress + IRI --- 25.0 33.0 --- Yes
Percentage of pavements of the non-Interstate NHS in Poor condition Based only on IRI 26.5 --- 26.9 No --- No
Based on Full Distress + IRI --- 2.5 10.7 --- No
The condition of bridges on the National Highway System Percentage of NHS bridges classified as in Good condition 21.7 19.4 22.1 Yes Yes Yes Additional reporting
Percentage of NHS bridges classified as in Poor condition 6.5 6.5 6.8 No No No
Updated: 05/17/2022
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