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Publication Number: FHWA-RD-96-143
Date: April 1997

Development of Human Factors Guidelines for Advanced Traveler Information Systems and Commercial Vehicle Operations: Definition and Prioritization of Research Studies

 

APPENDIX D: EXPERIMENT 2 MATERIALS

 

SUBJECT'S FAMILIARITY WITH DRIVING IN SEATTLE: PRE–SELECT PHONE QUESTIONNAIRE

DRIVER DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS QUESTIONNAIRE (PHONE)

DRIVER DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

EXPERIMENT 2: TRUST & SELF–CONFIDENCE

EXPERIMENT 2: INTER–LINK QUESTIONS

EXPERIMENT 2: MODIFYING YOUR TRIP TO AVOID TRAFFIC

EXPERIMENT 2: TRUST IN THE ROUTE GUIDANCE SYSTEM

EXPERIMENT 2: DEMONSTRATION FIDELITY

 

SUBJECT'S FAMILIARITY WITH DRIVING IN SEATTLE: PRE–SELECT PHONE QUESTIONNAIRE

Purpose: Before a subject can be selected to participate in Experiment 2, he or she must have a sufficient degree of familiarity with driving in Seattle.

Questions:

1) Do you have an active Driver's License? Yes No

2) How familiar are you with driving in Seattle?

very unfamiliar unfamiliar familiar very familiar

3) How familiar are you with driving in Bellevue?

very unfamiliar unfamiliar familiar very familiar

4) How many times per week do you drive in Seattle?

< 1/wk 1–2 times/wk 3–4 times/wk 5 + times/wk

Scoring:

1) All subjects MUST have an active Driver's License.

2) Subjects must answer "familiar" or "very familiar" with driving in Seattle.

3) Subjects must drive at least 1–2 times/wk.

 

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DRIVER DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS QUESTIONNAIRE (PHONE)

1. Age: _____

2. Number of years as a licensed driver: _____

3. Number of years driving in Seattle: _____

4. Number of years lived in Seattle _____

5. Town of residence: ________________________

6. Gender: Male Female

7. Marital status: ______ (single, married, other)

8. Number of family members in household: _____

9. Do you own your own automobile? Yes No

Answer the following for the vehicle you most frequently drive.

Make ________

Model ________

Year ________

10. Check the average number of miles you drive annually.

less than 5,000

5,000 – 9,999

10,000 – 19,999

20,000 – 39,999

40,000 – 69,999

70,000 – 99,999

more than 100,000

11. For each of the following trip types, please estimate the number of trips per week you make in Seattle.

_____ commute to work (one way only)

_____ shopping trips

_____ errands

_____ social visits

_____ recreation

12. How many vacation trips per year do you take? _____

13. Which of the following does the vehicle you most frequently use have?

air bags

anti–lock brakes (ABS)

cassette player

cellular phone/radio phone

cruise control

electronic dashboard displays

garage door opener

power brakes

power steering

power windows and door locks

radar detector

 

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DRIVER DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

In this section, the questions we ask will give us an idea of your background and use of certain kinds of devices. For some questions you will need to circle your response. For other questions, you can answer by placing an "X" in the box that applies to you. Please answer each question as accurately as possible. Remember that all responses will be confidential.

1. Education level:

Below 12th grade (less than high school completion)

High School diploma (or equivalent)

Some College

Associates Degree

Bachelors Degree

Advanced Degree

2. Ethnic group:

American Indian/Alaskan Native

Asian or Pacific Islander

African American

Caucasian

Hispanic

Other (please describe)

3. Annual household income:

under $20,000

$20,000 – 39,999

$40,000 – 59,999

$60,000 – 79,999

$80,000 – 99,999

greater than $100,000

4. For each of the following devices, please indicate if you own the device by marking an "X" in the "OWN" column. Then indicate if you use the device by marking an "X" in the "USE" column. For the devices you use, please indicate how frequently you use each device by entering a number in the "FREQUENCY OF USE" column (e.g., once a month, three times a week).

DEVICE OWN USE FREQUENCY OF USE
Automatic teller machine (ATM) card N/A    
Videocassette recorder (VCR)      
Hand-held calculator      
Cordless phone      
Microwave oven      
Personal computer      
DOS      
Windows      
Macintosh      
Computer bulletin boards N/A    
Telephone answering machine/voice messaging      

It is important to us to understand how comfortable you feel with computers. For items 17–22, please mark with an "X" to indicate how much each statement below applies to you. Marking toward the 100 would indicate that a statement strongly applies. Marking toward the 0 would indicate that it does not apply.

5. I am sure I could do work with computers.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

6. I would like working with computers.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

7. I would feel comfortable working with computers.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

8. Working with a computer would make me very nervous.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

9. I do as little work with computers as possible.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

10. I think using a computer would be very hard for me.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

 

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EXPERIMENT 2: TRUST & SELF–CONFIDENCE

We are interested in your judgments of how trustworthy you believe the technology to be. In addition, we are interested in how much self–confidence you have in your ability to do things yourself.

First, think about your trust in people. We all trust some people more than others. If you think about people you know, you can probably think of some you trust very much and others you trust much less. We do not trust all people equally, and we can express how much we trust a particular person.

We also think about trusting things, such as products. For example, I trust my car to start in the morning because it has never failed to do so. I trust my spouse's car much less because of a history of trouble.

Similar to trust, we can also consider the self–confidence in our own abilities. For example, you might have a great deal of self–confidence in your ability to walk to work because you have been doing it every day for several years.

If you think about it for a moment, we could rate our degree of trust and self–confidence in many of the things we use on a scale like those shown below. So let's rate a few functions that may be available in your vehicle in the future. Marking toward the 100 would indicate that a statement strongly applies. Marking toward the 0 would indicate it does not apply.

1. I would trust a navigation system to guide me through a familiar city (e.g., home town).

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

2. I have confidence in my ability to navigate myself through a familiar city (e.g, home town).

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

3. I would trust a new automatic route guidance system to avoid highway congestion.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

4. I have confidence in my ability to avoid highway congestion based upon my own observation of traffic.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

 

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EXPERIMENT 2: INTER–LINK QUESTIONS

TRIAL _________ LINK __________

INTER–LINK QUESTIONS

We are interested to know what your feelings are about using the Route Guidance System . To help us, please mark with an "X" to indicate how much the statements below apply to you. Marking toward the 100 indicates that a statement strongly applies. Marking toward the 0 indicates that it does not apply.

1. I have trust in the Route Guidance System to provide accurate traffic information about traffic conditions.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

2. I have self–confidence in my ability to accurately anticipate traffic conditions.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

3. I felt that the actual traffic situation met my expectations of what I anticipated the traffic to be like.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

 

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EXPERIMENT 2: MODIFYING YOUR TRIP TO AVOID TRAFFIC

This section is used to help us understand how accurate navigation advice needs to be for drivers to use it. Pick the response that's best for you.

1. Would you pay attention to navigation advice which might occasionally make your trip longer (in minutes) intentionally, but would reduce overall traffic congestion?

Yes No

2. If so, how many extra minutes of travel, for a trip that normally takes 35 minutes, would you be willing to accept?

0–1 min. 5–10 min.

1–5 min. more than 10 min.

3. How often would you tolerate such delays and still use the advice?

0–1 times in 20 trips 5–10 times in 20 trips

1–5 times in 20 trips more than 10 times in 20 trips

4. For a journey that normally takes 35 minutes, how many minutes would you need to save to make it worthwhile to use an unfamiliar route?

0–1 min. 5–10 min.

1–5 min. more than 10 min.

5. Imagine you can get a time estimate for a trip that accounts for traffic conditions. This trip normally takes 35 minutes. If the system was occasionally wrong, how many minutes would you accept arriving early and still use the system?

0–1 min. 5–10 min.

1–5 min. more than 10 min.

6. For the same system, how many minutes would you accept arriving late and still use the system?

0–1 min. 5–10 min.

1–5 min. more than 10 min.

7. Imagine you have a system that predicts traffic congestion but does not always warn you of traffic delays. How frequently could the system fail to predict delays and still be useful to you?

0–1 times in 20 trips 5–10 times in 20 trips

1–5 times in 20 trips more than 10 times in 20 trips

8. Imagine you have a system that predicts traffic congestion but you find that it occasionally predicts congestion when traffic is moving smoothly. How frequently could the system falsely report congestion and still be useful to you?

0–1 times in 20 trips 5–10 times in 20 trips

1–5 times in 20 trips more than 10 times in 20 trips

 

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EXPERIMENT 2: TRUST IN THE ROUTE GUIDANCE SYSTEM

We are interested in your judgments of how trustworthy you believe the technology to be.

To help us, please mark with an "X" to indicate how much the statements below apply to you. Marking toward the 100 indicates that a statement strongly applies. Marking toward the 0 indicates that it does not apply.

1. I trust the system because it produces reliable information.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

2. I trust the system because of my knowledge of how it operates.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

3. I trust that the system will act in my interest.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

4. I trust how the system processes and displays traffic information.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

5. I trust the system based on how often it is correct.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

6. I trust the system because it was designed to minimize my trip time.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

7. I trust the system based on my understanding of how it generates information.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

8. I trust the system because its purpose is to provide accurate information.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

9. I trust the system to accurately predict traffic conditions.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

 

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EXPERIMENT 2: DEMONSTRATION FIDELITY

It is important to understand how much the Advanced Traveler Information System demonstration put you in the place of a user. To help us, please mark with an "X" to indicate how much the statements below apply to you. Marking toward the 100 indicates that a statement strongly applies. Marking toward the 0 indicates that it does not apply.

1. I felt the demonstration captured my attention.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

2. In my opinion, other drivers will feel the demonstration captures what using the system will be like.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

3. In my opinion, other drivers will feel their attention captured by the demonstration.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

4. The demonstration gave me the feel of what using the system would be like.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

5. I would like to see other new system demonstrations.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

6. My attention wandered during the demonstration.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

7. In my opinion, other drivers' attention will wander during the demonstration.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

8. The demonstration gave me a realistic impression of how the system might work.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

9. The demonstration will give other drivers a realistic impression of how the system might work.

Graph showing Does not Apply to Strongly Applies

 

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FHWA-RD-96-143

 

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