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Guidelines for using existing pavements in rapid construction to extend pavement life and save money.

Pavement Renewal Solutions (R23)

Challenge

Highway agencies need guidance to help better understand when and where it can be beneficial to use existing pavements to speed rehabilitation project delivery. Use of existing pavement can reduce cost; however, it is not always a viable solution. By being able to identify projects where this technique can be successful, highway agencies can apply the process with more confidence, and reap the benefits of lower cost, and more rapidly rehabilitated facilities.

Solution

An interactive web-based pavement design scoping tool provides much-needed guidance for deciding where and under what conditions to use existing pavement as part of roadway renewal projects. It includes approaches for employing existing pavements in-place to ensure longer service life for roads using asphalt, concrete, and innovative materials. The product also identifies new alternatives to renewal approaches; and examines the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, the circumstances under which each should be considered, different construction techniques, and methods for integrating recycled materials with adjacent materials and road structures.

This guide will help transportation agencies make better decisions with regard to pavement renewal projects by using existing pavement as part of the design. Transportation agencies, drivers, highway workers, contractors, and taxpayers will benefit from time savings based on rapid reuse of existing materials, reduced costs for new pavement, and an accelerated construction process. Washington DOT has utilized the recommendations offered in this guide, and has realized a 30 percent cost savings and a 50 percent reduction in user delay costs over the life of the new pavement. This approach delivers long-lasting value by promoting durable and dependable roads, while reducing the environmental footprint because less new pavement is required.

Benefits

  • Decreased use of new pavements.
  • Shorter construction time, resulting in reduced exposure of travelers and construction workers to work zone hazards.
  • A better return on investment based on longer pavement service life.
  • Reduced environmental footprint, based on decreased use of new materials.

In the Field

State Project Description Activity Contact
Arizona Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. Lead Adopter Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
California Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. Lead Adopter Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
Kentucky Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. Lead Adopter Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
Minnesota Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. Lead Adopter Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
Utah Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. User Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
New Jersey Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. User Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
Louisiana Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. User Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
North Dakota Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. User Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov
New York Implementation Assistance Program - DOT: Project description coming soon. User Incentive Steve Mueller (FHWA) steve.mueller@dot.gov

Field activities also performed in Washington during the research phase.

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